Tales from Olive French

In the 1960s, a woman named Olive French began researching and writing a history of Oshawa’s early education, educators, and schools.  This manuscript was never published but was later donated to the archives.  In the early 2010s, Visitor Experience Coordinator Jill Passmore set out to transcribe the manuscript, which was made available to researchers through the blog olivefrench.wordpress.com.  During her transcription process, Jill shared some of her favourite ‘tidbits’ on the Museum’s Facebook page, which bear repeating here on our blog.  Be sure to check out the Olive French site and discover a little more about education and early life in Oshawa.


An anecdote about Beaton’s store: For some reason best known to them, Beaton’s had a display of chamber pots in the window of their china shop. A lady went by with two small children, around the age of four or five years old. When they saw what was in the window, they let it be known in good clear voices – “Oh, look at the jims,” “see all the jim’s”! Their mother decided that she would take the children by, on the other side of the street until Beaton’s changed their window decorations!
Jim’s is possibly a derivative of “Jimmy” and “Jimmy Riddle”, which is British slang for “urinating”


The birch rod, so popular in the early days was gradually ruled out of the schools. Some of the older scholars, on a few occasions had received broken fingers through its injudicious use. The strap became a popular way to emphasize obedience and to stimulate the lazy ones. As a rule the parents did not come to the school and complain about Johnny’s or Mary’s punishment. If a child deserved it he got no sympathy from “ma or pa.” Most children were told, “if you get a lickin’ in school you’re git another when you git home.”


One could scarcely imagine the health authorities of today tolerating a smelly place like Dick Hobb’s fish store (Simcoe Street South).


For the most part the common schoolteachers had only a common school education and no professional training. They were usually discharged soldiers or new comers who were ill equipped to take a more lucrative position. The teacher’s qualifications were his ability to keep order while his pupils memorized their lessons that he assigned to them from their textbooks and recited them to him.


Scholars [at DeMill Ladies’ College] were requested to bring with them, to the college, their own towels, table napkins and ring, one pillow and pillow cases, one pair of sheets and bed covers suitable for the season. They also had to bring a knife, a fork and a spoon, all these articles was to be marked with the owner’s name. They must provide themselves with clothing suitable for the season and were requested to wear inexpensive, neat and plain clothing. More thought was to be given to schoolwork than to dress.


Another escapade took place in Centre Street Public School in 1888 or 1889; this one was not serious but it emptied one of the rooms for a half of a day. One of the pupils, Maisie, aged ten years, whose father kept bees, thought she would see what could be done about a half holiday on a one nice day in the spring. She had no fear of bees whatever and could go out among the bee hives at her home and pick out the drones and the other bees did not attack her. It is believed that those insects are aware of it, when anyone is afraid of them. Drones are male bees and do not sting. At lunch time that day, she put a few drones in her pocket before she left to go back to school. After the bell rang and things got settled down in her room, she let the bees go. There was a near panic of course; no one else knew that the bees were drones. There was no need to dismiss the room; the room dismissed itself, teacher and all. How she ever dared to do a thing like that when Mr. Smith was principal was a question. She must have been brave. No doubt she was punished at school; the teachers wouldn’t have seen any joke about it like her father did. She happened to be my cousin, he was C.S. French.

Centre Street School in the 1920s; A004.14.3

In the earliest years when the High School was in the new building, report cards were not given to the pupils. Marks obtained on the exams were posted on the bulletin boards and the papers were handed back to the pupils. A record was kept in the office of each student’s marks, during the year. Before the final exams in the higher grades, the scholars were called individually to the office for an interview with the principal. He gave his opinion on the advisability of trying or not. A fee was charged for the departmental exams.


An amusing report was printed in the Vindicator April 7th 1876. It was the day of the trustee meeting and not one of them was present. “A number of the members had joined an elocution class and it had met on the same evening. Some very brilliant oration at the meetings was to be expected now. A new pump was needed at the school and it would be an excellent chance for brilliant elocutionary effect for the property committee.”

Also the following; at one time when there was no quorum and no meeting of the school board all of the trustees were attending an oyster supper. Someone suggested that it might be a good idea, on the night of the trustee meetings to give oyster suppers and invite the members of the board to attend. Perhaps they might be induced to transact the school business afterwards.

What I Did This Summer

By Jill Passmore, Visitor Experience Co-ordinator

This summer, I learned that I would be saying goodbye to my childhood home. I’m sure most of you have experienced this at some point. While I am excited for my parents to be starting a new chapter in their lives, this means the end of one for my sister, brother, and me. Thankfully, I’ve had more time to process the announcement because I was the one who showed them their new house. In an unexpected turn of events, my parents are moving into the home of family friends on my husband’s side of the family, which is five minutes away from my in-laws! The world works in mysterious ways, doesn’t it?

My family moved to Oshawa in 1986 from Port Credit, Ontario – now a suburb of Mississauga. We upgraded from a townhouse to a semi-detached. I remember my first thought upon seeing the house was, “Wow! It has two doors and two garages!” Our ‘new to us’ home was chosen in part because of its proximity to so many amenities, such as St. Michael’s Catholic School (pre-1987/1988 renovation), the Civic Auditorium, the Ministry of Transportation, and a Scotiabank. For a number of years, we didn’t have backyard neighbours as our home looked onto greenspace, a Ryder Truck rental, and Sheridan Nurseries.

Since then, the area has seen many changes. We watched the building of the plaza behind the Scotiabank and frequented the St. Hubert’s, the anchor store for a while. We attended City of Oshawa meetings when developers proposed the building of a bingo parlour directly behind us. This turned into the plaza that was originally home to Don Cherry’s Sports Bar and the Oshawa Funeral Home. My Dad and sister even met Mr. Cherry one day when he was out inspecting the new restaurant. This was much more exciting 25 years ago than it would be today! Nevertheless, to the other extent, some things don’t change. I’ve been going to the same dentist and same veterinary clinic for almost 35 years – both chosen, of course, because they were close by and within walking distance.

So how do you say goodbye to decade’s worth of trick or treating, birthday parties, proms, breakups, wedding photos, and baby visits? I’m still working through that. When we moved in, there was a maple tree in the centre of the yard and a cedar hedge surrounding it, which was very inconvenient for three kids playing back there. I remember looking down into the basement (which had drawings on the wall from the previous owner’s kids – something my parents never allowed us to do!) to see a sea of boxes everywhere. As the boxes for the move began to pile up in the last few weeks, this memory grew stronger.

Thinking in terms of how technology has changed over the years, we moved in with a small, yellow, 12 or 13-inch television and VCR. An answering machine eventually came, as did cassette tape players that we bought at the nearby K-Mart or Woolco. Through the years, TVs were upgraded and we moved through CD players and DVD players; the landline is now outdated and the grandkids keep asking for the Wi-Fi password.

My brother and I had these great custom shelves in our bedrooms, left by the previous owners. They were perfect for storing our toys, stuffed animals, and games. When my parents let us paint our rooms to suit our taste, the walls were one colour and trim and accents were another colour. This must have been a trend in the ’80s as a lot of the house was like this! My brother and I spent a lot of time playing together, combining our toys to make epic playsets, using Construx to make houses for my Barbies, who dated the WWF (now WWE) wrestlers or He-Man figures.

We kids have long since been given all of our toys and stuffed animals, memorabilia, and mementos to keep at our own homes. All that is left is 35 years of my parent’s lives, rediscovering photos and ephemera from their own early days together and figuring out what to do with the collection of camping gear and tools – how do you pack a garage?

At the time of writing this, there are less than two weeks to process not visiting my childhood home on an (at least) weekly basis. I get nostalgic driving past my grandparents’ house, which can be seen from Rossland Road, and I wonder if my kids, nieces, and nephews will feel the same way driving past my own parents’ home. Years ago, my grandparents’ home was up for sale, and we were fortunate enough to go to the open house. Will I want to revisit my own childhood home? I imagine only time will tell.

Addendum: The big move has happened, and everything went well. This is a big adjustment period for everyone. My husband drove past the old house last night on his way home from the dentist we’ve had all these years. His report back to me: “It looks the same.”

The Month That Was – September 1864

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Vindicator

September 7, 1864
Page 2

Library, or Reading Room
As will be seen from a sketch of the proceedings at the several meetings held, a Mechanics’ Institute and Library Association has been organized for a second time in Oshawa.  It is to be hoped that the institution will be more successful this time than it was the first, and there is no reason why it should not.  The first one was a miserable affair and a large amount of property was sunk in it, in one way and another, but not by anybody looking after its affairs very closely or endeavouring to keep the institution up.  Nobody seemed to take any ordinary degree of interest in it, even as a library association, and it never was anything more.  Few meetings were held in connection with it, and in the course of time its library was neglected, suffered to go to ruin by want of usage as well as bad usage, and eventually sold for ‘a raere song.’ With this experience before then, no doubt the Directors of the newly organized association will pursue a very different course from that which resulted so disastrously to its predecessor.  Our village is tolerably well supplied with library works thro’ our Common School library that was, and which now is our ‘United Grammar and Common School’ library.  If there is any deficiency of reading matter in that library, it can be supplied by the United Board of Grammar and Common School Trustees in such a way as to give us one complete village library, all under one management. And now that the Grammar School has an interest in the School Library, there ought to be an additional sum of money voted towards procuring new and interesting works for the replenishment of its shelves every year. By doing this, there will be no need of the funds of the Mechanics’ Institute being used up, as those of the former one were, in purchasing a library, leaving an insufficient sum for other purposes of more importance. Let the whole of the funds be devoted to procuring a superior course of lectures, and other entertainments for the winter evenings, and providing a Reading Room containing a number of the leaving English, American, and Canadian papers, and the institution cannot fail to prosper.  But let its funds be used up in purchasing needless and expensive books, and it can hardly avoid, except by taxing somebody’s time and labor quite too severely, meeting with the fate of its predecessor.

Steam up – On Monday last steam was introduced for the first time into the new engine at E. Miall and Co’s cabinet factory, and the boiler and engine, etc. tested. The shafting is not yet all in position and consequently the machinery was not moved.  The engine is a fine piece of mechanism, for a first attempt, and is a good illustration of the capacity of Joseph Hall’s Mill and Job department.

September 7, 1864, page 1

Raft Ashore – On Monday morning last a large raft of square timber towed by the Steamer Hercules, went ashore and broke up near Port Oshawa.  The wind blowing from the lake at the time, the greater part of the timber was washed ashore.

September 7, 1864, page 3; for more on Mrs. PA Henry, read HERE

September 21, 1864
Page 2

The School House
The work of making the addition of 40 feet to the west end of the Union School House is rapidly approaching completion.  The mason work was completed some two weeks ago, and the roof has been put on and the floors laid.  Two small gables have been erected over each doorway in addition to the original plan as given out to contract, which will add considerably to the appearance of the structure, which otherwise would have had an exceedingly unpleasant look in an architectural point of view.  The new rooms will be very airy ones, the floor of the under story being two feet lower than that of the old portion, and the ceiling of the upper room being attached to the roof, giving it somewhat the appearance, overhead, of the Presbyterian Church.

Conviction Quashed – We find the following in the Chronicle’s report of the last Quarter Sessions: – “Conviction of John Stokes for selling liquor on Sunday. – In this case Mr. J. Stokes, hotel keeper, of Oshawa, appealed against the conviction of G.H. Grierson, the convicting magistrate, by which a fine of $20 was imposed for selling liquor on Sunday. There was no respondent’s name in the papers. Conviction quashed. Mr. Lyman English appeared for the appellant.”

Where was our Reeve when the case was called?

A New Grocery Store – A new grocery, provision and crockery store is to be opened out in a few days, in the store in Gibbs’ block, formerly occupied by L. Vancamp, and lately by Gibbs & Bro. The Proprietors are Messrs. Bremner & Urquhart.  Their advertisement will appear next week.

September 21, 1864, page 3

September 28, 1864
Page 2

Excelsior Machines – Two splendid pieces of mechanism left Joseph Hall’s establishment on Monday last for Hamilton. One was the Reaper and Mower to be awarded at the Provincial Plowing Match to the best plowman, as mentioned in our last, and the other a Thresher and Horse Power for competition at the Provincial Exhibition. – They are, doubtless, the two best machines of the kind ever manufactured in any part of the world.

Birth – At Whitby, on the 19th inst., the wife of William Laing Esq., Mayor of Whitby, of twin sons.

Died – At Whitby, on the morning of the 19th inst., deeply and deservedly regretted, Louisa Amelia, the beloved wife of William Laing Esq., Mayor of the Town of Whitby, aged 40 years and six months.

September 28, 1864, page 3

Oshawa and Electric Rail

By Adam A., Summer Student

Hello once again! While working of the Discover Historic Oshawa website I learned many new details about the city. One particularly surprising detail being that the City of Oshawa has a surprisingly long history with electric rail.

The Oshawa Railway, incorporated in 1887, used electricity to power its street cars and the “shunters” which pulled freight around between factories and the major rail systems. For most of its history, the OR was entirely electric. The only exceptions being early on when some, as of yet unelectrified, sections were handled by small steam engines and after June of 1964 when all electrified operations of the OR ceased.

A998.13.10

Oshawa’s next flirtation with electric rail came in 1923, when the Toronto Eastern Railway came to town and promptly died. The Toronto Eastern Railway was a subsidiary of by the industrialist William Mackenzie’s Canadian Northern Railway. It was to be a “high speed” electric railway intended by Mackenzie to better connect Ontario’s urban centres. It was incorporated in 1910, but the outbreak of the First World War delayed construction, a fact not helped by the parent company defaulting on its debts and being acquired by the federal government in 1917. The line would only be built out to Oshawa in 1923 and was abandoned the following year due to lack of funding.

Oshawa Railway Line Map, 1920

Oshawa had another near brush with an electric line in the 1980s. The Government of Ontario set its hopes on expanding GO service out to Oshawa by means of an express light rail between downtown Oshawa and the Pickering GO Station. These were to be electric vehicles travelling at an average of 70km/h. In the mid-1980s, changes in federally legislated rail right of way and difficulties developing the ALRT vehicle, prompted the Government of Ontario to abandon the project in favour of extending conventional GO service out to Oshawa.

Will electric rail come to Oshawa again? Will it even be proposed again? Well, there’s no way to know for sure, but some sort of zero carbon emission mass transit system is probably going to be proposed at some point, perhaps as a new transportation project, or perhaps as a modification of the existing passenger rail infrastructure.

Family Tales and (In)Famous Taverns

By Mia V., Summer Student

Continuously figuring out how my own family’s stories fit into the grander narrative of History with a capital H is my favourite part of historical research. I’ve realized the importance of this on a larger scale while researching for the Oshawa Museum’s oral history project on displaced persons and post-WWII immigration more generally. Most recently, I’ve realized how the two strands – family history and post-war history – converged with local history as I researched the hotel located at 394 Simcoe St. S.

My grandpa, who goes by Joe, first bought this hotel along with his uncle (my great-great-uncle) George Radusin. A Serb from Yugoslavia, George’s story of immigration mirrors that of many displaced persons. After fighting in the Second World War, he survived and made it to Italy. With the help of the Allied armies, he moved through several different resettlement camps in Italy and in Germany and eventually made it to Canada. In Sudbury, he worked in the mines and, like most other displaced persons, soon sought a safer and more fulfilling career – which happened to be in hotels and investments. In Cornwall, over two decades after the war, he was able to help my grandpa – his nephew – join him. My grandma, mom, and uncle were eventually able to join my grandpa after four years apart from each other. Despite the two separate waves of immigration – post-1945 and then the 1970s – this kind of ‘chain migration’ is another very common theme in immigration stories. (Please see the entry “Family’s Journey” on our online exhibit if you would like to learn more.)

With all that said, where does the local history of Oshawa – and this one hotel – fit into the story? According to an article from the Oshawa Times, the hotel on Simcoe Street South was built in 1886.[1] Unfortunately, despite digging around in city directories, I was not able to confirm this year. As for the original building, it is quite clear that it has gone through extensive expansion and renovation. In any case, it is interesting to note that, at least in the years 1921-1936, it was owned (and resided in for at least some of the time) by J.D. Storie. You may recognize his name because he is known as the founder of Fittings Limited. After Storie passed away in 1936, the lot remained vacant and afterwards was sold to two separate owners – a William Patterson and a A.W. Jewell, as listed in 1939.

In 1945 or 1946, it became the Cadillac Hotel, at least in part (as the property also had the second identifier of S.S. Vassar). The location was in fact ideal for a hotel at this time. The railway station was only a short walk away, and it was therefore possible to wait for the train at the hotel, as another relative of Joe’s had done (he was also coincidentally someone who settled in Oshawa as a displaced person after the war).

1960s postcard. The back advertises the hotel as “Oshawa’s newest,” boasting “modern rooms” and an “attractive dining room.”

Hotels were quite a lucrative business in Oshawa’s “early days,” welcoming weary travellers over land (by stage-coach or horseback) which meant they required frequent rests.[2] A newspaper article dating back to around 1963, says that the Cadillac Hotel has been seen as “one of Oshawa’s finest hotels.” It had the look of an “old English manor” but was still “equipped to provide all of today’s modern comforts to its patrons.” Various events and functions, including bowling banquets and staff parties were held there. By the 1970s, however, the nearby station was closed for passenger service[3] – perhaps playing a role in the changing reputation of the hotel. The hotel also changed hands several times – and names, once, to the Karlin Hotel.

My grandpa Joe on the left and a bartender Tony on the right. The article’s caption says that the new owners are “hoping the name, atmosphere and policy attract a different climate.”

And, here is where my family story begins to intersect once again! In 1982, my grandpa Joe and his uncle George bought the Karlin Hotel and set about transforming it into the Simcoe Tavern the following year. After some very intense renovations, the hotel was apparently unrecognizable for patrons who visited it. The changes including adhering to requirements in order to gain an additional liquor license as well as a battle with the city (primarily regarding the family atmosphere of the neighbourhood).

Business card for the Simcoe Tavern, advertising its two bars – attracting a wide clientele

However, prior to the renovations, Joe wondered whether he had made the right decision in buying the place. Had he known about the hotel’s more sordid history, he said, he would’ve stayed in Cornwall. This impression was reinforced on the first night of reopening the bar when a fight actually broke out! With the strict measure of initially banning seventy individuals (in a list that hung over the bar), business headed in the right direction.[4] The two bars became the Rock Connection – known for booking in local rock and roll bands and especially tribute bands from Toronto – and Spurs which played country music. Booking rock bands cost “almost twice as much as country bands,” however, and, once the nearby Purple Onion began “booking all rock bands, the competition was too stiff.”[5]

The Side Street Inn in the early 1990s, the hotel as Mia knew it

Joe sold the hotel in 1991, but was actually back to running it by 1993 – with a new name now, the Street Side Inn. In those years, the hotel continued to improve its reputation for good local music – especially with the Moon Room. Finally, in 2007, Joe sold the hotel in preparation for retirement.

Real estate listing from 2007

History, as I’ve come to believe, is really made up of smaller stories like these. I would encourage anyone interested (who hasn’t already!) to investigate all those stories they grew up hearing about, especially those related to local landmarks they spent so much time in.


[1] Laura Lind, “Rock Connection closes: Simcoe Tavern club becomes sporting goods store,” The Oshawa Times, Feb. 16, 1991.

[2] “Hotels were important in early days of Oshawa,” The Oshawa Times, July 30 1984.

[3] “Oshawa Station (Canadian Pacific Railway),” Toronto Railway Historical Association http://www.trha.ca/trha/history/stations-2/oshawa-station-canadian-pacific-railway/nggallery/image/oshawacpr1987/.

[4] “Karlin Hotel becomes Oshawa’s Simcoe Tavern after $35,000,” Oshawa This Week, Jun. 17 1982.

[5] Lind, “Rock Connection closes.”