The Month That Was – December 1872

All  articles are from the Ontario Reformer

December 6, 1872
A short time ago a horse was advertised in the Reformer as strayed.  It  had been missing for some weeks, and no clue to its whereabouts could be obtained till the day after the “ad” appeared, when the owner saw it and got his horse.  One day this week a man came in to advertise a steer which had strayed on to his premises.  Before the advertisement appeared in print the owner had his animal.  If you want anything made known bring your advertisement to the Reformer office.  We presume the reason why the last anumal was recovered so soon was, the “ad” was paid for in advance.

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December 6, 1872, page 1

December 6, 1872
Births

In Oshawa, on the 3rd inst., the wife of Thomas Hopper, of a son.

In Oshawa, on the 4th inst, the wife of Mr. Parks, Bruce Street, of a son.

In Harmony, on the 3rd inst., the wife of Mr. Calston Horn, of a son.

In Oshawa on the 30th ult., the wife of Mr. Wm. Right, of a son.

Married

On the 27th ult., by the Rev. Wm. Scott Mr Thomas Hoskin Jr., of Oshawa, to Miss Eliza Jane, eldest daughter of the late Mr. John Colman, of Darlington

 

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December 6, 1872, page 2

 

December 13, 1872
Terrible Conflegration (sic)
Oshawa ‘Chicagoed’
Fourteen places of business and seven dwellings destroyed
The fire supposed to be the work of an ifcendiary (sic)

The most fearful fire that ever took place in Oshawa was that of Sunday night last.  About ten minutes after seven, a fire was discovered in the clothing store of Mr. Geo. Hodder, and the alarm was immediately given.  The Fire Brigade was soon at the scenes of the conflagration, and at work; but, as usual, the water supply gave out, and the efforts of the firemen to confine the fire to the place where it originated proved unsuccessful.  Quickly the flames spread, and soon the adjoining stores were enveloped with the devouring elements.  It now became evident that the entire row of buildings, from Fitzmaurice’s drug store, around the corner, to Garth’s butcher shop, was doomed, unless a good supply of water could be obtained.  There were three engines at work, Oshawa No. 1 and 2 and the little chemical engine from the Hall Works, all doing well when they could obtain water.  When it became evident that the fire was likely to spread as it did, endangering the whole town, Mr. C.W. Smith procured a horse and went for the Whitby steam fire engine, having first made arrangements for a team to meet the engine on its way down.  Inside of an hour and ten minutes after Mr. Smith left for Whitby, the steamer was playing on the fire, procuring water from the well at Black’s corner.  And well did this little “Merryweather’ under the management of the noble Whitby Fire Brigade, do its work – nobly did the brigade work; and to-day the businessmen on the north side of King Street may thank the Whitby Fire Brigade for saving – with their engine – their property.  Just before the Whitby engine arrived, it was fully expected that the Gibbs block would go, as the heat from the burning buildings was intense.  In fact, in front of the Chisholm’s store, Blamey & Briggs’ store, and the top of Hind’s hotel, were on fire, but with the help of the ‘little chemical,’ the fire in the two  stores was put out, and Hind’s was saved by the Whitby engine.  All this time, the Oshawa Brigade, with old No. 1 and No. 2, was working as they always work – nobly.  But what is the use of a fire engine without water! The Oshawa Hook and Ladder Company worked like ‘all out doors’ as they always do. The citizens, with a few exceptions, worked as if the property belonged to the doing all they could to save goods from the doomed stores.  Men and boys ‘played horse’ and with wagons drew away the goods as fast as they could be loaded, to places of safety.

… The fire was, indeed bad; but how much worse might it have been.  A few accidents happened to the firemen and others, but none of a serious nature.  Let us be thankful that there were no lives lost.

…The persons who burst open Mr. Hoddor’s door distinctly state that the fire first started in the north-west corner of the shop, which would be as much as twelve or fourteen feet from the stove. What makes it certain that the fire could not have originated from any defect in the stove is, there was no fire in it from Saturday night; and the stove was cold when Mr. Hoddor left after closing.

There was no one in the shop, or, no one who had any business there, on Sunday but Mr. Hoddor’s boy, and that was about eight o’clock in the morning.

There appears to be no doubts whatever  but that the fire was the work of an incendiary; but who the scoundrel is yet remains a mystery. A jury was empaneled on Tuesday last, and an investigation proceeded with, before Dr. Clark, coroner, and is yet going on, privately. A great many persons have been examined, but no evidence has been adduced which will criminate anyone.  If any important is brought before the jury, we will make it known in our next issue.

Where to find them

The old customers (and as many new ones wish) of those of our merchants and business men who were compelled to move on Sunday night, on account of the ‘extreme heat’ will find them at the following places, for the present, where great bargains may be expected.

Trewin will be found in the store lately occupied by EB Wilcox, one door west of Wigg & Son’s furniture warerooms.

Dr. Deans will be found in the shop next door north of Taylor’s jewellery store.

Wm. Dickie will be found in the shop between Trewin’s and Gillett Bros.

JF Willox will be found up stairs, over W Lang’s store, one door west of Steele Bros.

JP Johnston will be found in part of H Wilkinson’s boot and shoe store, three doors east of Black’s hotel, till further notice.

R Fitchett will be found, on or after Monday next, in part of Keddie & Rice’s new store.

JJ Hall will be found at present at Hindes’ Hotel, where he will shave you as clean as he ever did.

Geo. Garth will be found in the place lately occupied by Mrs. Finney, next door to Shaw’s boot and shoe store.

J Barnard will be found two doors east of Black’s hotel.

JO & RH Henry will be found in the old stand, Simcoe St., next door to the Reformer Office.

The other parties have not, as yet, secured places.

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The Month That Was – November 1947

 

Nov, 1, 1947

POLICE NAB 3 IN $137,000 PAYROLL RAID
Boston, Nov. 1 (AP) – An escaped convict who jumped out of a fourth floor window in a drawn gun police chase was captured today and held for questioning with two other former prisoners in Boston’s day-apart payroll raids in which hooded gunmen snatched a total of $137,000.

George Hayes, 30, who broke out of State’s Prison Sept. 19, was taken after injuring himself gravely in a leap from a suburban Cambridge apartment house, police reported.

Another former convict was arrested in the same apartment building a short time later, making three ex-prisoners now held in connection with a Tuesday robbery of $29,000 from two firms.

Patrick Farina, third man arrested since the hold-ups, was charged with armed robbery in the $108,000 raid at the Sturtevant Division of the Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

 

Smashed Fence Most Serious Hallowe’en Prank
Chief of police Owen D. Friend said today that he “has seen a good many worse Hallowe’ens” and added that some of the acts reported were nothing more than childish pranks while others were criminal offenses against the public.

Possibly the near-full moon spreading its cool light over the countryside was a reason for Oshawa’s comparatively quiet 1947 Hallowe’en Police were a little busy but firemen had no calls and Fire Chief Westley R. Elliott remarked today, “I cannot remember when we last when through a Hallowe’en without a false alarm.”

Probably the most expensive breakage was done to a concrete and wooden fence recently constructed by Harry Cowley, 293 Gilddon Avenue. It was pure vandalism that resulted in damage estimated by the owner and police at nearly $100. Mr. Cowley said he had just completed the fence about ten days ago.

B. W. Haynes, 39 Park Road North, reported that a summer house in the backyard had been overturned. Although lifted clear of its foundation last night, it did not suffer extensive damage.

City fireman L. R. Little, 82 Oshawa Boulevard, said some destructive scalliwags tore part of the eave trough right off his house. “Just say,” jokingly quipped Mr. Little within hearing of the other firemen, “that I may suspect of my fellow workmen.”

Detenbeck’s Men’s Shop, King Street East, and Fred Guscott’s plumbing stockroom, 21 Church Street, received somewhat identical treatment when their windows were marked; the former with soap and Mr. Guscott’s with grey paint.

Rotten tomatoes and cucumbers were freely thrown about the property of Charles Carpenter, 215 Park Road South, and street lights along the unpopulated section of McMillan Drive were broken.

Motorists driving through the intersection of Mary and Hillcroft Streets last night were obliged to break down a tinny barrier of empty cans which caused a lot of noise and a few loud exclamations but no damage.

Chief A. J. Pierce of the East Whitby Township Police force reported the only damage he had investigated was the breakage of several large cement tile, the property of the Township.

 

DEER AT GOLF CLUB
Seventeen – year – old Jack Penfound, 39 McLaughlin Boulovard, strolling over the Oshawa Gold Club property yesterday afternoon, was surprised to see a buck deer springing across the links toward the west. He said it disappeared down around the creek bed. “It had beautiful antlers.” The boy stated.

 

Nov, 8, 1947

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The Month That Was – October 1862

All stories were reported in the Oshawa Vindicator.

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October 1, 1862, Page 2

The War
Washington, Sept 26 – The governors of the following states arrived here this morning from Altoona, OA, viz: Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Michigan, New Hampshire, Indiana.

The last named (Indiana) was represented by Col. Rose.

Between 12 and one o’clock the governors of the states above named had an interview of an official character with President Lincoln…

The governors were courteously and kindly received, and their suggestions listened to with close attention by the President.

It is ascertained from those who had the best opportunities for knowing that there was no proposition made at the recent conference at Altoona, nor even a suggestion ventured, touching the removal of General McClellan, or was any proposition of suggestion made as to the promotion of General Fremont to the head of the army, or as to the future disposal of that gentleman.

 

Cincinnati, Sept 29 – Gen. Jefferson C. Davis shot Gen. Nelson at the Galt House, Louisville, this morning, killing him almost instantly

All business was totally suspended in this city yesterday, from 2 till 5pm, all the citizens being under drill. The turn-out was large.

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Hall’s Factory Burned!
It becomes our painful duty to announce the total demolition of the well-known Woollen Factory owned by Mr. Samuel Hall, located just north of Oshawa, and occupied by Mr. Geo. Brook.  It took fire it is not known how, near midnight on Monday evening, and in short time the building, and all the valuable stock and machinery, were reduced to a heap of ashes and smoking ruins.  Two men or horse-back were sent to Oshawa to give the alarm, and the fire engine and a lot of the men went out and did good service in assisting to save the property in the neighbourhood of the factory from the devouring element.

We learn that Mr. Hall had an insurance for $7,000 on the building, and the stick and machinery was insured in about $4,000.

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October 15, 1862, Page 1

To Abolish Fruit Stealing
As we grow older (and more charitable?) we are the more included to imagine that the stealing of fruit springs from an ignorant, heedless sportiveness, rather than from deliberate wickedness.  They who steal have never learned how much time and labor it costs to raise fruit; and seeing it in tempting plentifulness around, they think it can harm nobody very much if they take a little.  We do not justify this, nor do we depreciate the use of legal suasion at times; but would not a little moral influence and tact also be well? –American Agriculturalist

 

October 15, 1862, Page 2

Reception of Lord Monck at Whitby
Whitby, Oct 6th, 1862
The passage of His Excellency the Governor General through Whitby was seized upon by the laymen of the town and county as a suitable opportunist for the display of their attachment to the Mother Country, and their gratification at the assumption of the government of the Province by the present popular representative of Royalty. It became known that Lord Monck should be at the Whitby Station about one o’clock pm, and for some time before that hour men, women, and children began to wend their way thither.  A platform had been erected for His Excellency’s reception, with a canopy which was decorated with evergreens; a large motto proclaimed “welcome” to His Excellency, and several flags added to the gaiety of the scene. The Stouffville Brass Band discoursed sweet music before and during His Excellency’s stay. About a thousand persons were present, many of htem leading men from different parts of the County.

 

October 22, 1862, Page 2

Sudden Death
On Wednesday last, Mr. Daniel Robinson, living on lot No. 2 in the 9th Concession of East Whitby, came to Oshawa with a load of wheat. When within 2 ½ miles of his home, in returning, he was taken with terrible pains in his breast and stomach, and turned into the house of his brother-in-law, Mr. John McCullough.  As his condition did not improve, his wife was sent for, and on the following evening, sad to relate, his sufferings were relieved by death. He was a steady and industrious man of about 40 years of age, and leaves a wife and family to mourn over their sudden bereavement of their chief dependence and mainstay in life.

The Month That Was – September 1929

The Month That Was – September 1929
The Oshawa Daily Times
Governor-General to Visit Oshawa on September 16
Edition 04 September 1929

Viscount Willingdon, Governor-General of Canada, will pay an official visit to Oshawa on Monday, September 16, the city council was informed at its meeting last night. A special committee has been named to make arrangement for the civic reception to the Governor-General.

On his official visit, Viscount Willingdon will be accompanied by Vis-countess Willingdon and by several members of his staff, the official communication received by the council stated. The party will arrive at the Canadian National depot by special train at 10 o’clock Daylight Saving time, Monday morning, and from 10 o’clock to noon will be entertained by the city. At noon Viscount Willingdon will be the guest of R. S. McLaughlin at luncheon at Parkwood, and in the afternoon will make a tour of the local plants of General Motors.

 

The Oshawa Daily Times
Helped Him
Edition 04 September 1929

“You know, Dad, he always said he’d never marry until the right girl came along.”
“Well, how does he know you are the right one?”
“Oh, I told him I was.”

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The Oshawa Daily Times
GOODYEAR ‘BLIMP’ VISITED OSHAWA THIS AFTERNOON
Edition 04 September 1929

Took Series of Motion Pictures and Photos from the Air

Oshawa was visited this afternoon by the dirigible of the Goodyear Tire Company, the now well-known “blimp” coming on here from the Canadian National Exhibition, where it was taking part in today’s air circus. On board the dirigible was a party of photographers and camera men, who took a series of still and motion pictures of the General Motors plant as seen from the air. After circling over the city for a short time, the big airship turned round and returned to Toronto, where it is making its headquarters for the next few days. The pictures taken from the air today are to be used in Chevrolet sales promotion work throughout Canada in the near future.

 

The Oshawa Daily Times
DRUG TRAFFICKERS HAVE MANY TRICKS
Edition 04 September 1929

CARRIER PIGEONS USED TO TRANSPORT SUPPLIES OF DOPE

New Methods- Many Private Houses Are in the Guise of Clubs

Montreal – Behind closed doors and heavily curtained windows bogus West End night clubs are again selling liquor after hours and catering for drug addicts.

Following certain rumors of their renewed activities, I determined to find what really was happening in the West End, which after midnight is supposed to be drinkless. But the new proprietors are cautious – newcomers are not welcomed as in the old days.

 

The Oshawa Daily Times
New G. M. C. Building for Oshawa
Edition 07 September 1929

ERECTION OF NEW PARTS AND SERVICE BUILDING TO START IN TWO WEEKS

Wrecking of Three Houses on Site of New Building, Bond and Mary Streets, Has Already Started – Tenders Close Next Friday on the Building

H. A. Brown, General Manager of G. M. C. of Canada, Announces That Unit Will Probably Be Completed About January 1

A new parts and service building will be erected immediately by General Motors of Canada, Limited, it was announced this morning by H. A. Brown, vice-president and general manager of the company. The building will be erected on the north-east corner of Bond and Mary streets, immediately west of the present parts and service building.

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Pictured from left to right: John H. Beaton, general sales manager of General Motors of Canada; Geo. E. Amsely, sales manager of McLaughlin-Buick Motor Car Co.; H. A. Brown, vice-president and general manager of General Motors of Canada; Charles H. Ricketta, manager of the McLaughlin-Buick factory branch in Toronto; and R. S. McLaughlin, president of General Motors of Canada.

The Oshawa Daily Times
Highest Award for Local Poultryman
Edition 07 September 1929

John Thomas Wins Grand Championship Prize at C. N. E.

Whitby, Sept. 7. – The grand championship for the finest bird on display at the poultry show of the Canadian National Exhibition has been awarded to a barred rock cockerel owned by Constable John Thomas of the Whitby police force. This year constable Thomas displayed ten chickens at the poultry show and besides the high honor mentioned above his chickens have been awarded three first and two second prizes and the challenge shield for the best display of barred rocks.

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The Oshawa Daily Times
FIREMEN ROUTE ANGRY HORNETS
Edition 07 September 1929

Insects Were Attacking Pedestrians on Centre Street

“How doth the bust bee improve each shining hour?” is a question asked in a familiar ditty which was answered yesterday for local people by a number of hornets, which if not bees, may be at least regarded as near relatives. These particular hornets had built a nest in a tree in fornt of the residence of Dr. C. E. Wilson, Centre street, and they knew how to improve each shinning hour. Individual members of the colony took great delight in bussing down from the nest and attacking pedestrians as they passed along the street. The infirm, the aged and the very young were not spared and it was remarkable the impetus which pedestrian traffic received through the application of a few hornet stings. They did not complain to the police but laid their troubles before the fire department.

The local brigade is called upon to do many unusual things even though there are no Doukabhors in Oshawa who may require a soaking with streams from a fire hose as in Nelson, B. C. But Chief Elliott’s department is equal to any emergency and the fireman immediately prepared to make war upon the hornets. Instead of rushing to the scene with bells ringing and sirens blowing they crept up quietly on the unsuspecting insects. The nest was located and promptly set on fire.

The Month That Was – July 1867

The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 03 July 1867
NOTICE.
Columbus

THE ANNIVERSARY of the Columbus Bible Christian Sabbath School will (D.V.) be held on Sunday and Monday, the 7th and 8th of July.

On Sabbath two sermons will be delivered, at 2 1.2 and 6 o’clock p.m., and collections taken up.

On Monday the children will meet at 1 ½ and the exercises will commence at 2 o’clock p.m., and continue for two hours. Tea will be served to the children at 4 o’clock, and to the public immediately after. Tickets 25 cents; for children not members of the school, 12 ½ cents. The public are cordially invited. A good time may be expected.

 

The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 03 July 1867
Confederation Day

The first morning of the New Dominion was ushered in Oshawa with the ringing of bells and the firing of cannon, including a salute from the guns of the juvenile battery. The chief occupation of all seemed to be to make preparations to leave town. The greater portion of the population went to Whitby, others to Toronto, and a few Eastward. The afternoon here was one of unusual quietness. The numerous flags flying from flagstaffs and private houses was the only mark of the day. Everyone store was closed and every workshop was silent, and Oshawa was literally the deserted village. The few people that had not left in the morning wended their way to Cedardale to a private picnic, where the afternoon was heartily enjoyed. In the evening the Ontario Bank and some other buildings were illuminated. The people of Oshawa having agreed to give way to Whitby and join in the celebration there, strictly kept her faith.

 

The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 03 July 1867
Coalition

Our beloved queen has entrusted the formation of the first cabinet which is to govern the Dominion of Canada to Sir. J. A. McDonald (sic) and we doubt not that. Her advisers were careful before he left England to impress upon him the advisability of having all sections of the country fully represented therein.

We have every reason to believe that Sir John has since the Coalition of 1864 full realized, the importance of the work in which he has taken so active apart, and that he has aimed to bring it to such a conclusion as every true patriot would deserve.

Now, while we cannot endorse his past career, and though we have energetically opposed the Tory party of which he was the leader in the past, we are quite open to believe that he, together with the rest of us, sees in the prospects of the new Dominion a future worthy of a statesman; that he is willing to waine considerations of minor party importance – and taking his stand upon a constitution – itself the outcome of a fusion of party hitherto antagonistic, to devote himself to the … administration of the laws of Canada, for the benefit of the whole country.

 

The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 10 July 1867
The Trees

On Saturday night one of the finest and largest trees in Centre street was broken off by the wind. Upon examination, the cause of this was easily discovered, the three having been much injured at the place where it broke off by chafing against the guards. Numbers of others are in the same condition. Some remedy ought at once to be adopted. The most of the trees are now firmly enough rooted to do without the guards, and these ought to be removed. Where this cannot be done with safety, the trees ought to be secured from injury with bandages.

The Road and Bridge Committee are now taking action in the matter. The law, however, give the owners control of the trees opposite their property. It would be well if they exercise their right to look after them. The village has planted and protected the trees thus far, and it is not too much to ask property owners to do the little that remains to be done.

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The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 10, July, 1867
Mowing Match

One of the largest trials of movers ever held in Canada, was held in the Township of Fullarton, Country of Perth, a few days ago. Nine machines took part in the competitions, five of them being varieties of the Ohio pattern. The machines were tested upon these points: lightness of draught, quality of the work done, and quality of material and style of workmanship upon the machine. After a thorough test and examination of each of these particulars the Ohio Combined Reaper and Mover, manufactured at the Joseph Hall Works here, was awarded the first prize, as being the best made, having the best material, being the lightest draught, and having the closest and neatest work of any machine upon the ground. About a thousand farmers witnessed the contest, and the manner in which they followed the Hall machine whilst at work, and the strong commendations bestowed upon it afterwards showed they heartily agreed with the judges – This adds another to the long list of first prized which these machines have obtained in fairly contested fields.

 

The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 24 July 1867
Mr. Gibbs Meeting in Oshawa

Mr. Gibbs held a meeting of his friends on Saturday evening. Nearly three hundred rate payers were present. Several addresses were delivered by the most prominent men of the town. A unanimous vote pledging Mr. Gibbs their support of the meeting, moved by Mr. Cowan and seconded by Mr. Glen, was passed. The most enthusiastic feeling prevailed. It is pretty clear what the result will be in Oshawa.

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The Oshawa Vindicator
July, 1867
MARRIED

In Oshawa, on the 17th last, by the Rev. L. B. Caldwell, Miss Sophia Maria Graham, of Whitby, to Mr. Will Clarke, of Pickering.

At Colbourne, July 16th, BY Rev. Mr. Lomas, Bowmanville, the Rev. D. Simpson, Primitive Methodist Minister, formerly of Oshawa, to Miss Mary Grace Barrett, of Bruse Mines, Algoma District.

By Rev. G. Abbs, of the “Christian Advocate,” at Palermo, June 15, 1867, Rev. W. Pirrette, of the Brooklin M. E. Church, and Grand Worthy Patriarch of the Sons of Temperance of Canada West, to ALvina L. Winehell, of Palermo, formerly of Barringon, Mass, U.S.

 

The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 31 July 1867
Devil Worshippers

This singular race, called the devil-worshippers, who dwell among the Koorde, numbers about one hundred thousand, and are from and ancient Persian race. They speak the Koord’s language. Their symbol is the Peacock, an image of which they worship at their sacred shrine. They are largely under the control of their priests, who teach them that it is essential to manhood to lie, steal, murder, and be a dog. To kill someone is necessary to become a man.

To sin on quietly because you do not intend to sin always is to live on a reversion which will probably never be yours.

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The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 31, July, 1867
United Grammar and Common Schools, Oshawa

Wanted for the above, A FEMALE TEACHER for the Primary Division. Salary $220 per an.

Also, a Female Teacher for the Senior Division of the Female Department; one capable of teaching French and Drawing preferred.

Applications, with testimonials &e., to be forwarded to the undersigned, not later than 10th August.

  1. Carswell,
    Secretary

 

The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 31 July 1867
What is Soda Water!
ATKINSON’s Drug Store

Soda water is pure water highly charged with Carbonic Acid Gas. This gas exists in great purity in marble. In extracting it, vessels capable of resisting great pressure, 100 to 200 pounds to the inch are required.

The New York Board of Health says: “we regard Soda Water (Carbonic Acid Gas in water) as the only innocent drink of all the mineral waters in use.

Dr. Maxwell of Ouloutts, remarks: “In the treatment of Cholera I found Soda Water both grateful and beneficial.” This kind of Soda Water you can only obtain in its true purity and strength at ATKINSON’s Drug Store.