Panoramic Photographs: From Past to Present

By Kes Murray, Registrar

Working in an archive, you come across some interesting objects. One of the most interesting objects that I’ve come across are panoramic photographs.The archival collection at the Oshawa Museum has a quite a few, ranging from scenery to group photographs. As I am a very curious, I started to wonder about how early panoramic photographs were made…

The Past

Early panoramic photographs were tied to the development of the daguerreotype, the earliest form of photography. Multiple daguerreotypes were taken so that the individual images would overlap. After, you simply place the photographs next to one another and you would have a panoramic, although a little broken up. The example from the Library of Congress shows how an early panoramic photograph would look.

Black and white panoramic image. It appears as though it is a series of five images, side by side. it is showing an early city scene
Behrman, Martin, Copyright Claimant. San Francisco, from Rincon Hill. United States San Francisco California, ca. 1910. Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2007660578/.

Towards the end of the 19th century, the first panoramic cameras were made. In 1897, Multiscope & Film introduced the Al-Vista camera. This camera stayed still as the lens moved 180 degrees. In 1899, Kodak introduced the No. 4 Kodak Panoram camera. This Kodak camera, like the Al-Vista, stayed stationary as the lens moved along a spring. The No. 4 Kodak Panoram had 142 degree angle of view.

In 1904, Kodak manufactured another panoramic camera called the Cirkut. Unlike their previous No. 4 Panoram where only the lens rotated, the Cirkut camera itself rotated, allowing a 360 degree view. This camera became popular with commercial photographers, as it allowed large group photographs.

Although the Cirkut became popular, it produced a distorted view. Since the Cirkut rotated 360 degrees, curved scenes came out looking flat. This is best seen in a panoramic photograph I took of our three houses. If you have been down to visit us, you know that the walkway from Guy House to Robinson House in straight. However, the panoramic I took makes it look like the pathway curves. This is, again, because I had to rotate the camera and thus the photograph becomes misleading.

Colour photograph of three houses. It is panoramic, so the landscape is somewhat disorted, and it is winter with no leaves on trees.
The Panoramic I took January 12 2023. This photograph shows how panoramic photographs can distort images.
Sepia toned photograph of a streetscape. It is a panoramic photo resulting in the buildings appearing distorted
Another great example of the distorted view panoramic photographs came make. View of Simcoe St., from Simcoe St. United Church, (south) to the old City Hall, Simcoe St. N., and King Street from the four corners, East to the Old Post Office, circa 1913. Oshawa Museum archival collection (A981.20.1)

To correct this distortion, photographers would position groups in a curve, so that the photograph would make the group look like they were standing together. The 116th Ontario County Battalion panoramic photograph example shows how this would look like.

Sepia toned photograph of a group of people lined up, wearing uniforms. There are trees and fields in the background as well as white tents. The photo is a panoramic so it is very long
Positioning a group in a curve can correct the 360 degree distortion. 116th Ontario County, Overseas Battalion C.E.F. Niagara Camp July 14th 1916 taken by the Panoramic Camera Co Toronto. Oshawa Museum archival collection (A981.20.2)

The Present

Today, many of us have panoramic camera in our pocket. Our panoramic photograph setting on our phones function the same way as panoramic cameras of the early 20th century, physically rotating the camera along 360 degrees.

Thanks for coming along this panoramic journey with me!


Sources:

https://collection.sciencemuseumgroup.org.uk/objects/co8084582/no-5-cirkut-camera-panoramic-camera-rollfilm-camera

https://content.lib.washington.edu/panoramweb/history.html

http://www.earlyphotography.co.uk/site/entry_C110.html

http://www.earlyphotography.co.uk/site/entry_C105.html

https://www.loc.gov/collections/panoramic-photographs/articles-and-essays/a-brief-history-of-panoramic-photography/#:~:text=Shortly%20after%20the%20invention%20of,plates%20side%2Dby%2Dside

https://mikeeckman.com/2016/10/kodak-no-1-panoram-kodak-1900-1926/

https://mymodernmet.com/history-of-panoramic-photographs/

Blog Look Back – Top 5 Posts of 2022

Happy New Year! Throughout 2022, we shared 61 articles on the Oshawa Museum Blog, showcasing many different stories from our city’s past. 

We’re planning our new and dynamic posts for 2023, but to start the year, let’s look back at our top 5 posts of 2022:

Black and white photograph of a brick house. There is an orange banner overlaying the photo, with text reading "Top 5 blog posts 2022"

Oshawa’s Newspapers, Past and Present

By Lisa Terech, Community Engagement Preparing for our latest Sunday FUNday event at the Oshawa Museum, our first in person event since February 2020, brought me down the rabbit hole of newspapers. To celebrate Archives Awareness Week, I wanted the Sunday FUNday to be archives related, so newspapers were a good theme. We were able…

Profiling: George Kenneth Lancaster

By Sara H., Summer Student As my summer at the museum is wrapping up, it has been the perfect time to reflect on my time at the museum and how much I have learned about museums and Oshawa’s history.  My last blog post talked about past industries in Oshawa that were featured on the  Discover…

The Ocean Wave

By Jill Passmore, Visitor Experience Coordinator In the early years of the twentieth century, a man named Jack O’Leary owned the New Lunch/O’Leary’s Restaurant at 37 King Street West in Oshawa – between the Commercial Hotel and the coal yards at Centre Street. Behind this small restaurant, a semi-permanent, Trabant/wipeout style of carnival ride existed, a…

Street Name Stories – the ‘Knitting’ Streets

By Lisa Terech, Community Engagement Those who know me know that I’m an avid knitter. In fact, in the past I’ve written a blog post about a WWI Sock knitting pattern, I’ve examined some of Oshawa’s early woolen industries, and I’ve done a deep dive into one of those industries, the Empire Woolen Mills, available…

These were our top 5 posts written in 2022, however, for the FIFTH year, our top viewed post was once again Keeping Warm: The Ways The Victorians Did! This post was originally written in 2016 and has been the top blog post every year since 2018. The desire to know about foot warmers and window coverings must be strong with our readers!

Thank you all for reading, thank you to the OM staff, students, and guest authors who helped create content for the blog, and we hope to see you again through 2023!

Wilson & Lee Music Store: The 100 Year Anniversary

By Alicia Tkaczuk, Durham College Intern

Stepping into Wilson & Lee as a child I remember the awe and excitement that I felt, staring up at walls of beautiful, sparkling guitars in an amazing variety of colours and styles, and walking through rows and rows of CDs and vinyl records of every genre you could think of. The store had everything a music lover could want or need, and, if they didn’t, the Wilsons would go above and beyond to get it for you.

Being at Wilson and Lee was always an experience, even if you were just dropping by for something quick and simple. The friendly, helpful, and fun atmosphere of the store felt like visiting a friend more than a store. However, that friendliness didn’t detract from the professionalism of Wilson and Lee in anyway. It’s likely that the fact that Bill Sr., Bill Jr., and Dave Wilson all dressed in suits and ties every single day of their careers lent itself to their air of trustworthiness and expertise.

I was always so excited to go to the music store with my dad for many reasons, but in no small part because at the end of every visit, Dave would lean across the counter, conspiratorially, and open his hand within which would lay nestled a guitar pick or little music themed eraser. For most of my childhood, I had a mason jar on my dresser that I added to after every visit with a new colourful, shiny, or sparkling music store trinket.

Sepia image of a truck loading a piano onto a front porch. The piano is covered in a sheet, and there are four people in the photograph
William George Wilson and Mary Lee receiving a piano at his home on Albert street. Photo from Wilson family collection. Image from: https://chronicle.durhamcollege.ca/2017/01/music-lives-wilson-lee/

The history of Wilson and Lee goes back long before my tiny feet crossed the threshold, but I am sure it had a similar impact on most of its customers over the nearly ten decades that it was in business. The store was opened in 1922 by William George Wilson and his sister-in-law Mary Lee and went on to be run by three generations of the Wilson family. Wilson and Lee had the distinction of being the longest running music store in all of Canada, having kept its doors open for an impressive 97 years. William came to Oshawa from Toronto to work at the Williams Piano Factory. William was blind and had trained at the CNIB (Canadian National Institute for the Blind) to be a piano tuner.

William and Mary’s partnership had its very early beginnings when she began to drive him from job to job tuning pianos in people’s homes. Through doing this, William realized a business opportunity, and he began to purchase, recondition, and resell pianos from his own home. However, as one can imagine, he quickly began to run out of room, at which point he and Mary opened the first location of Wilson and Lee. In the new store, William and Mary added player pianos and piano rolls, gramophones, and record players to their inventory.

Black and white photo of a storefront. The store sign reads "Wilson and Lee, Pianos, Gramaphones, Radios"
The storefront of Wilson and Lee’s first location in Oshawa. Photo from Wilson family collection. Myers, Jasper. Image from: https://chronicle.durhamcollege.ca/2018/12/oshawas-iconic-music-store-closes-in-on-century-mark/

William’s sons all joined in the family business early on. His eldest son, Bill Sr., started in 1933 before leaving to serve in the Second World War from 1939 to 1946. The next oldest brother, George, came to work in 1938, and youngest brother Ed joined the ranks in 1942 when their father passed away. Mary Lee continued to work alongside her nephews after William passed.

In 1953, the brothers bought the lot at 87 Simcoe St. N. and built the store where Wilson and Lee remained until 2019. The three brothers ran the store together until George’s retirement in 1989; at this time, the torch was passed to the next generation of Wilsons. Bill Sr.’s sons, Bill Jr. and Dave, had worked at Wilson and Lee since they were teenagers. Bill Jr. came to work as a high school student in 1953, while his younger brother Dave joined the family business in 1967 at 14 years old.

Colour photograph of a streetscape. On the left hand side, Wilson and Lee Music Store can be seen.
Simcoe St N at William St looking South late 1970s. Wilson and Lee can be seen at the left of the image. Oshawa Museum archival collection

In 1995, Ed Wilson retired, and in 2002, Bill Sr. hung up his hat – sort of. He would still come into the shop three times a week, in his suit and tie, to pick up his copy of Oshawa Weekly and maybe, just maybe, to check up on things. Bill Sr. was still calling his sons nine years after he retired to see if they needed his help down at the store. Bill Sr. passed away in July 2011 at the age of 94.

The Wilsons weathered the ebbs and flows of the economy over their ten decades in business, surviving the Great Depression, a World War, and numerous recessions. They showed great adaptability in their business model as the way we experience music changed so drastically throughout the 20th century.

Colour photograph of the exterior of Wilson and Lee Ltd. Music Store. There is a grey car outside the shop
Exterior of Wilson and Lee, c. 1986; Oshawa Museum archival collection

In the ’50s, the store installed six record booths so that customers could sample their records before making a purchase. They also made the shift from pianos as their big seller to accordions, banjos, violins, and of course the electric guitar as rock n’ roll music took off in the ’50s and ’60s. Other shifts they witnessed were 8transitions through the era of gramophones to records players, the brief competition between cassette tapes and 8-tracks, the advent of CDs, and the resurgence of vinyl records.

Bill Sr.’s sons stayed with the family business for eight more years before deciding to retire and close the doors to Wilson and Lee in December 2019. The brothers were honoured with a Lifetime Achievement Award and inducted into the Oshawa City Music Hall of Fame in April 2020, a wonderful acknowledgment by the community for the dedication of the Wilson family to modern quality products and service with a personal touch, which will be their lasting legacy in the story of Oshawa.


References

Carter, Adam. “One of Canada’s Oldest Music Stores Shutting down Just Shy of 100th Anniversary.” CBC News, September 15, 2019. Retrieved on November 9th, 2022 from https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/wilson-and-lee-music-closing-1.5284620    

Crimi, Crystal. “Saying Goodbye to a Long-Time Oshawa Businessman.” Oshawa Weekly, July 27, 2011. Retrieved on November 9th, 2022 from https://www.mykawartha.com/news-story/3452265-saying-goodbye-to-a-long-time-oshawa-businessman/

Myers, Jasper. “Oshawa’s Iconic Music Store Closes in on Century Mark.” The Chronicle. December 12, 2018. Retrieved on November 9th, 2022 from https://chronicle.durhamcollege.ca/2018/12/oshawas-iconic-music-store-closes-in-on-century-mark/

Szekely, Reka. “Music to Stop Playing at Oshawa’s Wilson and Lee after 97 Years.” Toronto Star, September 12, 2019. Retrieved on November 9th, 2022 from https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2019/09/12/music-to-stop-playing-at-oshawas-wilson-and-lee-after-97-years.html

Williams, Jared. “Music Lives on at Wilson & Lee.” The Chronicle. January 25, 2017. Retrieved on November 9th, 2022 from https://chronicle.durhamcollege.ca/2017/01/music-lives-wilson-lee/

YouTube. YouTube, 2020. Retrieved on November 9th, 2022 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VbiJILe8fI.   

The Month That Was – November 1917

Canadian Statesman, 4 Nov 1917, p. 5
Local and Otherwise
A Grand Masquerade Carnival will be held at the Oshawa Roller Rink next Tuesday night, Nov. 6th, See large bills for list of prizes. Doors Open at 7pm. Admission 25c, skates 10c extra.

Churches
The Jubilee services of Simcoe-st Methodist Church, Oshawa, on Sunday Oct. 21 will long be remembered as an event of great importance and interest.

Newspaper ad for the Military Service Act
Port Perry Star, 8 Nov 1917, p. 8

North Ontario Observer, 22 Nov 1917, p. 2
Union Mass Meeting
Wm. Smith, Esq., ex-MP Unaniously Nominated
Meeting Large and Enthusiastic

Whitby, Nov. 17 –  Nomination as Union candidate to represent South Ontario in the Dominion Parliament was offered to an accepted by William Smith, ex-PM (sic) for the riding, at a meeting called to choose a Union candidate, held in Whitby this afternoon. There was a large attendance made up of adherence to both political parties, and on the platform were men who in the past have been lively and even better opponents. F.L. Mason, Warden of the County, was chairman. The names in first nomination comprised almost as many liberals as conservatives, and were: William Smith, ex-MP, Columbus; FL Fowke, ex-MP, Oshawa; Dr TE Kaiser, Oshawa; Dr. Captain James Moore, Brooklin; George McLaughlin, Oshawa; Robert M Holtby, Manchester; Col. JF Grierson, Oshawa; Peter Christie, Manchester. All withdrew except Wm. Smith, and on motion of Dr. TE Kaiser and Col. JE Grierson, the nomination was unanimously offered to Mr. Smith, amid prolonged and enthusiastic applause.

Mr. Smith, in a kindly and amiable address, accepted the nomination and put himself up on record as in hearty accord with the principles the motives of the motives of the Union Government. He sympathized with those who were called upon to give up the sons to this awful struggle for human liberty, but there was no other way to in victory. The Military Service Act was inevitable when voluntary recruitment failed. He pledged his loyalty and hearty support to the union government, if elected.

Black and white photo of W.E.N. Sinclair, who was nominated as the Liberal Party Candidate in 1917
Port Perry Star, 22 Nov 1917, p. 1

Canadian Statesman, 29 Nov 1917, p. 2
Oshawa Boy Pays Price
Mr. A.A. Crowle, Oshawa, has received the following telegram:

“Deeply regret to inform you 745947 Pte. Delbert Crowle, Infantry, officially reported died of wounds, 44th Clearing Station, November 3, 1917, gunshot wound head.” Pte. Crowle enlisted with the 116th Ontario County Battalion. He went overseas on July 20, and reached France on 20th October, 1916. He was on active service until the 4th of May, 1917, when he was wounded. He was in England until September 1st, when he again returned to the firing line. Delbert was well known in Oshawa being born there 22 years ago, attended school, and was his father’s able assistant in the Luke Burial Company’s office when he enlisted. Capt. Garbutt, of Simcoe Street Methodist Church, held a memorial service Sunday evening to the memory of the deceased soldier.

Page 5
Local and Otherwise
Ernest Drinkle, Oshawa, was fined $5 for allowing his son to remain out of school. We see boys of school age too often on streets during school hours.

The Ontario Reformer, November 30, 1917, p. 4
The Late JO Henry

There passes away at his home on King St. east, Inst. Thursday afternoon, a member of a well known family in this County, in the person of Mr. James Orrin Henry.

He was one of the first exporters from Canada of apples to the British market, where his brand of fruit remained popular for many years. He was in his 86th year. As one of the pioneers of this locality, he had a large circle of acquaintances and many relatives.

He was the first of the twelve sons of the late Elder Thomas Henry, who was a local preacher of reputation 50 years ago. Elder Henry, along with Barton stone, founded the Christian Connection Church of Canada. Mr. Henry retired from his business 26 years ago. He is survived by two sons, Mr. EN Henry, who is a member of the Oshawa Exemption Tribunal, and Dr. Frank Henry, of Oshawa. He was a life-long Liberal and a Methodist. He was twice married. His first wife was a daughter of Samuel Hill, a pioneer of the district, and his second wife, Miss Carrie Major of Port Perry.

The funeral took place Saturday afternoon at 3:30 and was largely attended, interment taking place in Union Cemetery.

Note: James was the sixth of eleven sons for Thomas Henry, not fifth of twelve as reported.

Newspaper ad for Henderson Bros., New Linens for Xmas
Ontario Reformer, November 30, 1917 Page 12

The Ontario Reformer, November 30, 1917, p. 9
Archie Law Killed in Action
Word was received Wednesday morning of last week that Lance Corpl. Archie Law, one of Oshawa’s brightest and best known young men was “killed in action” on Oct. 30th. He enlisted in Montreal with the late Will Garrow, Will Bowden, Walter Hobday and Will French, in the Princess Patricias, and they went overseas Sept. 4th, 1915. He had not been wounded before, although he was in the hospital for a short time with a throat disease incurred by drinking bad water. All of these boys have been put out of the fight. Two have paid the supreme sacrifice. Will Bowden is a prisoner in Germany, Will French was wounded, and not being able to go back to the trenches, is being used as a bombing instructor in England. Walter Hobday returned to Canada incapacitated for further service a couple of months ago, bringing with him a bride from England.

Archie Law lived with his sister, Mrs. McAndrews, and father, William St. He also has five young brothers. His mother died when he was three years old, and was working for Luke Bros. when he enlisted. He was a member of Simcoe St. Church and S.S., and a good living boy who made friends wherever he went. He was expecting a six weeks’ leave to visit friends to Ireland at Xmas time.

Page number not specified
“Tanks” Pass Through Oshawa

On Tuesday afternoon the armoured tank, three armoured cars and the armoured motor cycle, which are being used in Canada in promoting the sale of Victory Loan Bonds, passed through Oshawa on the C.P.R. The tank, which is in charge of its own crew from the front, is like a huge tractor, and travels by means of two endless chains, on the caterpillar style. It is about 25 ft. long and about 10 ft. high. On account of the short notice given of their arrival but few were at the station to see them go through.

The Month That Was – October 1870

Oshawa Vindicator, October 5, 1870, page 1

For Sale
A Brick House, 36 x 24, 2 ½ stories high, with stable, shed, driving house, &c., connected to the Lot on which they stand, being 58 square perches, the property of John Robinson, Port Oshawa. Terms liberal. Apply to either Ralph Robinson, Oshawa, or John Thompson, Paitley Mills, Whitby.

Newspaper ad for Weaving at Columbus
Oshawa Vindicator, 5 October 1870, page 1

Page 2
Whitby and East Whitby Fair
Every preparation is being made by the directors to make the Fall Fair to be held here on the 26th, better than any that has preceded it. Fifty three dollars have been collected in the town, as special prizes for equestrianship. Two of these are a portrait valued at $15, to be given to the best lady rider, and one valued at $8, to the best lady equestrian under fifteen years of age, both presented by Mr. JE Hoitt. The prizes for equestrianship have been divided into four classes, three prizes being offered to young ladies under 15, and three to boys under 16 years of age. Several new prizes have been offered in the photographic department, for the purpose of inducing a strong competition. Mr. J Porter offers for special prizes of $18, for suckling colts after Sir Walter Scott. The bills have been issued to the several directors and can be had of them.

Newspaper ad for Walter Wigg & Son, furniture & undertaking
Oshawa Vindicator, 5 Oct 1870, p 3

Died
In Oshawa, on the 4th inst., Louisa, wife of JB Warren, Esq., aged 64 years. The funeral will leave the residence of her husband for St. George’s Burial ground, at 3pm to-morrow (Thursday).

Newspaper ad for Wolfenden's Marble Works
Whitby Chronicle, 6 Oct 1870 p4

Oshawa Vindicator, October 12, 1870, page 2
As the funeral of the late Mrs. Warren was on its way to the St. George’s Burial Ground Thursday, it was met by the waggon of the Dominion Telegraph Company, which frightened some of the horses. In the fright, the carriages were backed upon each other, and one, that of Mr. Burk, of Bowmanville, was forced into the ditch and broken.

Mr. W. Rundle has a bill against the town of $17.50 for damages done to his horse by a broken street crossing. The hole is repaired now.

Wanted
A first-class servant girl, two kept in the family. Good wages given. Mrs. JO Guy. Port Oshawa, Oct 10, 1870

Newspaper ad for George Gurley's tailoring business
Oshawa Vindicator, 12 Oct 1870, p 3

Whitby Gazette, October 13, 1870, page 2
The Harvest of 1870
The following is the annual report of the GTR officials of the harvest in this locality: …

Oshawa – hay, very light and not an average crop; Wheat, very light crop, average not over 10 bushels per acre; Barley, average 15 bushels per acre; Peas, average 20 bushels per acre; Oats, an average crop; root crops good; Quality of grain very fine, having been secured in splendid condition.

Oshawa Vindicator, October 19, 1870, page 2
The schooner Kate, of this port, was blown ashore in the gale Monday night, near Cobourg. She was loaded with barley belonging to R & A Smith. The grain was insured. No one was lost.

In the same blow, a schooner loaded in the harbor carried off posts and a portion of the wharf to which she was fastened.

By the New York papers we see that Mr. Carswell is keeping up his old time reputation in that city. He leaves soon on a lecturing tour in the Southern States, under the auspices of the National Division of the Sons.

Stolen or Strayed
From Lot 6 2nd Concession East Whitby, on the 2nd Oct., a RED COW, with white spots on left hip and left shoulder, with star in her forehead, three years old. Anyone returing the same will be liberally rewarded.
Sarah Terry, East Whitby, Oct. 18, 1870

Newspaper ad for Atkinson's Drug Store
Oshawa Vindicator, 19 Oct 1870, p 3

Whitby Gazette, October 20, 1870, page 2
Masonic Charts – We have received from Dr. Vars, of Oshawa a sett of masonic charts, copies of which should be in the hands of every “brother of the mystic” in the country. The charts are magnificently engraved, and cleanly and neatly printed and, besides illustrating the different grades and forms of Masonry, are beautiful ornaments for the parlor at home. Parties can be supplied with the charts by Dr. Vars, Oshawa, or at this office.

Newspaper ad for hats
Whitby Gazette, 27 Oct 1870, p 4

Oshawa Vindicator, October 26, 1870, page 2
Oshawa Fire Brigade – The following offices were duly elected at the regular annual election for 1871:

Brigade Officers – PH Thornton, re-elected Chief Engineer and Treasurer; Jos. Craig, Assistance Chief Engineer; R. Dillon, Brigade Secretary

Fire Co. Rescue No. 1 – Thos. Hall, Captain; R. Burdge, 1st Lieut; T. Kirby, 2nd Lieut; B. Robinson, 1st Branch; E Martin, 2nd Branch; ——- Best, 3rd Branch; W. Trewin, Sec’y; T. Lukes, Treasurerl T Hern, Steward.

Hose Co. Rescue No. 1 – O. Manuel, Captain; G. Graham, 1st Lieut; J Mitchel, 2nd Lieut; Ed. Nickle, Sec’y; Geo. Wilson, Treasurer.

Dreadnought Hook & Ladder Co. – Geo. Kelly, Captain; C. French, Lieut; A. Cameron, Treasurer. Sec’y not elected.

All members in connection with the Oshawa Fire Brigade, are requested to meet at the Fire Hall to-day, at one o’clock, sharp. They will muster in the evening at the appointed time to form a torchlight procession, (weather permitting).

Newspaper ad for Village taxes to be paid
Oshawa Vindicator, 26 Oct 1870, p 3

Whitby Gazette, October 27, 1870, page 2
DEATH OF DR. ROLPH
Dr. Rolph died at Mitchell on Wednesday afternoon of last week, at the advanced age of 78 years. As his name and efforts have been very intimately connected with the history of Canada, it is but right that his death should receive more than a passing notice. He was a man of most excellent parts –in science and the law, as well as in politics. Referring to him, a contemporary, the London Free Press, says: He was a reformer that always had a “policy,” and the downfall of the family compact was due, in a great measure, to his exertions. Being implicated in the rebellion of 1837 intentionally or by mistake…, but after the subsidence of political troubles returned to it, and entered the government in 1851 under Mr. now Sir Frances, Hincks. During his day he aided in the settlement of the Clergy Reserves difficulty; saw Reciprocity gained; was present at the birth of the Railways in Canada; and witnessed Upper Canada rise from the condition of a wilderness to the dignity of a nationality. In later years he established the Medical School, in connection with the Victoria College, and labored assiduously and with much success as it Principal. He was a man of kind heart, and a sound head. His natural abilities were great, but were heightened by a wide culture. As an orator his eloquence was proverbial, and no man of the day was listened to with more pleasure and instruction by the people than the “old ma eloquent.” The flow of his language was steady and uninterrupted, his articulation sweet and distinct, and he always made a deep impression.

His life has been a most useful one ; devoted to his fellow-creatures rather than to himself, and his memory will be dear to all that knew him or were acquainted with his career. Since 1856 he has not taken any active prominent part in political affairs, though his counsel was not neglected. He leaves behind him an honored name an unblemished reputation, which will long live, and with may make the wise prevail, upon recounting his history, that there were more like “good old Dr. Rolph.”

Newspaper ad for Lowes & Powells
Whitby Gazette, 27 Oct 1870, p 4

Page 2
THAT EARTHQUAKE – On Thursday morning last, between the hours of ten and eleven o’clock, Canada was visited by a slight shock of earthquake. The “quake” appears to have visited nearly every place in Ontario and Quebec, (if we are to believe the telegraph reports.) and to have shaken several towns in the United States. At Greenwood village, the shock was felt by Mr. Fred Meen, in his store, and by Mr. Samuel Green, while a person a few years distant in a hotel was entirely ignorant that there had been an earthquake. Again, some men working in a barn, a mill or so from Greenwood, were terribly frightened at the shaking of the building, and ran out, fearing it would fall. The shock appears also to have visited Whitby, and – a telegram to the Toronto paper affirms – lasted from three to five minutes. This startling item may be true, but, after diligent inquiry, we have not found the first person that knew a word about the earthquake, until the Toronto papers were received on the following morning. Nevertheless, the report MAY be true ; and of such be the case, the people of Whitby ought to be ashamed of themselves, to have a real live earthquake in their midst and to be ignorant of its whereabouts. It is really too bad. Where, we ask, were the police? We will candidly admits that, at the time mentioned, there was a good deal of shaking in town; but we really thought it was caused by the Court of Assizes, then in session. Most assuredly there was staggering, but, honestly, in our innocence, we believed that rot-gut played a lone hand in it. But we may have been mistaken, and a real earthquake might have been with us. If so, we are really sorry that we didn’t know.

Married
On the 19th inst., at the residence of the bride’s brother, in East Whitby, by the Rev. Dr. Jeffers, John S. Larke, Esq., publisher and editor of the Oshawa “Vindicator,” to Miss Elizabeth Baine, of Oshawa.

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