Month That Was: June 1927

All news articles have come from The Oshawa Daily Reformer

Seven Nurses Awarded Diplomas
Edition 11 June, 1927
Colourful Scene as Seven Nurses Receive Diplomas and Award at Hospital Graduation Exercises
…Seven young ladies who during the past three years have labored faithfully and devotedly in the training school of the Oshawa General Hospital, receive last night their diplomas as graduate nurses. Held in the assembly hall of the Collegiate Institute, the graduation was marked by a profusion of floral beauty and delightful ceremony. Presentation of the scholarships and prizes won by the graduating and undergraduate members of the training school followed the awarding of the diplomas. The address to the graduating class was delivered by Dr. F. N. G. Starr, of Toronto and he charged them that they uphold the spirit of their profession and make their careers what the great Lister has called “glorious occupations.” Gordon Conant, chairman of the hospital Board of Directors presided and in the absence of J, D, Storie, president of the Board, presented the diplomas.

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Cars Wrecked in Highway Crash
Edition 11 June, 1927
Three Autos Figure in a Collision at Liverpool on Kingston Road
Three cars were smashed in a mix-up in front of the Liverpool Hotel at Liverpool this morning A Dodge car driven by W. R. L. Blackwell, of Toronto, struck a Whippet motor car owned by S. J. Jackson of Toronto, which suddenly pulled out on the highway in front of it.

The Whippet was thrown a considerable distance on to the front of the car of William Anderson, of Dunbarton, smashing the radiator of the Anderson car. The Dodge was badly damaged as well and the Whippet was a complete wreck. Jackson has been charged by the Provincial Highway officer with reckless driving. All of the drivers escaped without any serious injuries though Jackson was badly bruised.

 

Teeth a Menace, Experts Discover.
Edition 29 June, 1927
Carnegie Foundation Asserts Most Risk Comes Through Mouth
New York, June 29 – Teeth are more apt to become defective than any other part of the body, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching reported Tuesday after a six year study of dental education in Canada and the United States.

“Disease germs that enter the body through decayed teeth, or along the side of the disordered teeth are frequent causes of such serious and common maladies as rheumatism, kidney trouble and heart failure,” the report aid.

“In 1924, of the 135,640 officers and men in the United States army – who, as a group are presumable among the healthiest persons – 12,507 were treated for dental disability.”

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Well Known Stars Coming to New Martin Theatre Monday
Edition 11 June, 1927
John Gilbert and Renee Adoree Both in “The Show” Coming To Regent Monday
John Gilbert and Renee Adoree, the combination that scored one of the screen successes of history in “The Big Parade,” are together for the first time since that picture, in “The Show,” Metro-Goldyn-Mayer’s sensational romance of the Budapest underworld, coming Monday to the Regent theatre.

They play the central characters in a strange romance laid in a mysterious sideshow on the outskirts of the “invisible city” – a sideshow of illusions, magician’s tricks and strange grotesques, with a “decapitations” illusion in which Gilbert has his head cut off in a “Salome” travesty as the central feature. Tod Browning, director of “The Unholy Three” and “The Road to Mandalay,” directed the story, from Waldemar Young’s adaptation of the Charles Tenney Jackson novel.

The settings, including the grotesque sideshows, with their floating living heads, mermaids, “spider women” and other startling illusions are realistic to the extreme, whole blocks of reproductions of quaint Budapest streets and other incidentals being used in the gripping mystery story.

Gilbert plays a swashbuckling sideshow “barker” and Miss Adoree a Salome dancer in the production, with Lionel Barrymore as “The Greek,” a sinister gangster leading, and Edward Connelly as the old blind man who eventually brings about an astounding climax.

 

A Lasting Memorial
Edition 11 June, 1927
There is in Oshawa a general agreement with Mayor Preston’s suggestion that the celebration of the Diamond Jubilee of Confederation should be marked in permanent fashion by the erection of a fountain in front of the way memorial. It is to be hoped that this idea can be carried to a successful conclusion.

Not only will the installation of a fountain do away with the frog pond in front of the memorial, but there is also a peculiar appropriateness in having a fountain beside that beautiful monument. Water running continuously from a fountain suggests that the recollection of those in whose honor the memorial was erected, never ceases, that they are never forgotten, that they are, indeed, in the “Garden of the Unforgotten.”

By all means, let us have the fountain. It is also suggested that benches be plentifully supplied in that park. This too, should be looked after. That beautiful spot should be made more beautiful still and every opportunity should be seized to make it in every respect as attractive as possible. “The Garden of the Unforgotten is a shrine. The whole place should be made as restful, as peaceful, and as appropriate as it can be made.

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Red Cross Cottage To Be Formally Opened Wednesday
Edition 11 June, 1927
Was Completed at a Cost of More Than $3,00 to Rotary Club While General Motors Donated Duco for Painting Cottage and Chas. Bowrs Donated Wiring – Cottage Will Be Available for Outing for Crippled and Under-Privileged Children
The Red Cross Cottage erected in Lakeview Park by the Rotary Club will be opened on Wednesday, June 15. On this occasion the Rotary officials will hand over to the Red Cross officials the documents establishing the right of the Red Cross Society to use the cottage absolutely free of cost so far as the Rotary Club is concerned. It is the intention that the Cottage will be available as an outing for crippled and under-privileged children. It will mean an enlargement of the work that has been carried on in the past by the Red Cross in smaller and less suitable quarters.

The Cottage is a creditable addition to Oshawa’s institutions. While it has been mainly financed by the Rotary Club, General Motors of Canada through Rotarian Gordon LeFebvre have been most generous in painting the whole of the exterior with Duco and Rotarian Charles Bowra, has provided the electric installation. The work was undertaken at an expense of over #,000 to the Rotary Club has been made possible by the street fair conducted by the Rotary Club last summer with such successful results. Some work yet remains to be done in the construction of a stairway to the water’s edge and other structures f a minor nature but after the opening on Wednesday it will be ready and available for the purposes of the Red Cross.

 

The Oshawa Daily Reformer
Roof Caught Fire
Edition 11 June, 1927
Fire started on the roof of the home of John Cameron. King and Charles streets at ll.10 this morning. Sparks from the chimney started the blaze which was quickly extinguished by the fire department without any serious damage being done.

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Student Museum Musings – Durham LIT Students

Their semester has wrapped up, but before they were finished, two students from the Durham College Library & Information Technician program shared their experiences as interns at the Oshawa Museum.  Here’s what they had to say.

Jenn

As part of the final year at Durham College’s Library and Information Technician program, I am at the Oshawa Museum completing field placement hours. I have had the opportunity to work on the museum’s newest publication – The Annotated Memoirs of Rev. Thomas Henry. I got thrown onto this project as a sort of “happy accident:”  I was originally slated to be working in the archive, but help was needed elsewhere.

The book is being annotated by Laura Suchan, Executive Director of the Oshawa Museum, and Stoney Kudel, president of the Oshawa Historical Society. I have been designing the overall layout of the book.

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A973.13.1 – Elder Thomas Henry

As an out-of-town student, working on this book has been my introduction to the history of Oshawa and the Henry family. I can’t begin to say how much research has gone into this publication. On my part, it was mostly because I was unfamiliar with a lot of the stories that I was reading about, and I wanted to relate what was happening in Oshawa (then East Whitby Township) to what I knew about the history of Ontario and Canada as a whole.

The museum is fortunate enough to have a lot of the Henry family’s history. I’ve had the opportunity to search through letters, early censuses and photographs, all in the sake of finding information for this book. I’ve enjoyed learning the different histories – being told to sit down and do research has been a dream these past few months.

Unfortunately, with the semester ending, I am finished my internship at the museum, and as of now, the book is not yet complete, though it should be soon. I look forward to seeing how all the work we’ve done comes together in print.


Amanda

I’m a firm believer in what we learn from our past will guide us in the future so history has always been a huge interest of mine. Learning about how an archive and museum are run in class was fun, but actually getting to come into the archives and be able to see and touch history with my own two hands was another experience all together. From my time at the archives I was able to see the real behind the scenes of how an archives is run and operated daily. Through the task I was assigned I got to see what it was like to actually go through a donation and learned the value of recording everything. I also got a chance to see just how much time one project can take. From going through the newspapers, clipping, photocopying, and encasing them it took around 19 hours. With how little staff and money is usually given to archives you can see how much one person needs to do.

I’m very grateful for the experience! and now when I go to museums/archives I will truly know the value of them, not just from a preserving history stance.


Thank you to Jenn and Amanda for sharing their stories!

Want to know more about our Winter Semester post-secondary students? Jenn, Peter, Sarah, and Elora introduced themselves in an earlier post!

Month That Was: May 1929

Bank of Toronto Opens Branch
May 1st 1929
The Bank of Toronto, one of Canada’s leading financial institutions, has opened a branch at 19 Simcoe street south. Established in 1855, this is the oldest Canadian bank with the head office in Ontario, and during 73 years of careful and conservative banking, it has accumulated a surplus of more than $14,000,000 over all liabilities to the public.

The Oshawa branch has excellent facilities for handling savings and commercial business. The equipment installed includes a safety deposit box department.

F.S. Potter, assistant manager of the main office in Toronto, has been appointed manager. He brings with him years of banking experience gained in various branches of the bank throughout the country.

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Farmer Children Must Pay Fee to Go to School Here
May 2, 1929
Whitby, May 2. –The farm assessment dispute between the farmers residing within the town limits and the town council has shown no new developments during the past few days. The farmers still maintain that they will carry their grievance before the Ontario Railway and Municipal Board while the town council has taken no action to change the bylaw which was passed last month under which farm properties will be allowed no other tax exemptions.

 

Treatment May Surpass Insulin
May 2, 1929
Springfield, Ohio, May 2- A new treatment for diabetes, which it is alleged may prove more efficacious than insulin, was announced before the Ohio Academy of Science recently.

Dr. C. A. Mills, of the laboratory of experimental medicine, University of Cincinnati Medical College, told the medical science section of the academy that experiments he made in China and America led him to believe vitamin “B” extract, a vegetable product, not only had the same property of controlling diabetes as insulin, but likewise curative properties. Vitamin “B” is obtained from alfalfa, sweet clover, onions, bran and other plants.

 

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Oldest Hippo in U.S., 75 Dead
May 2, 1929
New York, May 2. –Mrs. Murphy, dowager hippopotamus of the United States, is dead at the Central Park Zoo.

She was 75 years old -The first hippo to be brought to this country- and her demise is thought to have been due to old age.

“The old lady has been feeble and ailing all winter”, said Keeper Harry Kinney. “We were prepared for some such sad eventuality. Her teeth were all worn down, and her hay had to be chopped for her. But she kept her appetite to the last. Only Monday she ate 60 pounds of chopped hay, 30 quarts of mash made of bran, rolled oats, three or four vegetables, and several loaves of bread. Then she drank about half her tank.”

Mrs. Murphy is survived by her only son, Caliph 2nd, who occupies an adjoining cage.

 

Charlie Chaplin’s Former Wife to Be Questioned
May 11, 1929
Los Angeles, Calif., May 11. – William A. Bryne, investigator for the state Board of Medical Examination, announced here last night that he would again question Mildred Harris, former wife of Charles Chaplin, in an attempt to learn more about the associates of Miss Delphine Walsh, dancer, who died recently as the result of an alleged illegal operation.

Bryne also declared he was trying to locate “a wealthy Vancouver yachtsman whose name had been brought up for investigation.”

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Many Mishaps to Pickering People
May 11, 1929
Four Placed Under Medical Care by Accidents

Pickering, May 11 – Four accidents occurred to local people during the last few days, all of them causing the patients to undergo medical treatment.

Mrs. R. Irish, had the misfortune to injure her foot last week, and was under doctor’s care, but is not able to be about again.

While at work in W. C. Reid’s butcher shop, where he is employed, John Liscombe, cut his first finger rather badly one day this week, and has since been nursing a very sore hand. The bone as well as an artery was affected, but the injured digit is responding to medical treatment.

Word was received in the village this week of the misfortune of Master Gerald Foster, of Dunbarton, who fell from a tree while adjusting a swing, and sustained a broken arm. Until quite recently the Foster family resided in the village, and Gerald was a familiar figure among the boys. His old playmates are glad to know that he is making a good recovery.

A badly sprained ankle, the result of a fall, has caused Mrs. A. Bayes, a great deal of pain during the past week, but at the present time it is rapidly improving.

 

Children’s Aid Shelter to Cost About $50,000
May 11, 1929
Work Expected to Start Early in June, Says Architect

Plans for the Children’s Shelter which will be erected by the Children’s Aid Society of this city, are well under way. The Times was informed today by C. C. Stenhouse, architect. It is expected that a tender call will be made in about two weeks for the general contract on the job, and that work will be started early in June.

A Tentative estimate on the cost of this building has been made at $50,000, according to O. M. Alger, superintendent. The shelter will be erected on the east side of Centre street, south of Rotary Park, where eight acres of land have been donated to the society by J. D. Storie.


For more newspapers from May 1929, visit our online newspaper database, on Canadian Community Digital Archives

 

Archives Awareness Week: 1867/1967

By Jennifer Weymark, Archivist

This article originally appeared on the Durham Region Area Archives Group website to celebrate Archives Awareness Week. This annual event, held across Ontario from April 3-9, 2017, is designed to raise awareness of the many resources that can be found in archival collections around the province.


This year marks the 150th Anniversary of Confederation. The year will be filled with celebrations, retrospection and imagining where this country will be in another 150 years. To begin the celebration, member institutions of DRAAG have looked through their holdings to find the most interesting item from 1867 and 1967 in their collections!

On August 26, 1867 an Oshawa resident by the name of T.N. Gibbs received a telegram from John A. Macdonald.  The telegram is rather significant, not only because it was sent by Canada’s first Prime Minister, but it talks about the first election after Confederation.

Gibbs was not new to politics but this election would be his most notable. He ran against Reformer backed George Brown and Liberal John Sandfield Macdonald.  While Gibbs won, it was widely accepted that he do so by corrupt practices.

Gibbs was the only successful Conservative candidate in this area.  This meant that he acted as the local confidante for Sir John A. Macdonald. So much so, that we have another little note sent to Gibbs by Macdonald in our collection.

A960.19.5

A960.19.5 (60-D-19); from the archival collection of the Oshawa Museum

Canada celebrated the 100th Anniversary of Confederation on a large scale. Locally, Oshawa joined in on the celebrations as well. Between beard growing contests, NHL exhibition games and special performances, the City marked the anniversary in a prominent way. Students in Oshawa schools spent a good part of the school year preparing for a Centennial Celebration held at the Civic Auditorium. The program included songs and dances, art work and projects that highlighted the differences between life in Oshawa in 1867 and 1967. The grade 7 and 8 students from E.A. Lovell School actually put on a performance showing the differences in physical training in 1867 and 1967. In the archives, we have the binder that was developed to outline all of the activities Oshawa schools engaged in related to the Centennial.

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Be sure to visit the Durham Region Area Archives Group website to see what gems are in archives from around our Region and to learn more about local archives!

Month That Was: April 1947

All news articles have come from the The Daily Times-Gazette

Tuesday April 1, 1947
Ayrshire Breeder In District Make First Shipment to China
First U.N.R.R.A. shipment of its kind from Canada, 12 head of topflight Ayrshire cattle, are rolling west by rail from here today on the first lap of the long haul to China.

Hermitage Farms, Pickering, owned by E. L. Ruddy and Son, was the key assembly point yesterday afternoon as the thoroughbred livestock where herded up the ramps into trucks in preparation for two-month trip. Three thousand miles away, a China-bound ship is waiting in Vancouver harbour for the Ontario shipment.

Arranged by the Dominion Department of Agriculture, this transfer of livestock to U.N.R.R.A. for relief of China’s decimated herds will be followed by further deliverers from other Ontario centres.

In addition to seven bulls and two heifers bred at Hermitage Farms, yesterday’s included one bull from Albert Cooper’s Netherhall Farms, Brooklin, one bull from F. G. Carswell’s farm, Brooklin, and one heifer from Cluaran Farms, owned by Charles Robson, of Oshawa.

“It’s the first sale of cattle to U.N.R.R.A. from Canada,” said Robert Ruddy, waiting for the trucks to arrive. “I think the last shipment to China like this was 14 years ago,” he added.

U.N.R.R.A. specifications were “very high”, Mr. Ruddy explained. Bulls had to be between 12 and 14 months of age and cows had to have a butter production record of 500 pounds per year running as far back as the granddam.

Mr. Ruddy said the livestock would be used for breeding purposes in China, where every phase of the economy has been riddled by ravages of invasion and civil war.

Nearly 300 applications had flooded in to U.N.R.R.A. headquarters when the agency called for men to accompany the Ontario shipment all the way to China. No one from the district had been chosen as far as Mr. Ruddy knew.

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The first shipment of its kind from this area, a shipment of 12 thoroughbred Ayrshire cattle from Hermitage Farms, Pickering; Netherhall Farms, Brooklin; F. G. Carswell’s Glen Carswell farm at Columbus and Cluaran Farms, Oshawa, is rolling toward the west coast today on the first lap of its journey to China. The shipment which was arranged for U.N.R.R.A. by the Dominion Department of Agriculture, was assembled at Hermitage Farms and loaded yesterday. The nine bulls in the shipment, left to right are: Glen Carswell Peter Pan, from the Glen Carswell Farm; Hermitage Double Burton, Hermitage Lustre General, Wallabrae Buster Earl, Hermitage Royal Charlie, all from Hermitage Farms; Brooklin Danny Boy, from Netherhall Farms; Hermitage Coronation Master, Hermitage Lord Douglas 3rd and Hermitage Lucky Noble Art, from Hermitage farms. -Photo by Campbell’s Studio

 

April. 8, 1947
AUTHORIZE CEDARDALE PLAYGROUND
Cedardale is to have its long awaited playground.

On motion of the city council last night, authorization was given to the east portion of the former Coulter property being used as a playground so long as it is not required by the city for any other purpose. Authorization was also given for the Board of Works to do the necessary grading.

The property, now owned by the city, is the site of the former Coulter Manufacturing plant and runs from Simcoe Street to Ritson Road south of the Skinner Co. plant. The portion for the proposed playground is that nearest Ritson Road.

Pointing to the need for a playground in this area, Recreation Director R.L. Coleman said it was hoped it could be put into use this summer. The site, he said, is large enough to be useful of all types of activities including sports and outings for the large industries in the area.

Mr. Coleman said the property would accommodate a hard ball diamond, there being no other diamond of this kind south of King Street. He outlined the south-east corner as the part of the new park most suitable for the children’s play area.

Tried to Pick Fight with Police
George R. Kirtley, East Whitby, was fined $5 and costs or five days, on a charge of disorderly conduct, to which he pleaded guilty in Magistrate’s Court this morning. It was pointed out that the accused had no previous record.

Constable Harvey testified he and constable Harry King were trying to stop an argument between several fellows in front of the Woolworth Building on King Street West, about 1:25 a.m. Sunday when the accused came out of the New Service Lunch and intervened.

“The accused tried to pick a fight with us when we were busy breaking up the other argument,” the officer said.

Kirtley in his own defence started that he had been drinking, but not to excess that night. He was only striking up for his friends and not trying to pick a fight with anybody.

CANCER CASES ON INCREASE V.O.N SAYS
Statistics produced by the supervisor of the Victorian Order of Nurses, Miss Edith Hill, at a regular monthly meeting on the V.O.N. executive here yesterday afternoon, show there is a vast increase in the number of cases if cancer and pneumonia in this city. Cancer in the city has risen to five cases as compared to one last year at this time.

During February, the nurse’s report said, a total of 70 admissions were made; visitations were 432; and fees received were $153.50. During March this year there were 75 admissions; visitors 468 and fees amounting to $176.50.

Miss Downey, a graduate of the public health nursing course at the University of Toronto, is taking her practical training with Miss Hill at the present time.

At yesterday’s meeting Alderman Clifford Harmon was appointed council representative on the Victorian Order of Nurses executive board here.

It was also resolved that W.E.N. Sinclair, K.C., M.P., be asked to represent the local V.O.N. branch at the 49th annual meeting of the Board of Govenors of the V.O.N. of Canada to be held in Ottawa, April 29 and 30.

 

April. 15, 1947
Quick Action Saves Child From Water
The quick action of Mrs. Harry King, Ritson Road North, saved three-year-old Marie Taylor from possible drowning this morning when the child fell into a cellar for a new house which contained two or three feet of water.

Mrs. King, who resided on the east side of Ritson Road North, two houses Rosedale Avenue, noticed an object in the water in the cellar which is just north of her house. Going out she found a little girl in the water and without delay went into the water and rescued her.

Marie, who lives in Toronto and was visiting her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. O’Donnell, 334 Ritson Road North, is now none the worse for her experience.

Neighbors said this was not the first time children had fallen into the water in the cellar.

Good Nickel Chocolate Bar Needed
By The Canadian Press
What Canadians want is a good five-cent chocolate bar, a Canadian Press survey showed today.

Most citizens questioned agreed with C.C.F. leader M.J. Coldwell who pleaded in the House of Commons yesterday for a return to the five-cent bar. He raised the question in commenting on the recent price increase which hiked the wartime six-cent bar to eight-cents.

The survey showed that while the average Canadian kid will go for his chocolate bar regardless of price, his more money conscious dad is beginning to smit loud squawks of protest. In some localities the price boost led to increased supplies while others noted no change in a candyless situation.

One curious feature was a wide divergence in reports of sales, Toronto reporting a 50 per cent drop in sales volume and other cities, notably Winnipeg, reporting sales of all supplies available. Some points said it was too early to note any difference in the week since the increase went into effect.

Montreal reported there was a slight dropping off in sales but most adults were buying all in sight. Dealers anticipated a further decline in sales as supplies increased. Ottawa confectioners looked to an easing in the supply situation while they reported customers were getting more “choosy” at the higher price and inclined to take only what they considered the better bars.

Toronto dealers took an optimistic view and said that when customers got used to the idea of the eight-cent bar they’d start buying again.

In the West, while complaints were frequent and there was some decrease in sales, dealers generally reported selling all they had on hand.

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April. 29, 1947
City Buys Snowloader
Purchase of a snowloader for the city was authorized last night by the City Council while tenders for a caterpillar tractor to be used in connection with the proposed sanitary land fill system of garbage disposal was referred to the city engineer for his recommendation.

The snowloader, complete with overhead loader and bulldozer blade, will be purchased from the General Supply Co. of Canada for $4,663.

Tenders from four firms were received for the tractor and after the city clerk had read the lengthy technical descriptions embodied in these it was moved the City Engineer W. Dempsey study them and bring a recommendation as to the most satisfactory. The price ranged from $6,020 to $7,270.