The Month That Was – July 1864

All articles originally appeared in The Oshawa Vindicator

July 6, 1864, Page 1

Great Improvement in Canadian Politics and Politicians
There are some things occurring in Parliament which we notice with great satisfaction. 1st. The very magnanimous and dignified positioned assumed throughout the present extraordinary crisis by the late Lower Canada Premier, Mr. Dorion.-That gentlemen fully conceded the right of Mr. Brown or any other to act as he thought best for the country, entirely irrespective of past political or party relations, or of individual claims. This is high and patriotic ground. The country first; parties and individuals afterwards. Such a course will not hurt Mr. Dorion, who may be truly called the Bayard of Canadian politics, – the chevalier sans peur et sans reprochee.

Page 2

From Sherman’s Army
New York, July 1. The Herald’s correspondent with Sherman, under date 22nd ult. Says of the battle of Kenesse on the 17th: Heavy skirmishing opened, and towards night the rebels commenced firing fiercely. Bradley’s and Bridges’ batteries were brought to bear upon them with considerable effect, and Logan and Blair’s batteries also fiercely shelled their weeks. Hooker having repulsed them, was pressing forward while Schofield was swinging around their left, capturing many prisoners. Soon heavy musketry firing was heard, and the rebels made repeated onslaughts upon the position our troops had taken from them, but were repulsed each time.

Closing Taverns
Section 44 of Mrs. Dunkin’ Temperance Act provides that no sale of liquor, except for medicinal purposes or to travellers or boarders, shall take place at any hotel between the hours of nine o’clock on Saturday evening and six o’clock on Monday morning. This is not so stringent a provision as war formerly the law, but if it is carried out strictly, will be productive of some good at least, while the law, as it has herefore stood, has been very generally violated. We are informed that it is the intention of our Village Constable to see that the new law, with reference to sales after nine o-clock, is strictly enforced.

Oshawa School Board
On Wednesday, of last week, and adjourned special meeting of the school board took place, for the purpose of deciding upon the tender out in by Messrs. George Edwards and William T. Dingle for the erection of the addition to the school house.

July 6, 1864, Page 3

Page 4

Idle Girls
The number of idle, useless girls in all of our large cities seems to be steadily increasing. They lounge or sleep through the morning, parade the streets during the afternoons and assemble in frivolous companies of their own and the other sex to pass away their evenings. What a store of unhappiness for themselves and others are they laying up for the coming time, when real duties and high responsibilities shall be thoughtlessly assumed. They are skilled in no domestic duty-may they despise them; have no habits of industry, not taste for the useful. What will they be as wives and mothers? – Alas, for the husbands and children, and alas for themselves! Who can wonder if domestic unhappiness or domestic ruin follow! It is one of the world’s oldest maxims, that idleness is the nursing mother of all evil and wretchedness. How sadly strange is it that so many parents – mothers especially – forget this, and bring up their children in dainty idleness. They are but sowing the wind to reap the whirlwind.

July 13, 1864, Page 2

Bridge Broke Down
On Friday evening last, as Mr. John Bone was crossing the bridge near the tannery, just below the dam of Grans’ mill-pond, with a load of flour, one of the braces of the bridge gave way at the tenon, causing the bridge to break in two at the centre and precipitate Mr. Bone, with his team, wagon and flour into the stream beneath. The way was not deep, but horses, flour and driver were considerably injured by the fall. Very fortunately Mr. Bone escaped without broken bones, but got his leg sprained, and came very near being crushed under the weight of the barrels, two of them falling one on each side of him.

Unfortunate Children
On Thursday evening last, three of Mr. John Clifford’s children, two boys and a girl, were convicted of stealing iron from Mr. Arkland’s premises, and sent to Jail at Whitby, to await their trials at the next […]. Subsequently some of their friends entered bail for their appearance at court, and they were allowed to return home. It would be a mercy if they were sent off, after trial, to the Reformatory for a year or two, to give them time to overcome the propensity to which they have repeatedly shewn such a remarkable partiality.

Letter from a Canadian in the War
About a year ago the youngest brother of the editor of this journal, a lad of about 17 years, crossed the lake to Rochester to visit some friends, and finally, attracted by the $700 bounty, enlisted in an artillery regiment and went to Elmira. Here he was transferred to the 1st N.Y. Veteran Cavalry, and received the appointment of the Corporal in Co. C. As soon as the regiment- an old one- had fully recruited and drilled its raw reinforcements, it was sent to join Gen. Sigel’s command, at Martinsburg, Va., some twenty miles north west of Harper’s Ferry. Since that time he has been in all the battles under Sigel and Hunter.

July 20, 1864, Page 1

Another Great Display of Falling Stars Expected
The writer of this was among the fortunate few who witnessed the wonderful shower of meteors in the night of Nov. 13, 1833. Being at a large boarding-school, it enhanced that some of the boys caught sight of the fiery rain, and the around the whole school. For an hour to two we sat watching the sublime spectacle with mingled interest and awe. The sky was constantly lighted with hundreds of stars, shooting forth from the neighbourhood of the senith, and streaming across the heavens; each leaving a bright streak in its track that has gradually faded away.

Page 2

The War
The rebel raid into Maryland has come to an end, and is now found to have consisted of only about 15,000 troops. If its object was to capture Washington by a surprise, the involvement was a failure. But if it was merely a foraging expedition, it was exceedingly successful, for while we have accounts of an immense quantity of plunder going towards Richmond, we have not the first word of either rebels or plunder being captured by the […] of Hunter and Sigel, who are supposed to be in pursuit of the retreating columns.

The New Temperance Act
Through the kindness of Mr. Dunkins, M.P.P. we have been enabled to public, in full, in advance of all our contemporaries, the temperance act of 1864, generally known as Mr. Dunkin’s Bill. The Act is two distinct parts. The portion which we published last week, is that which provides for complete prohibition of the retail traffic in intoxicating liquor in any municipality wherein a majority of the electors are in favor of such prohibition, and furnishes the machinery for carrying out the prohibition and rendering it effectual.

July 20, 1864, Page 3

July 27, 1864, Page 2

Physical Exercise
The position of children in school is most unfavorable to sounds lungs, healthful bodies, and grateful forms. Stewart says – “A variety of exercises is necessary to preserve the animal frame is vigor and beauty.” Spursheim appropriately remarks, that “Children are shut up, forced to sit quiet, and to breathe a confined air.” This error is the greater, the more delicate the children, and the more premature their mental powers; and a premature death is frequently the consequence of such a violation of nature. Bodily deformities, curved spines, and unfitness for various occupations and the fulfillment of future duties, frequently result from such mismanagement of children.

A Public Park
A respectably signed requisition- embracing forty tolerably influential names- has been presented to the Reeve asking him to call a public meeting for the purpose of considering the propriety of securing a plot of ground, by the issue of debentures, to be used as a public park for the village, for all time to come. In response, the Reeve has called a meeting for the purpose, to be held at the town hall on Saturday evening next, commencing at half past seven o’clock.

Do Not Kill the Frogs
All night long these musical little fellows are busy singing; a few moments, and they stop to eat the larvae of insects so rabidly bred in stagnant waters. Frogs are clean animals, and love clean water, but they subsist mainly on insects. Would you kill a frog when he sings for you part of the time and spends the rest of the night in destroying mosquitoes, gnats, flies, or the eggs, are resting or deposited in the plants by the water pools? Toads in the garden are estimated as worth five dollars even to the gardener for they are constantly, night and day.

July 27, 1864, Page 3

The Science of Homemaking

By Grace A., Summer Student

In May of 1930, The Oshawa Daily Times cut the metaphorical ribbon on Oshawa Collegiate’s new technical wing with a thirty-page special edition paper. The headline read “What Technical Education Means to the Youth of Oshawa,” implying, of course, that the opening of a vocational school meant opportunity. Industry-based learning was intended to prepare students who wouldn’t be attending university for direct entry into the trades. For boys, this meant taking courses in Motor Mechanics, Drafting, Woodworking, Electricity and Blue Print Reading. The curriculum was designed by the city’s most prominent industry men. With their vast knowledge and resources, the program was state-of-the-art. Across the hall, the young girls of Oshawa were also thinking about their future. That is, as Miss V. I. Lidkea, Head of Household Science, put it – “their life work of matrimony.”

“Some of the Special Vocational Department Classrooms,” Oshawa Daily Times (Oshawa, ON), May 7, 1930.

Lidkea’s program was one of many educational opportunities which emerged in the early twentieth century that was specifically designed for girls. Home Economics was a response to the question of how women’s work might be able to adapt to industrial society. Through technical training, young girls would learn the science behind sewing, cooking, laundry, home nursing, and the management of household appliances- and it was a science. At Iowa State College, women could receive a degree in homemaking after completing rigorous courses in physics and math, as well as instructions on electric circuits and household equipment. The ideal 1930s housewife could not only use an oven, but she could take it apart and put it back together again too. Despite their proficiencies in a multitude of technical subjects, it was clear that female students would be directed towards homemaking. Perhaps the question that economists actually meant to ask was, “how can we industrialize women’s labour while maintaining the idea of separate spheres?”

In the one-page feature, “Oshawa Girls Will Take Courses in Home-Making Arts,” Lidkea specified what technical education meant for the girls of Oshawa. Like the boy’s program, Oshawa Collegiate’s Homemaking Arts courses were created for girls who would not be pursuing further education. In a rather progressive effort, Lidkea assured readers that the girls would also be given the skills to meet the needs of industry. If a student decided to contribute to the family income through waitressing or nursing, she would be considered a competitive candidate. She would be able to earn a wage, regardless of whether she was single or married. (Lidkea explained that statistics showed both single and married women were working those days.) Above all, girls could use their education to improve the standard of living in their household. She would be a more efficient cleaner, launderer, cook, and dressmaker. She would run her home like a factory. Thus, the opening of Oshawa Collegiate’s technical wing seemed to walk the line between women’s work and economic activity. Was she a wife or a worker- or both?


Sources

Bix, Amy Sue. “Equipped for Life: Gendered Technical Training and Consumerism in Home Economics, 1920-1980.” Technology and Culture 43, no. 4 (2002): 728-754.

Leonard Turner, Katherine. “A Woman’s Work Is Never Done: Cooking, Class and Women’s Work.” In How the Other Half Ate: A History of Working Class Meals at the Turn of the Century, 121-140. Oakland: University of California Press, 2014.

“Oshawa Girls Will Take Course in Home-Making Arts,” Oshawa Daily Times (Oshawa, ON), May 7, 1930.

“Some of the Special Vocational Department Classrooms,” Oshawa Daily Times (Oshawa, ON), May 7, 1930.

“What Technical Education Means to The Youth of Oshawa,” Oshawa Daily Times (Oshawa, ON), May 7, 1930.

What Happened the Night of November 12, 1833?

By Laura Suchan, Executive Director

In Thomas Conant’s book, Upper Canada Sketches, published in 1898, he traces the Conant family’s journey from Devon England, to Massachusetts and eventually to a new life in Canada. The book contains a number of illustrations by artist E.S. Shrapnel, known for his landscape paintings and genre scenes.  This article is about the illustration appearing on page 144 entitled “World to Come to An End: Stars are Falling.” All quotations are from Upper Canada Sketches, unless otherwise noted.

In Upper Canada Sketches, Thomas Conant, recounts a mysterious incident that his father, Daniel Conant, witnessed as a young man.   On the evening of November 12, 1833 while salmon-spearing from a boat at Port Oshawa,  Daniel witnessed an astonishing sight as “globes of fire as big as goose eggs began falling all around his boat.” Unbeknownst to him, he had just witnessed a very intense Leonid Meteor Shower, which occur approximately every 33 years. This particular meteor shower was one of the most prolific of all time, with an estimated 240,000 meteors falling in nine hours.1 The storm was seen everywhere in North America east of the Rocky Mountains. So astonishing was the sight that newspapers in Europe even talked about it.  This particular storm eventually led to a theory on the origins of meteors.

Becoming increasingly frightened as the fire-balls continued to fall from the sky, Daniel decided it was a good time to take his salmon and go home.   As he reached his home (Lot 6, B.F., East Whitby), he found the whole household awake and watching the spectacle, apparently too “aroused and frightened” to be able to sleep.  In time, the meteors appeared to be slowing in intensity, so everyone “went to bed to pass a restless night after the awe-inspiring scene they had witnessed.”

 Rising well before the sun next morning, Daniel was surprised to see the sky was still filled with the shooting stars.  Quickly, “he called his hired help in the lumbering business, to come down the stairs. They needed not a second invitation.”  One man by the name of Shields was so overwhelmed he dropped to his knees and began to pray (you can see him in the illustration).  Daniel went out doors and was surprised to note the balls of fire did not burn or hurt.  Thomas Conant makes note that everyone in the household was frightened,  “Of the grandeur of the unparalleled scene my father said almost nothing, for I am led to think they were all too thoroughly frightened to think of beauty, that being a side issue.” 

Daniel decided to visit a neighbor, “a preacher of some renown in the locality.”2 Arriving at his house, Daniel found “the preacher, already awake, was seated at the table beside a tallow dip reading his Bible, with two other neighbors listening and too frightened, he said, to even bid him good morning. He sat and listened to verse after verse and still the stars fell. The preacher gave no explanation or sign.” Noticing day was about to break, Daniel left the preacher’s home and once more ventured outside. On his walk back home, Daniel searched the ground but could find no evidence that the fire balls caused any damage and “what became of the stars that fell he could not conjecture.”  A sailor, Horace Hutchinson, wrote a verse (or doggerel as Thomas calls it) about the event,

I well remembered what I see,
In eighteen hundred and thirty-three,
When from the affrighted place I stood
The stars forsook their fixed abode.

The next Leonid Meteor Shower happened in 1866-1867 at which time the Comet Tempel-Tuttle was determined to be the source of the meteors. The next occurrence of a prolific Leonid Meteor Shower is expected in 2033. 

About the Illustration

The illustrations E.S. Shrapnel (1847-1920) rendered for Upper Canada Sketches are reminiscent of his work in portraying the landscapes and stories of Canada’s wilderness.  Thomas said Shrapnel painted the picture from an actual photograph of the house. Notice how he inserted the praying figure of the hired man Shields in the doorway.  Sonya Jones, Curator of Collections at The Robert McLaughlin Gallery, sums up the whimsical nature of Stars are Falling,

This charming folk art piece by Edward Shrapnel clearly captures the awe and fear that would have accompanied a meteor shower at this time. The smoldering meteors on the foreground, the lit up night sky, the body language of the figures, all add a rich narrative to this otherwise simply executed work. Folk art is often effective in telling stories in simple but clear ways.


  1. https://leonid.arc.nasa.gov/history.html
  2. The preacher referred to in the book could possibly have been Thomas Henry. Henry was ordained as a minister in 1832 and in 1833  was living on an adjacent lot (Lot 7, B.F.) in a house located north of present day Henry House.

The Importance of Context When Examining Photographs

By Jennifer Weymark, Archivist

When leading our primary source workshop, I often pose the question to students “Are photographs accurate depictions of the events they are showing?”  Typically, students respond with “yes, of course.”  I prompt them to reconsider that response and ask what tools do we have available that may make that answer incorrect. This leads into a discussion of photo manipulation with tools such as Photoshop and staged or propaganda photographs and how we must use our cognitive thinking skills when examining photographs to use as evidence of events.

I was fortunate to attend the 2021 Archives Association of Ontario virtual conference in May.  The focus of the conference was doing the work to move our archival collections from their colonial roots into a more inclusive future.  The opening keynote address was entitled “Reimagining Our Futures: Photographs of Sports at Indian Residential Schools” and was delivered by Janice Forsyth.  Dr. Forsyth is an Associate Professor at Western University who specializes in exploring sport’s relationship to Indigenous and Canadian culture.

During her talk, Dr. Forsyth shared an image of a hockey team comprised of students from a residential school.  This image, along with hundreds of others, was an integral part of her research. The image was a typical hockey team pose.  Two rows of children, the ones in the front seated, those in the back standing, all wearing their equipment and smiling for the camera. If you just looked at the image without digging any further, it could be used to support those who argue that residential schools weren’t all bad. However, Dr. Forsyth wanted to know more about the image and the students in the photograph and was connected with one of the students.

Upon speaking with a gentleman who had been one of the students in the photograph, Dr. Forsyth was provided with a great deal of context that altered the information the photograph provided. In the photograph, the students are shown wearing new equipment; however, according to the former student, that equipment was brought in to be worn only for the photograph. In reality, the equipment they were provided with was very old and offered very little protection. He sat with Dr. Forsyth and provided context for more images from the school, all of which highlighted how the photographs were not accurate representations of what sports were like at that school but were stylized to provide a palatable representation of residential schools.

When looking at any photograph, it is always beneficial to include as much context as possible as it is context that allows us to better understand the image we are looking at.

The Month That Was – May 1864

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Vindicator

May 4, 1864, Page 2
New Church Bell
The new Bell for St. George’s Church, of this Village, has arrived, and is now being placed in position, ready to speak when called upon. It is from the Foundry of Meneely & Sons, of Troy, NY, one of the best establishments of the kind in America; and it presents the appearance of being in reality, a very fine piece of workmanship. On Sabbath next we will all enjoy an opportunity of judging of its tone and power. It is said to be the largest bell between Cobourg and Toronto, and with favourable weather, will be heard at distances from ten to fifteen miles. Its weight is 816lbs, and its cost, when put up, will be about $350 currency.

Excursion to the Falls
There is some talk of an immense Sons of Temperance Excursion to the Falls being got up for some day next month, by Oshawa Div. of the Sons. The subject is to be taken up by the Division for consideration and final decision, on Monday evening next. The Grand Division of CW assembles at the Falls (Town of Drummondville) on Wednesday the 22nd, and it is probable that that day will be chosen for the excursion, should it take place.

Page 3
Married
At the residence of the bride’s father, Port Oshawa, on the evening of the 14th ultimo. by Elder H Hayward, Mr. Edward Dearborn and Miss Elizabeth A Henry, daughter of Elder Thomas Henry, all of East Whitby.

Anonymous Letters
The party who sent an anonymous letter from Oshawa to a young man in Whitby, is hereby respectfully informed by latter, that no more need be sent, as the subject of that communication is of no importance to him.
Whitby, April 30, 1864

May 4 1864, 3.

May 11, 1864, page 1
Pay Up.
Fair Warning
I hereby give notice to all parties indebted to me, either by note, book account or otherwise, that if their respective amounts are not paid forthwith, I shall take legal steps to recover the same, without further notice. I have waited long enough for the many small amounts due me since retiring from business, and am determined to make a speedy collection of the same at all hazards. I’ll sue every man that does not pay up at once! That’s so!!
DF Burk, Oshawa, Sept., 23rd, 1863

Page 2
A visit to Cedar Dale
On Thursday last we took a walk down to Cedar Dale, a thriving little village just outside the Corporation of Oshawa, on the south side of the grand trunk railway, and but a few rods from the station. Cedar Dale owes its existence to the fact that a splendid location for a millpond and waterpower has, for ages past, for ought we know to the contrary, existed in that vicinity on the property owned by Mr. Thomas Conant, which waterpower two enterprising Yankees named AS Whiting and EC Tuttle purchased in turned to account in driving the machinery of their Scythe, Hoe, and Fork Manufacturing.

The Oshawa Scythe, Hoe, and Fork Manufacturing with established by the two gentlemen above named some five or six years ago, soon after the failure of the Oshawa Manufacturing Company, in the north branch of that companies building. The entire premises owned by that company were soon afterwards sold at option and purchased by Joseph Hall, of Rochester. Messrs. Whiting and Tuttle carried on their business as usual in the old premises, until Mr. Hall’s run of that work became so large as to require the whole shop; when it was mutually agreed that the Oshawa Scythe, Hoe, and Fork establishment should move. Its proprietors, with an eye to the saving of the cost of steam power, examined Mr. Conant’s mill site, and firm in the conviction that it was the spot for them, being close to the railway station, to Oshawa, and to the harbour at Port Oshawa, they soon came to terms period two years ago last January, the axe was the first set at work towards clearing the forest on the site of the now thriving little manufacturing village of Cedar Dale. Not only was the immediate site of the factory an village cleared, but the whole of the flats on both sides of the Creek, which the water was to overflow, were also cleared of trees and rubbish—a thing not often done—and the consequence is that a fine, clear, wholesome sheet of water now fills the basin, instead of its being a dirty pool, build with dead, broken an unsightly trees, an rotten logs, once at once an eyesore and a breeder of disease for the neighborhood. Looking to the possibilities of the future, the dam was constructed in a very strong manner, and a very wide floodway built, so that it is believed that the breaking away of half a dozen mill dams above cannot affect this one.

The factory is built some 10 or 15 yards south of the east end of the dam, the water being conveyed to it by a raceway, along the brow of the hill, on the east side of the flats. All the manufacturing operations are carried on in the one building, which is 266 by 40 feet in extent and one and a half storeys in height. The water wheel, which is placed near the centre of the building, is a small but powerful affair. It is a turbine wheel of about four feet in diameter, but exerts a driving power equal to that of 70 horses…

…So long as Messrs. Whiting and Tuttle make scythes, hoes, and forks in Canada (which we may safely say will be so long as they live at least) they will make them cheaper and better than anybody else can, simply because they know how to do it, and are determined to do it, no matter what it temporarily costs.

May 11, 1864, 3.

May 18, 1864 page 2
Early Records of the Township of Whitby
We give, below, as promised, a list of the names of all the heads of families of the old Township of Whitby in the year 1822, as found recorded on six of the pages of the old record book from which we have been making quotations for the benefit, chiefly, of “our oldest inhabitants.” Following each name, in the record from which we copy, our figures showing the number of males and females in each family, the number over and the number under 16, and the number of servants, or hired men. For the sake of brevity, however, we omit all except the totals. The old Township of Whitby, to which this list relates, is now divided up into four municipalities, viz:—the two townships of Whitby and East Whitby, the town of Whitby, and the village of Oshawa.

Census of the Township of Whitby for the year 1822

Heads of FamiliesTotal of FamilyHeads of FamilyTotal of Family
Matthew Terwilligar6Wm. Maxim4
Samuel Dearborn8Alva Way2
Josiah Cleaveland4Michael Wood[6]
Reuben Warren11[Henry] Crawford3
Charles Annis5John Way3
Samuel Dorman2Lawrence D. Way3
Thomas Henry4James [Han      ]6
William Hall7David Jones5
William Pickel7Cornelius Jones7
Abraham Terwilligar5Israel Gibbs[8]
Charles Terwilligar5John McGregor, senr.3
William Farewell11Matthias Mackey7
Ackeus Farewell10Daniel DeHart, jnr5
George McGill6Samuel Jameyson9
Abraham Coryell10Daniel DeHart3
Benjamin Stone11Jabez Lynde12
George Hinkson8George Paxton4
Thomas Herriman8Hawkins Lynde4
William Karr7Joseph Edmunds5
John Karr9Alexander Armstrong1
John McGregor2John Warren4
Benjamin Rogers5John Demaray8
James Hall7Richard Martin8
Benjamin [Labrae]5William Huntington6
John Elliot3Richard Gardiner10
Joseph [Beuway]3Henry P. Smith6
Peter Lapoint8Thomas Moore7
Lewis Drolette2Edmund Oragan4
Wm. F. Moore5John Furguson1
John Hews3Isaac Beachman2
Richard Amsbary8John Blake5
Rufus Hall11George Moore4
David Demaray10Samuel Moore3
Enoch Davis7Thomas Liddle3
George Dean5Sylvester Lynde1
Josiah Farewell9Wm. Paxton4
Michael Wilcocks3Lawrence Smith5
Joseph Wileigh6Samuel Cochrane6
Joseph Witterfield7Joseph [I Losce][13]
Norris Karr2Stephen Smith7
Godfrey Avickhouser5Nicholas Demaray11
Wm H Wade5John Still[8]
John Starr2Caleb Elsworth11
Aaron Martin, 2nd1Gershum Herrick1
Samuel Demaray2David Young[8]
Widow Anna Martin5Moses Hemmingway9
[Russel Hoag]5Thomas Provost6
John King5Henry McGahan9
James Starr4W. Nancy Smith4
Edward Starr4Parnell Webb3
John Kent4[Ju     ] A Seeley9
Jabez Hall8Hass[  ]rd Watson2
Caleb Crawford9John Quick7
William Marsh8George Townsend5
Richard Demaray10Jacob Dehart5
Joseph Shand2Thomas Dehart[8]
John Williams7Barnabas Malby3
Jonathan Steward7James Young9
Randal Marsh9Thomas McGahan4
Joseph [LaHaire]2Abraham Brown5
Benjamin Varnum8Silas Watson5
Aaron Martin Senr.,13John Allen4
Alex C. Harlow3Ichabod Hodge6
David Stafford2Widow C Young10

Total Inhabitants,742

Accident – We learn that while Mr. Mackie, of Harmony, was on his way to (or from) church in this village, on Sabbath last, one of the horses which he was driving incautiously stepped up on a stick, one end of which flew up and  stuck into the horse’s body, making such a fearful wound that the animal speedily bled to death on the spot. Mt. Mackie appears to be rather unfortunate with his horses, having lost a valuable animal in a similar way only two years since.

May 25, 1864, page 2
Godey’s Lady’s Book – The June number of this best Ladies’ Magazine in the world is to hand.  This issue completes it’s thirty-fourth year, and they have been thirty-four years of regular success in the business of providing a first-class ladies’ monthly. A large amount of space in this number is devoted to patterns for children’s dresses. The Lady’s Book can be had at Allan’s and at Willox’s. Always inquire for Godey’s Book and buy it, and then you will have the best.

Page 3
House in Oshawa For Sale
For sale, on Water Street, Oshawa, that story and a half Frame House next south of the residence of GH Grierson, Esq., together with the Lot of land (half of an acre) on which it is situated. – There is a fine orchard of apple, plum, and pear trees, &c., and a large number of smaller fruit bushes, all in bearing. Will be sold at a great bargain for cash. Apply, if by letter, post paid, to
C. Warren, Oshawa, May 16th, 1864

May 25, 1864, 3.