The Month That Was – August 1872

All articles originally appeared in the Ontario Reformer

August 2, 1872

Sir John A. Macdonald is earnestly striving to keep Ontario down, by narrowing her boundaries; and is determined to take from her large portion of the western extremity of the Province, including much of the mineral region.  Mr. Gibbs is aiding Sir John in the robbing of Ontario, and wants to be re-elected to Parliament to assist in the completion of the spoliation.

Vote for White, and thus aid in checkmating the curtailment of our territory.

August 2, 1872, page 2

The return match between the Cedar Dale and Oshawa Base Ball Clubs was played on Friday last, and won by the latter club by 25 runs. Only five innings were played. The first game was won by Cedar Dale by nine runs in nine innings.  The third and decisive game will shortly be played, when an interesting time is expected.

The statement in the Vindicator that Mr. Farewell had promised the Dominion nomination to Mr. White, is utterly false – as are all trumped up Vindicator stories of a like nature, got up for the sole purpose of injuring the reform party.

Page 3

Lost
On Sunday, 21st inst. either in Whitby Town or between Whitby and Oshawa, a brown silk umbrella.  The finder will be suitably rewarded by leaving it at the Reformer Office, Oshawa.

August 9, 1872

Page 2

The three cases of assault, which were to have been tried to-day, have been postponed till Monday next, at 10 o’clock am.

Grace Marks received her pardon on condition that she would leave this country never to return.  She left Kingston on Tuesday, for the United States

*From the Canadian Encyclopedia, Grace Marks “was convicted in 1843 at the age of 16 for the murders of Thomas Kinnear, her employer and a wealthy Upper Canadian living in Richmond Hill, and Nancy Montgomery, his housekeeper and mistress.” Her fictionalized story was told in the 1996 Margaret Atwood novel, Alias Grace. More info: https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/alias-grace, https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/mysterious-murder-case-inspired-margaret-atwoods-alias-grace-180967045/

August 9, 1872, page 1

August 16, 1872

Page 2

Mr. Daniel Hinkson having purchased the 75 acres known as the “Karr” property situate to the east of the furniture factory, intends laying it out in Village and Park lots, which he will offer for sale at reasonable rates. The situation is good and healthy, and commands a fine view of the village and surrounding country.

August 16, 1872, page 2

Village Council
A meeting of the Village Council was held on Tuesday evening. Present: the deputy reeve, in the chair, and Messrs. Like and Cameron.

The fire brigade made application for $60 to defray expenses to pic-nic on 5th September.  $50 was granted to them.  The Brigade also made application for a new bell.

Several accounts were passed, and ordered to be paid.

August 16, 1872, page 3

August 23, 1872

Page 2

We are glad to see that the bridge on the Base Line, north of Brook’s hotel, is being repaired, but it was not before it needed it

Immediately after the torch-light procession passed on Wednesday evening, a lighted torch was discovered on the roof of Quigley’s hotel.  How it got there we have been unable to find out. But certain it is, had it not been seen at the time the hotel would have been burned.

Theft – A young man who gave his name as William Smith, was apprehended on Tuesday and brought before John Parker, Esq., for having entered the house of Mr. Thos. Henderson, Dunbarton, while the family were at the funeral of Mrs. Synott, and stolen a watch, which was found upon him when captured, and sworn to by the owner as his property.  Smith accounted for the watch by saying that he bought it from a stranger on the road for two dollars, all the money he had. He was committed to gaol to await his trial at the [Assizes].

August 23, 1872, page 3

Page 4

Notice
Notice is hereby given that I will not be responsible for any debts contracted by my son, William James Sulley
William Sulley
Darlington, June 12, 1871.

August 30, 1872

Page 2

The 20th annual exhibition of the South Ontario Agricultural Society will be held in Whitby on the 19th and 20th of September next. Over $2,000 in prizes will be offered.

Geo. Brown and the Globe still lives to do honor to Canada.  It was feared by some that the powerful (?) letter from the pen of Jno. B. Harris (and Webster’s Dictionary) published in the Mail, of Wednesday last, would prove fatal to Mr. Brown and his mighty paper; but, luckily for the Dominion, they have both survived.  Try again, Mr. Harris.

Johnson Graham, late P.D. in this office, met with a severe accident on Saturday last.  He, with a few of his chums, went out shooting with an old rusty gun.  Graham was to take the first shot, but was advised by some of the boys not to fire the gun for fear it should burst. Their advise was unheeded, and greatly to the dismay of Graham, the gun shot from both ends, the breech flying out and striking him on the head, fracturing his skull, and slightly stunning him.  He soon recovered, went to the creek and washed the blood off, and then walked up to Dr. Coburn’s office, where the wound was dressed and a few pieces of bone taken out.  He was then taken home, where he now lies. He is in great hopes of soon being able to go shooting again, but not with a rusty gun.

A house was haunted in Saginaw, Michigan, and a thorough investigation revealed a venerable woodpecker in an inner room.

Newsworthy Affairs

By Lisa Terech, Community Engagement

One of our regular series on the blog is The Month That Was. The OM started the MTW feature at least a decade ago when we used ‘Facebook Notes’ to share these newspaper stories, and when the blog got off the ground in 2013, the series migrated to this forum.

I am very grateful when our high school co-op students have helped compile the posts for various months, because this series can take quite a bit of time between reading, transcribing, finding images, and scheduling the posts. A few students especially enjoyed this task when it meant using the microfilm reader in the archives, dusting off this technology relic, and yet still a mainstay.

Every so often, when tasked with writing the MTW, I get lost in the articles. My interest piques when I see a familiar name or read about a well known historical event. Last month, I couldn’t help but share with my colleagues when I read a marriage announcement:

Married

At the residence of the bride’s father by Rev. T. Henry, on Saturday evening, the 7th inst, Mr. Albert N. Henry and Miss Harriett T. Guy, both of Port Oshawa.

Oshawa Vindicator, June 11, 1862

Sadly, Harriett died in 1866 due to a typhoid epidemic in the community.

And while I thoroughly the catchy songs in the movie musical The Greatest Showman, we know in real life, PT Barnum was not the sympathetic hero he was portrayed as by Hugh Jackman. This was remarked on in 1865:

Barnum’s expressed design of exhibiting Tom Thumb in France, has called forth a good witticism from Ledru Rollin.  “Tom Thumb should exhibit Barnum,” said he, “for the latter is the greater curiosity.”

Oshawa Vindicator, December 6, 1865

Often, I laugh at what the newspaper deems worthy to print, giggling as I type it out for others to read. For example, in 1872, the Ontario Reformer had an article devoted to the calendar make up, as follows:

The year 1872 contains 52 Sundays. September and December each begins on a Sunday; January, April and July on Monday. October is the only month beginning on a Tuesday. February begins and ends on Thursday; consequently we have five Thursdays, which will not occur again until the year 1900.  In the year 1880, February will have five Sundays which will not occur again until the year 1920.  The year 1871 began on Sunday and ended on Sunday.

Ontario Reformer, January 19, 1872

And in our latest entry for the MTW, in the Oshawa-on-the-Lake column, the following was reported:

The lake water [can] get very cold, nevertheless, a number of campers take a regular morning dip. The first lady bather of the season is Mrs. Sparks of Toronto, who is visiting with the Misses King. She ventured out alone on Wednesday afternoon.

Ontario Reformer, July 11, 1902

There are, unfortunately, gaps in Oshawa’s newspaper history, and we are very fortunate when hard copies exist and are donated to the archives. Because of this, we have sometimes looked to surrounding community’s newspapers for news items about Oshawa.

Pupils of Mae Marsh Delight Big Audience at Masonic Temple

Parents and friends strained the capacity of the Masonic Temple, Oshawa, on Saturday afternoon, to see the dance recital presented by the Lillian Mae Marsh School of Dancing.  Picturesque costumes that would have qualified for a Broadway show and a smartly paced program held the interest of the audience.

Canadian Statesman, April 4, 1952

Perhaps the MTW that looked the farthest afield was April 1937. This was the month of the strike that saw the recognition of the auto workers union, and the strike itself made headlines in Canada and the US. As reported in Indiana,

Premier Hurls New Threat in Oshawa Strike
Oshawa, Ont., April 13 (AP) – A move by Canada’s minister of labor to mediate the Oshawa strike pivoted today upon consent by General Motors of Canada, Ltd.

Meanwhile, other developments added fuel to the already heated controversy of international scope: Hugh Thompson, John L. Lewis’s right-hand man in the Oshawa strike, asserted the US supreme court decision on the Wagner act would cast the United Automobile Workers’ union in the role of sole bargaining agent for the General Motors workers here and the in the United States.

Premier Mitchell Hepburn of Ontario accused Lewis of trying to become “economic and political dictator” of both the United States and Canada and declared that, if he came to Canada and sponsored any overt act, or if any of his aids should do so, they would be jailed “for a good, long time and there wouldn’t be any bail.”

Lafayette Journal and Courier (Lafayette, Indiana), 13 April 1937

When I randomly chose the Month That Was December 1872, I was highly interested to learn that it was during this month that a great fire affected downtown Oshawa, the paper remarking Oshawa had been ‘Chicagoed’ likening this disaster to the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. I’d recommend reading this month in its entirety, HERE.

Be sure to watch our blog on the first of every month for the latest edition of The Month That Was, and I hope you enjoy reading these posts as much as I enjoy researching and writing them!

The Month That Was – July 1902

All articles originally appeared in the Ontario Reformer

July 4, 1902

Page 1
Lost. On or about the 21st of June, between Conlin’s School House and Oshawa, a finger glove used in ball playing, was lost. The finder will be liberally rewarded by leaving it at this office. July 3, 1902.

Page 4
Mr. John Goyne, formerly of Oshawa, is a member of No. 3 Field Hospital and Bearer Company, of Montreal, which won first prize in the first aid work and drill competition at St. Helen’s Island last week. The squad, which is comprised of six men, won 279 marks of a possible 300. John will be in Oshawa next week to spend his summer vacation.

Oshawa Old Boys Reunion – Many towns throughout the province have of late been holding re-union celebrations and on all occasions the event has proved successful in every respect. We think it now up to Oshawa to make a move for such a festival and suggest that action be at once taken in the matter.  There is plenty of time for a citizens committee to take hold of this scheme and make a successful demonstration here on the Annual Labour Day holiday.  We feel confident that whoever offers to take the matter in hand will receive the support of the entire community.  If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.

Deaths
Farewell – In Saulte Ste. Marie, on Wednesday, the 2nd inst., Dr. George M Farewell in his 65th year.  The Funeral will leave the family homestead at Harmony, on Saturday afternoon, 5th inst., at 2:30 o’clock.

Page 8
Kawartha Lakes
Before deciding on a place at which to spend the vacation this summer, it is will to take into consideration the many advantages of the Kawartha Lakes region of Ontario, Canada.  As a place for camping the region has to superior.  For the most part, the shores of the lakes are untouched by man. Nature is seen in all her grand disorder, there being nowhere that artificiality which, to the true lover of nature, often spoils landscape.  Pure air and water, each which is a factor in choosing a summering place, are assured in that region.  Transportation on the lakes is also amply provided by a steamboat line plying between Lakefield and Coboconk, a distance of 70 miles.  There is an additional attraction for the angler, as the fishing in the lakes is very good.  The gamey maskirouge (sic) and black bass are there to reward the sportsman.

July 11, 1902, page 6

July 11, 1902

Page 2
Coronation in August

Report Says that It Will Be Earlier Than Expected
A despatch from London says King Edward will be crowned between August 11 and August 15.  His recovery has been so rapid and satisfactory that the above decision was arrived at today.  No [official] announcement of the fact has yet been made, however.  The pageant through the streets and the ceremony at Westminster Abbey will be much curtailed from the original plan.  Their Majesties will drive from Buckingham Palace to the Abbey through the Mall to Whitehall and thence to the Abbey, the same route as taken at the opening of Parliament.

Page 3
Oshawa-on-the-Lake
The warm weather of the past week has at last brought down daily a large crowd of visitors who spend a few hours with us and return home much refreshed

The cottages are now all occupied, as also are the rooms over Henry’s restaurant and the campers are thoroughly enjoying all the pleasures that life at the resort affords.

The lake water [can] get very cold, nevertheless, a number of campers take a regular morning dip. The first lady bather of the season is Mrs. Sparks of Toronto, who is visiting with the Misses King. She ventured out alone on Wednesday afternoon.

Mr CA Mallory for the past few years has become prominent resident as the resort [is not] with us this year, and his familiar form is greatly missed.  He has rented his restaurant to Mr. Ed Thomas and with his wife will sail to England to spend a month or so there.

July 11, 1902, page 7

July 18, 1902

Page 1
Oshawa-on-the-Lake
A number of picnics have been booked for this month and next at AD Henry’s grounds.  To-morrow Mount Carswell Sons of Temperance will be here, and Saturday, the 25th inst. the annual picnic of the employees of the Malleable Iron Works will be help. This picnic has been setteled for the 19th but owing to the large crowd coming from out of town on that day to attend the big lacrosse match up town, the Oshawa Railway found it would be impossible to handle the crowd.

On Wednesday the Argyle brought some seven hundred from Toronto to picnic at the Park., Some of our young ladies seem to look forward with great delight to the days the boat brings picnics and remains all day.  It is nice they can find some attraction on the boat since our resort affords them none.

Page 3
To visit Khartoum
The Prince, the Khedive and Lord Kitchener
A despatch from London says – it is stated that the Prince of Wales and General Kitchener will be present with the Khedive of Egypt at the formal inauguration of the great Assouan dam in December.  The party will afterwards visit Khartoum.

July 25, 1902, page 5

July 25,1902

Page 1
Reward
The undersigned will pay the ten dollars to any person who will give information that will convict the party or parties that broke in the door of the weigh scales at the Harbor, or [     ] the name F. Finnigan on the new store house at the Harbor
Henry Salter, [       ] of Words

July 25, 1902, page 6

Page 4
Proclamation
Civic Holiday
In accordance with a resolution of the Town Council in that behalf, I hereby proclaim

Monday, the 4th day of Aug – prox. A Public Holiday for this Corporation.  Accordingly all citizens are respectfully requested to refrain from their ordinary avocations on that Day.

FL Fowke, Mayor
Mayor’s Office, July 23, 1902

The Month That Was – June 1862

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Vindicator

June 4, 1862
The Municipal Election
The Election held in Oshawa on Friday and Saturday last, for the purpose of filling the vacancy in the Village Council, resulted in the return of Mr. JW Fowke by a majority of 10 over Mr John Hyland.  The votes, at the close of the poll, stood: for Fowke 99; for Hyland 89.  Most of the voting was done in the afternoon of the second day.  About 2 o’clock, Mr. Hyland was upwards of 20 votes ahead, and his friends were beginning to feel confident of success, which led Mr. Fowke’s friends to stir about, and for two hours the voting went off quite brisk, resulting as already stated.

June 4, 1862, page 1

Bill to repeal the Fugitive Slave Law
A bill was introduced in the Senate, to-day, by Mr. Sumner, repealing the fugitive slave law and prohibiting slavery in the territories existing or to be acquired, and abolishing it in all the dock-yards, forts, arsenals, etc., located in the slave states, thus relieving the national government from any connection with slavery.

June 4, 1862, page 3

June 11, 1862
Eclipse of the Moon
A total eclipse of the Moon takes place to-night, (Wednesday) or rather to-morrow morning. It will commence a few minutes before twelve o’clock, p.m.*, and end at fifteen minutes past three to-morrow morning – its duration being three hours and seventeen minutes.  The moon will be wholly immersed in the shadow of the earth – totally eclipsed – for the space of sixty-two minutes
*midnight

June 11, 1862, page 3

A Heavy Lamb – Mr. Alex Knox, of Clyde Bank, East Whitby, brought to Oshawa on Tuesday of last week,  a lamb weighing 67 lbs, live weight, at the age of fourteen weeks.  A pretty good specimen for the age, and hard to beat.

Married
At the residence of the bride’s father by Rev. T. Henry, on Saturday evening, the 7th inst, Mr. Albert N. Henry and Miss Harriett T. Guy, both of Port Oshawa.

June 18, 1862
C. Warren & Co.’s Tannery
A few days since we took a walk thro’ the above-mentioned establishment, picking up by the way, a few items of information which may possibly be interesting to some of our readers.

This tannery is not what might be termed a one-horse concern, in which no other power than that of one or two workmen, and one horse is needed to carry on its operations, but gives active employment to about a dozen workmen, whose labors are lighted by a six-horse power engine and a powerful water wheel, which do all the pumping, bark grinding, etc.  At present, from fifty to seventy hides per week are “taken in and done for,” but a large addition upon the west and north sides of the old building, is in course of erection, which, when completed, will give a capacity for working up one hundred hides per week.  Such a number of hides, as a matter of course, could not be purchased in this neighborhood, and therefore Messrs. Warren & Co. Have to draw upon distant points for stock.  Most of their hides are purchased in Chicago, and the leather, into which they are manufactured, is chiefly sold in Kingston and Montreal.  The new building, now enclosed, will contain nearly as many vats as the main one, and will be ready for operation in about a week.

June 18, 1862, page 4

Early closing.
We are much pleased to observe that the Merchants of Oshawa have signed and published an agreement to close their shops precisely at half past seven o’clock every evening, from now to The first of October. This is a very proper move, and we hope it will be rigidly adhered to by all, whatever may be the temptation to violate it. The farmers come in and transact their business in the daytime, as do also, many who live in the village, and those of the latter class who cannot make it convenient to visit the stores in the daytime, can surely get there, and find parties to wait upon them, before half past seven. In some of our stores, for some time past, there has been no regular time for closing, nor for clerks to get an hour to themselves.

We have expressed a hope that the agreement to close at half past seven would be rigidly observed by those who are parties to it. We say this because it is well known that, when a similar agreement was made on a former occasion, some parties lived up to the letter, but grossly violated the spirit of it by keeping their doors unbarred, if not unlocked, and their stores were well lit up, for hours after other merchants had really and truly closed up. Such a practice is in the highest degree unjust to those who close punctually and completely, because it robs them of many casual quarters or dollars which they might get by pursuing a similar course.

June 25, 1862
Temperance Soiree
The members of the Raglan Division announce their intention to hold a Soiree in Mr. Smith’s grove, a mile and a half east of Raglan, on Wednesday next, the 2nd of July. Several able and interesting speakers are engaged for the occasion, as also vocal and instrumental musicians, and everything promises a pleasant and profitable season.

East Whitby Division is also to have a Soiree in the grove a little north of Harmony, on the following day – Thursday the 3rd of July. A number of good speakers are also engaged for this occasion, and the music is to be supplied by the Oshawa Brass Band. The committee intend to use their best exertions to render the affair in every respect worth of large attendance.  Tea to be served at Harmony at half-past two o’clock and at Raglan at one o’clock.

June 25, 1862, page 3

The Month That Was – May 1873

All articles appeared in the Ontario Reformer

May 7 1873
Death & Inquest
The young man Farrel whom we reported in our last issue as having been injured on Saturday night, the 26th ult., died on Tuesday the 20th.  Owing to the peculiar circumstances under which deceased received his injuries it was thought advisable that an inquiry should be instituted.  Dr. Clarke was accordingly notified, and summoned a jury for 2 o’clock, on Wednesday last.  A number of witnesses were examined as to the manner in which the injuries were inflicted.  The testimony was given, went to show that the deceased was intoxicated, and had got upon a wagon going through the village in the direction of Harmony, between nine and ten that evening, and shortly after engaged with two others upon the wagon in a “scuffle,” which resulted in deceased tumbling overboard, the wagon passing over his head, face, and neck.

Drs. McGill and Coburn, who had seen him after the accident, made a post mortem examination of the parts, and testified as to the nature of the injuries… The opinion was that the death resulted from the effects of the injuries to the throat.  The jury, with Mr. Jno. Larke as foreman, returned as their verdict, “Accidental Death.”

May 7 1873 p1.JPG
May 7, 1873, page 1

May 7, 1873
Mr Carswell is advertised to give a lecture in the Music Hall, on Friday evening next.  The lecturer has just returned after a lengthened tour through the United States, and the public press wherever he has spoken speak of him in the highest terms.

May 7 1873 p3.JPG
May 7, 1873, page 3; for more on the fire, please see The Month That Was – December 1872

May 7, 1873
Our enterprising neighbour, Mr. AS Whiting, has caused within the last few days, a number of beautiful trees to be planted on each side of Simcoe Street, from the railway to the edge of the pond, and along the street leading to the harbour… Anything Mr. Whiting undertakes to do is always well done; this fact is plainly evidenced in his tree planting.  It has been observed that those put out under his instructions and supervision flourished and grown rapidly when others die.  Cedar Dale but a few years ago was not in existence, through the establishment and enterprising of the Cedar Dale Works, in now takes the position of a handsome and flourishing neighbour.

 

May 14 1873
Married
On the 7th inst. At Christ’s Church, Owosso, Michigan, by the Rev. Mr. Whitney, Robert Woon, esq., of Oshawa, to Miss Alice Ingersoul, Owosso, Michigan.

 

May 21, 1873
Queen’s Birthday
The Grand Musical Jubilee
We call the attention to the spirited entertainment got up by the Victoria Lodge of Orange Young Britons for the birthday of our beloved queen.  May we have the pleasure of commemorating many such days for her! The programme is an extra good one, and the selections of songs such as insures a crammed hall.  The array of outside talent procured – professionals all – reflects the highest credit upon the Young Britons, and we feel certain with such a spacious room as our New Music Hall, a rare treat is in store for the people of Oshawa on next Saturday night. Get your reserved seat tickets in time or you may have to take your place near the draft of the door

May 21 1873 p3.JPG
May 21, 1873, page 3

May 21, 1873
Oshawa Enterprise – Our indefatigable fellow-townsman, JW Fowke, has just shipped from Whitby Harbour a cargo by the Schooner Kate 4,500 bushels Wheat and 1,500 bushels Peas for Montreal.  He is collecting another cargo of wheat and one of wool for which he pays cash.  Go ahead Fowke and scatter the cash among the farmers.

May 21, 1873
Barnum’s Great Show – We have received the “Advance Courier” of Mr. PT Barnum, from which we learn, that he is again in possession of the largest, most elaborate and exhaustive combination of travelling exhibition ever exhibited on earth, embracing 20 shows consolidated in one.  This great Show will visit Canada in July, and no doubt will favor us with a visit.

May 21, 1873
All parties wishing to celebrate her Majesty’s Birthday, will do well to at Hodder’s and buy a new hat.

 

May 28, 1873
The Village constable, as will be seen by referring to our advertising columns, has been instructed to impound all cattle running at large upon our public streets after Monday next.

May 28 1873 p3.JPG
May 28, 1873, page 3

May 28, 1873
The band of the St. Patrick’s Benevolent Society wish to tender to the inhabitants of Oshawa, their more grateful acknowledgement for the very kind manner in which they were received on the morning of the Queen’s birthday.  Their liberal response was beyond their expectation, therefore they wish to inform the public that they will always find them ready and willing to oblige them on any occasion where their services would benefit, and especially on any benevolent or charitable purples, and also with it to be distinctly understood that they are not in opposition to any other party, their motto is and always will be “Harmony.”

May 28, 1873
Fire crackers have at different times of late been the cause of a great deal of mischief and loss of property.  In Whitby on the 24th, a house was  set on fire by their use but happily extinguished before much damage was done.  In some places the sidewalks in Oshawa were fired in the same way.  The authorities would be justified in forbidding their use when danger is likely to result