The Month That Was – December 1872

All  articles are from the Ontario Reformer

December 6, 1872
A short time ago a horse was advertised in the Reformer as strayed.  It  had been missing for some weeks, and no clue to its whereabouts could be obtained till the day after the “ad” appeared, when the owner saw it and got his horse.  One day this week a man came in to advertise a steer which had strayed on to his premises.  Before the advertisement appeared in print the owner had his animal.  If you want anything made known bring your advertisement to the Reformer office.  We presume the reason why the last anumal was recovered so soon was, the “ad” was paid for in advance.

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December 6, 1872, page 1

December 6, 1872
Births

In Oshawa, on the 3rd inst., the wife of Thomas Hopper, of a son.

In Oshawa, on the 4th inst, the wife of Mr. Parks, Bruce Street, of a son.

In Harmony, on the 3rd inst., the wife of Mr. Calston Horn, of a son.

In Oshawa on the 30th ult., the wife of Mr. Wm. Right, of a son.

Married

On the 27th ult., by the Rev. Wm. Scott Mr Thomas Hoskin Jr., of Oshawa, to Miss Eliza Jane, eldest daughter of the late Mr. John Colman, of Darlington

 

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December 6, 1872, page 2

 

December 13, 1872
Terrible Conflegration (sic)
Oshawa ‘Chicagoed’
Fourteen places of business and seven dwellings destroyed
The fire supposed to be the work of an ifcendiary (sic)

The most fearful fire that ever took place in Oshawa was that of Sunday night last.  About ten minutes after seven, a fire was discovered in the clothing store of Mr. Geo. Hodder, and the alarm was immediately given.  The Fire Brigade was soon at the scenes of the conflagration, and at work; but, as usual, the water supply gave out, and the efforts of the firemen to confine the fire to the place where it originated proved unsuccessful.  Quickly the flames spread, and soon the adjoining stores were enveloped with the devouring elements.  It now became evident that the entire row of buildings, from Fitzmaurice’s drug store, around the corner, to Garth’s butcher shop, was doomed, unless a good supply of water could be obtained.  There were three engines at work, Oshawa No. 1 and 2 and the little chemical engine from the Hall Works, all doing well when they could obtain water.  When it became evident that the fire was likely to spread as it did, endangering the whole town, Mr. C.W. Smith procured a horse and went for the Whitby steam fire engine, having first made arrangements for a team to meet the engine on its way down.  Inside of an hour and ten minutes after Mr. Smith left for Whitby, the steamer was playing on the fire, procuring water from the well at Black’s corner.  And well did this little “Merryweather’ under the management of the noble Whitby Fire Brigade, do its work – nobly did the brigade work; and to-day the businessmen on the north side of King Street may thank the Whitby Fire Brigade for saving – with their engine – their property.  Just before the Whitby engine arrived, it was fully expected that the Gibbs block would go, as the heat from the burning buildings was intense.  In fact, in front of the Chisholm’s store, Blamey & Briggs’ store, and the top of Hind’s hotel, were on fire, but with the help of the ‘little chemical,’ the fire in the two  stores was put out, and Hind’s was saved by the Whitby engine.  All this time, the Oshawa Brigade, with old No. 1 and No. 2, was working as they always work – nobly.  But what is the use of a fire engine without water! The Oshawa Hook and Ladder Company worked like ‘all out doors’ as they always do. The citizens, with a few exceptions, worked as if the property belonged to the doing all they could to save goods from the doomed stores.  Men and boys ‘played horse’ and with wagons drew away the goods as fast as they could be loaded, to places of safety.

… The fire was, indeed bad; but how much worse might it have been.  A few accidents happened to the firemen and others, but none of a serious nature.  Let us be thankful that there were no lives lost.

…The persons who burst open Mr. Hoddor’s door distinctly state that the fire first started in the north-west corner of the shop, which would be as much as twelve or fourteen feet from the stove. What makes it certain that the fire could not have originated from any defect in the stove is, there was no fire in it from Saturday night; and the stove was cold when Mr. Hoddor left after closing.

There was no one in the shop, or, no one who had any business there, on Sunday but Mr. Hoddor’s boy, and that was about eight o’clock in the morning.

There appears to be no doubts whatever  but that the fire was the work of an incendiary; but who the scoundrel is yet remains a mystery. A jury was empaneled on Tuesday last, and an investigation proceeded with, before Dr. Clark, coroner, and is yet going on, privately. A great many persons have been examined, but no evidence has been adduced which will criminate anyone.  If any important is brought before the jury, we will make it known in our next issue.

Where to find them

The old customers (and as many new ones wish) of those of our merchants and business men who were compelled to move on Sunday night, on account of the ‘extreme heat’ will find them at the following places, for the present, where great bargains may be expected.

Trewin will be found in the store lately occupied by EB Wilcox, one door west of Wigg & Son’s furniture warerooms.

Dr. Deans will be found in the shop next door north of Taylor’s jewellery store.

Wm. Dickie will be found in the shop between Trewin’s and Gillett Bros.

JF Willox will be found up stairs, over W Lang’s store, one door west of Steele Bros.

JP Johnston will be found in part of H Wilkinson’s boot and shoe store, three doors east of Black’s hotel, till further notice.

R Fitchett will be found, on or after Monday next, in part of Keddie & Rice’s new store.

JJ Hall will be found at present at Hindes’ Hotel, where he will shave you as clean as he ever did.

Geo. Garth will be found in the place lately occupied by Mrs. Finney, next door to Shaw’s boot and shoe store.

J Barnard will be found two doors east of Black’s hotel.

JO & RH Henry will be found in the old stand, Simcoe St., next door to the Reformer Office.

The other parties have not, as yet, secured places.

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The Month That Was – November 1947

 

Nov, 1, 1947

POLICE NAB 3 IN $137,000 PAYROLL RAID
Boston, Nov. 1 (AP) – An escaped convict who jumped out of a fourth floor window in a drawn gun police chase was captured today and held for questioning with two other former prisoners in Boston’s day-apart payroll raids in which hooded gunmen snatched a total of $137,000.

George Hayes, 30, who broke out of State’s Prison Sept. 19, was taken after injuring himself gravely in a leap from a suburban Cambridge apartment house, police reported.

Another former convict was arrested in the same apartment building a short time later, making three ex-prisoners now held in connection with a Tuesday robbery of $29,000 from two firms.

Patrick Farina, third man arrested since the hold-ups, was charged with armed robbery in the $108,000 raid at the Sturtevant Division of the Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

 

Smashed Fence Most Serious Hallowe’en Prank
Chief of police Owen D. Friend said today that he “has seen a good many worse Hallowe’ens” and added that some of the acts reported were nothing more than childish pranks while others were criminal offenses against the public.

Possibly the near-full moon spreading its cool light over the countryside was a reason for Oshawa’s comparatively quiet 1947 Hallowe’en Police were a little busy but firemen had no calls and Fire Chief Westley R. Elliott remarked today, “I cannot remember when we last when through a Hallowe’en without a false alarm.”

Probably the most expensive breakage was done to a concrete and wooden fence recently constructed by Harry Cowley, 293 Gilddon Avenue. It was pure vandalism that resulted in damage estimated by the owner and police at nearly $100. Mr. Cowley said he had just completed the fence about ten days ago.

B. W. Haynes, 39 Park Road North, reported that a summer house in the backyard had been overturned. Although lifted clear of its foundation last night, it did not suffer extensive damage.

City fireman L. R. Little, 82 Oshawa Boulevard, said some destructive scalliwags tore part of the eave trough right off his house. “Just say,” jokingly quipped Mr. Little within hearing of the other firemen, “that I may suspect of my fellow workmen.”

Detenbeck’s Men’s Shop, King Street East, and Fred Guscott’s plumbing stockroom, 21 Church Street, received somewhat identical treatment when their windows were marked; the former with soap and Mr. Guscott’s with grey paint.

Rotten tomatoes and cucumbers were freely thrown about the property of Charles Carpenter, 215 Park Road South, and street lights along the unpopulated section of McMillan Drive were broken.

Motorists driving through the intersection of Mary and Hillcroft Streets last night were obliged to break down a tinny barrier of empty cans which caused a lot of noise and a few loud exclamations but no damage.

Chief A. J. Pierce of the East Whitby Township Police force reported the only damage he had investigated was the breakage of several large cement tile, the property of the Township.

 

DEER AT GOLF CLUB
Seventeen – year – old Jack Penfound, 39 McLaughlin Boulovard, strolling over the Oshawa Gold Club property yesterday afternoon, was surprised to see a buck deer springing across the links toward the west. He said it disappeared down around the creek bed. “It had beautiful antlers.” The boy stated.

 

Nov, 8, 1947

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The Month That Was – October 1862

All stories were reported in the Oshawa Vindicator.

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October 1, 1862, Page 2

The War
Washington, Sept 26 – The governors of the following states arrived here this morning from Altoona, OA, viz: Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Michigan, New Hampshire, Indiana.

The last named (Indiana) was represented by Col. Rose.

Between 12 and one o’clock the governors of the states above named had an interview of an official character with President Lincoln…

The governors were courteously and kindly received, and their suggestions listened to with close attention by the President.

It is ascertained from those who had the best opportunities for knowing that there was no proposition made at the recent conference at Altoona, nor even a suggestion ventured, touching the removal of General McClellan, or was any proposition of suggestion made as to the promotion of General Fremont to the head of the army, or as to the future disposal of that gentleman.

 

Cincinnati, Sept 29 – Gen. Jefferson C. Davis shot Gen. Nelson at the Galt House, Louisville, this morning, killing him almost instantly

All business was totally suspended in this city yesterday, from 2 till 5pm, all the citizens being under drill. The turn-out was large.

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Hall’s Factory Burned!
It becomes our painful duty to announce the total demolition of the well-known Woollen Factory owned by Mr. Samuel Hall, located just north of Oshawa, and occupied by Mr. Geo. Brook.  It took fire it is not known how, near midnight on Monday evening, and in short time the building, and all the valuable stock and machinery, were reduced to a heap of ashes and smoking ruins.  Two men or horse-back were sent to Oshawa to give the alarm, and the fire engine and a lot of the men went out and did good service in assisting to save the property in the neighbourhood of the factory from the devouring element.

We learn that Mr. Hall had an insurance for $7,000 on the building, and the stick and machinery was insured in about $4,000.

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October 15, 1862, Page 1

To Abolish Fruit Stealing
As we grow older (and more charitable?) we are the more included to imagine that the stealing of fruit springs from an ignorant, heedless sportiveness, rather than from deliberate wickedness.  They who steal have never learned how much time and labor it costs to raise fruit; and seeing it in tempting plentifulness around, they think it can harm nobody very much if they take a little.  We do not justify this, nor do we depreciate the use of legal suasion at times; but would not a little moral influence and tact also be well? –American Agriculturalist

 

October 15, 1862, Page 2

Reception of Lord Monck at Whitby
Whitby, Oct 6th, 1862
The passage of His Excellency the Governor General through Whitby was seized upon by the laymen of the town and county as a suitable opportunist for the display of their attachment to the Mother Country, and their gratification at the assumption of the government of the Province by the present popular representative of Royalty. It became known that Lord Monck should be at the Whitby Station about one o’clock pm, and for some time before that hour men, women, and children began to wend their way thither.  A platform had been erected for His Excellency’s reception, with a canopy which was decorated with evergreens; a large motto proclaimed “welcome” to His Excellency, and several flags added to the gaiety of the scene. The Stouffville Brass Band discoursed sweet music before and during His Excellency’s stay. About a thousand persons were present, many of htem leading men from different parts of the County.

 

October 22, 1862, Page 2

Sudden Death
On Wednesday last, Mr. Daniel Robinson, living on lot No. 2 in the 9th Concession of East Whitby, came to Oshawa with a load of wheat. When within 2 ½ miles of his home, in returning, he was taken with terrible pains in his breast and stomach, and turned into the house of his brother-in-law, Mr. John McCullough.  As his condition did not improve, his wife was sent for, and on the following evening, sad to relate, his sufferings were relieved by death. He was a steady and industrious man of about 40 years of age, and leaves a wife and family to mourn over their sudden bereavement of their chief dependence and mainstay in life.

The Month That Was – September 1929

The Month That Was – September 1929
The Oshawa Daily Times
Governor-General to Visit Oshawa on September 16
Edition 04 September 1929

Viscount Willingdon, Governor-General of Canada, will pay an official visit to Oshawa on Monday, September 16, the city council was informed at its meeting last night. A special committee has been named to make arrangement for the civic reception to the Governor-General.

On his official visit, Viscount Willingdon will be accompanied by Vis-countess Willingdon and by several members of his staff, the official communication received by the council stated. The party will arrive at the Canadian National depot by special train at 10 o’clock Daylight Saving time, Monday morning, and from 10 o’clock to noon will be entertained by the city. At noon Viscount Willingdon will be the guest of R. S. McLaughlin at luncheon at Parkwood, and in the afternoon will make a tour of the local plants of General Motors.

 

The Oshawa Daily Times
Helped Him
Edition 04 September 1929

“You know, Dad, he always said he’d never marry until the right girl came along.”
“Well, how does he know you are the right one?”
“Oh, I told him I was.”

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The Oshawa Daily Times
GOODYEAR ‘BLIMP’ VISITED OSHAWA THIS AFTERNOON
Edition 04 September 1929

Took Series of Motion Pictures and Photos from the Air

Oshawa was visited this afternoon by the dirigible of the Goodyear Tire Company, the now well-known “blimp” coming on here from the Canadian National Exhibition, where it was taking part in today’s air circus. On board the dirigible was a party of photographers and camera men, who took a series of still and motion pictures of the General Motors plant as seen from the air. After circling over the city for a short time, the big airship turned round and returned to Toronto, where it is making its headquarters for the next few days. The pictures taken from the air today are to be used in Chevrolet sales promotion work throughout Canada in the near future.

 

The Oshawa Daily Times
DRUG TRAFFICKERS HAVE MANY TRICKS
Edition 04 September 1929

CARRIER PIGEONS USED TO TRANSPORT SUPPLIES OF DOPE

New Methods- Many Private Houses Are in the Guise of Clubs

Montreal – Behind closed doors and heavily curtained windows bogus West End night clubs are again selling liquor after hours and catering for drug addicts.

Following certain rumors of their renewed activities, I determined to find what really was happening in the West End, which after midnight is supposed to be drinkless. But the new proprietors are cautious – newcomers are not welcomed as in the old days.

 

The Oshawa Daily Times
New G. M. C. Building for Oshawa
Edition 07 September 1929

ERECTION OF NEW PARTS AND SERVICE BUILDING TO START IN TWO WEEKS

Wrecking of Three Houses on Site of New Building, Bond and Mary Streets, Has Already Started – Tenders Close Next Friday on the Building

H. A. Brown, General Manager of G. M. C. of Canada, Announces That Unit Will Probably Be Completed About January 1

A new parts and service building will be erected immediately by General Motors of Canada, Limited, it was announced this morning by H. A. Brown, vice-president and general manager of the company. The building will be erected on the north-east corner of Bond and Mary streets, immediately west of the present parts and service building.

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Pictured from left to right: John H. Beaton, general sales manager of General Motors of Canada; Geo. E. Amsely, sales manager of McLaughlin-Buick Motor Car Co.; H. A. Brown, vice-president and general manager of General Motors of Canada; Charles H. Ricketta, manager of the McLaughlin-Buick factory branch in Toronto; and R. S. McLaughlin, president of General Motors of Canada.

The Oshawa Daily Times
Highest Award for Local Poultryman
Edition 07 September 1929

John Thomas Wins Grand Championship Prize at C. N. E.

Whitby, Sept. 7. – The grand championship for the finest bird on display at the poultry show of the Canadian National Exhibition has been awarded to a barred rock cockerel owned by Constable John Thomas of the Whitby police force. This year constable Thomas displayed ten chickens at the poultry show and besides the high honor mentioned above his chickens have been awarded three first and two second prizes and the challenge shield for the best display of barred rocks.

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The Oshawa Daily Times
FIREMEN ROUTE ANGRY HORNETS
Edition 07 September 1929

Insects Were Attacking Pedestrians on Centre Street

“How doth the bust bee improve each shining hour?” is a question asked in a familiar ditty which was answered yesterday for local people by a number of hornets, which if not bees, may be at least regarded as near relatives. These particular hornets had built a nest in a tree in fornt of the residence of Dr. C. E. Wilson, Centre street, and they knew how to improve each shinning hour. Individual members of the colony took great delight in bussing down from the nest and attacking pedestrians as they passed along the street. The infirm, the aged and the very young were not spared and it was remarkable the impetus which pedestrian traffic received through the application of a few hornet stings. They did not complain to the police but laid their troubles before the fire department.

The local brigade is called upon to do many unusual things even though there are no Doukabhors in Oshawa who may require a soaking with streams from a fire hose as in Nelson, B. C. But Chief Elliott’s department is equal to any emergency and the fireman immediately prepared to make war upon the hornets. Instead of rushing to the scene with bells ringing and sirens blowing they crept up quietly on the unsuspecting insects. The nest was located and promptly set on fire.

The Month That Was – August 1902

Ontario Reformer
Bullets in Their Brain
Edition 01 August 1902

PEOPLE WHO CARRY THEM AND FEEL NO ILL EFFECTS
Many Strange Things Found in the Brain – Some Curious Cases

The idea that the human brain is an organ so extremely delicate in its structure that it cannot bear the slightest physical hurt sometimes appears to receive a contradiction in the experience of people who have been met with peculiar injuries to the head. The history of brain surgery presents some remarkable facts in regard to the extent to which the thinking organ will sometimes resist the effects of external injury. It has been shown that in some cases quantities of its substance may be removed without appreciably diminishing the normal intelligence of the patient; while some have been known to carry the most extraordinary foreign substance embedded in their skulls for years.

Finds of the most singular kind have been made in the interior substances of the living human brain. The strangest things have been known to find entry there through accident or design. In one case it was the blade of a penknife that was carried about in the brain for half a lifetime without the patient being in the least aware of it: in another it was a penholder that had somehow found its way there and remained in its living hiding-place without apparently interfering with the thinking power of the organ: while only a week or so ago a piece of slate pencil was recovered from a boy’s brain after it had been hidden there for several years.

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Ontario Reformer
The McLaughlin Carriage Co.’s Employes [SIC] Excursion
Edition 22 August 1902

Saturday morning last the sun rose upon a cloudless sky, for the weather clerk had notice that on that day the employees of the McLaughlin Carriage Company were to run their excursion to Orillia. A special train had been chartered for the occasion and the extremely low rate of $1.95 was secured for the excursionists. Long before the hour set for departure the street corners along Simcoe and King streets were crowded with people waiting for cars to carry them to the station. About eight o’clock the train of eleven coaches drawn by two engines, started from Oshawa. The train was tastily decorated for the occasion by the Committes [SIC]. The service rendered by the railway was highly satisfactory, for the run was made in about three hours and a half, which was passed by the excursionists in pleasant conversation and in viewing the varied scenery of river, lake, hill, and harvest.

The Oshawa Citizen’s Band was in attendance to furnish music for the day and the baseball and lacrosse teams went along to play games.

When Orillia was reached part of people got off the train and formed a procession, headed by the band, which proceeded to the park, while the train carried the remainder direct to the Park. Here dinner was partaken of by those who had carried their blankets, the rest going to the hotels. In the afternoon a baseball game was played between the Oshawa team and a team from the employees of the Tudhope Carriage Co., of Orillia. The Oshawa players were to fast for Orillia and succeeded in scoring 22 runs to Orillia’s 6.  There was no programme of games as the lacrosse game on the oval called for 3 o’clock. Those who did not attend the lacrosse game spent the balance of the afternoon taking in the town or quietly resting in the park, which is beautifully situated on the shore of Lake Couchiching … The whole day was pleasantly spent by employer and employee and showed the harmony that exists in this great Oshawa industry. The return journey was commenced about 7 o’clock and by 11 o’clock all were safely at home save for a few who remained over Sunday. The Committee of Management carried out the whole program successfully and it is due to their untiring efforts that the 700 people who went to Orillia enjoyed as ideal holiday…

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Ontario Reformer
Oshawa-On-The-Lake
Edition 01 August 1902

A very severe thunderstorm, accompanied by rain and lightning stuck this camp on Saturday afternoon and raised great havoc. The large dining tent was blown down and the centre poles broken. The headquarters tent was also blown down and part of the contents of the canteen destroyed. One of the small tents was broken down and most of the bedding in the others was very wet afterwards. The occupants of the other tents, had to hang on to their tents for about half an hour or all would have been blown down. On Sunday afternoon another sudden storm came up, but as the officers had timely warning very little damage was done, excepting in the cook house where a large amount of bread was destroyed, almost depriving the boys of their next morning’s breakfast; no order could be got uptown, as the telephone lines were destroyed. However, the younger boys did not suffer any as Mr. Carey kindly offered them shelter in his barn, which was gratefully accepted. However, the younger boys did not suffer any as Mr. Carey kindly offered them shelter in his barn, which was gratefully accepted.

 

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Ontario Reformer
Excursion to Toronto
Edition 01 August 1902

Durham Old Boy’s Association of Toronto has invited all former and present residents of Durham County to be their guests in Yoronto [SIC], on Monday next, as a grand reunion picnic to e held on the beautiful grounds of Dr. John Hoskin, K.C. The Dale, Howard Street of Bloor. A free dinner will be served at12 o’clock, and a splendid program will follow. Cheap rates have been obtained on the Grand Trunk Railway, going by local train only, and returning by any train same day as follows: –

Darlington –   7:00 a.m.                  $1.25
Oshawa et. –  8:00 “                        $1.10
Whitby –         8:00 “                           $ 1.10
Pickering –      8:00 “                          $1.10

 

Ontario Reformer
Kawartha Lakes
Edition 01 August 1902

A Place to Spend a Happy Holiday

Before deciding on a place at which to spend the vacation this summer, it is well to take into consideration the many advantages of the Kawartha Lakes region of Ontario, Canada. As a place for camping the region has no superior. For the most part, the shores of the lakes are untouched by man. Nature is seen in all her grand disorder, there being nowhere that artificially, which to the true lover of nature, often spoils landscape. Pure air and water, each of which in a factor in choosing a summering place are assured in that region. Transportation on the lakes is also amply provided by a steamboat line plying between Lakefield and Coboconk, a distance of 70 miles. There is an additional attraction for the angler, as the fishing in the lakes is very good. The gamey [muskellunge] and black basses are here to reward the sportsman.

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Ontario Reformer
Canadian Prosperity
Edition 01 August, 1902

Canada’s prosperity, at present, is unprecedented. The trade returns for the final year ending June 30th, 1902, exceeded four hundred million dollars – the exact figures being $414, 517, 368, while those of last year were $377, 689, 653, being an increase of $36, 826, 653 or 72 per cent over and above the trade of 1893, which was the last year during the life of the late government.

……..

In proportion to population, the trade of Canada is not considerable more than double the relative volume of trade of the United States. In 1901 the latter, with its seventy millions of people, had a total volume of exports and imports aggregating $2, 301, 937, 156, which proportionately, is not on half of Canada’s trade last year.

This is not due to any epidemic growth in any one line of progress, but the progress along all the avenues of trade. The agricultural increase last year was very remarkable, and the exports exceeded those of the year previous more than 50 per cent. Nor did the manufacturers’ exports fall off, but were ahead of the times in every [way].

 

Ontario Reformer
Ontario Malleable Iron Co. Employees Annual Picnic
Edition 01 August 1902

The employees of the Ontario Malleable Iron Co., with their families and friends, held their annual picnic at Oshawa-on-the-Lake last Saturday. The affair was a success and a day of delight to all who took part in it. When all had assembled the number was computed at between two and three thousand. The event was highly creditable to all concerned, evincing thorough and hearty harmony between employers and employees. The large crowd were accommodated to the utmost by the Street Railway Co. and Mr. Arthur Henry. An excellent program of sports and attractions was provided for the entertainments of all present. The weather, in the morning and afternoon was fine and warm, but towards evening a severe thunder and rain storm was disappointing to many who were just at supper the lawns.

The music furnished by the Oshawa Citizen’s Band afforded delight to listeners on the grounds in the afternoon, and during the evening in the pavilion where dancing was pleasantly indulged in.