The Month That Was – May 1864

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Vindicator

May 4, 1864, Page 2
New Church Bell
The new Bell for St. George’s Church, of this Village, has arrived, and is now being placed in position, ready to speak when called upon. It is from the Foundry of Meneely & Sons, of Troy, NY, one of the best establishments of the kind in America; and it presents the appearance of being in reality, a very fine piece of workmanship. On Sabbath next we will all enjoy an opportunity of judging of its tone and power. It is said to be the largest bell between Cobourg and Toronto, and with favourable weather, will be heard at distances from ten to fifteen miles. Its weight is 816lbs, and its cost, when put up, will be about $350 currency.

Excursion to the Falls
There is some talk of an immense Sons of Temperance Excursion to the Falls being got up for some day next month, by Oshawa Div. of the Sons. The subject is to be taken up by the Division for consideration and final decision, on Monday evening next. The Grand Division of CW assembles at the Falls (Town of Drummondville) on Wednesday the 22nd, and it is probable that that day will be chosen for the excursion, should it take place.

Page 3
Married
At the residence of the bride’s father, Port Oshawa, on the evening of the 14th ultimo. by Elder H Hayward, Mr. Edward Dearborn and Miss Elizabeth A Henry, daughter of Elder Thomas Henry, all of East Whitby.

Anonymous Letters
The party who sent an anonymous letter from Oshawa to a young man in Whitby, is hereby respectfully informed by latter, that no more need be sent, as the subject of that communication is of no importance to him.
Whitby, April 30, 1864

May 4 1864, 3.

May 11, 1864, page 1
Pay Up.
Fair Warning
I hereby give notice to all parties indebted to me, either by note, book account or otherwise, that if their respective amounts are not paid forthwith, I shall take legal steps to recover the same, without further notice. I have waited long enough for the many small amounts due me since retiring from business, and am determined to make a speedy collection of the same at all hazards. I’ll sue every man that does not pay up at once! That’s so!!
DF Burk, Oshawa, Sept., 23rd, 1863

Page 2
A visit to Cedar Dale
On Thursday last we took a walk down to Cedar Dale, a thriving little village just outside the Corporation of Oshawa, on the south side of the grand trunk railway, and but a few rods from the station. Cedar Dale owes its existence to the fact that a splendid location for a millpond and waterpower has, for ages past, for ought we know to the contrary, existed in that vicinity on the property owned by Mr. Thomas Conant, which waterpower two enterprising Yankees named AS Whiting and EC Tuttle purchased in turned to account in driving the machinery of their Scythe, Hoe, and Fork Manufacturing.

The Oshawa Scythe, Hoe, and Fork Manufacturing with established by the two gentlemen above named some five or six years ago, soon after the failure of the Oshawa Manufacturing Company, in the north branch of that companies building. The entire premises owned by that company were soon afterwards sold at option and purchased by Joseph Hall, of Rochester. Messrs. Whiting and Tuttle carried on their business as usual in the old premises, until Mr. Hall’s run of that work became so large as to require the whole shop; when it was mutually agreed that the Oshawa Scythe, Hoe, and Fork establishment should move. Its proprietors, with an eye to the saving of the cost of steam power, examined Mr. Conant’s mill site, and firm in the conviction that it was the spot for them, being close to the railway station, to Oshawa, and to the harbour at Port Oshawa, they soon came to terms period two years ago last January, the axe was the first set at work towards clearing the forest on the site of the now thriving little manufacturing village of Cedar Dale. Not only was the immediate site of the factory an village cleared, but the whole of the flats on both sides of the Creek, which the water was to overflow, were also cleared of trees and rubbish—a thing not often done—and the consequence is that a fine, clear, wholesome sheet of water now fills the basin, instead of its being a dirty pool, build with dead, broken an unsightly trees, an rotten logs, once at once an eyesore and a breeder of disease for the neighborhood. Looking to the possibilities of the future, the dam was constructed in a very strong manner, and a very wide floodway built, so that it is believed that the breaking away of half a dozen mill dams above cannot affect this one.

The factory is built some 10 or 15 yards south of the east end of the dam, the water being conveyed to it by a raceway, along the brow of the hill, on the east side of the flats. All the manufacturing operations are carried on in the one building, which is 266 by 40 feet in extent and one and a half storeys in height. The water wheel, which is placed near the centre of the building, is a small but powerful affair. It is a turbine wheel of about four feet in diameter, but exerts a driving power equal to that of 70 horses…

…So long as Messrs. Whiting and Tuttle make scythes, hoes, and forks in Canada (which we may safely say will be so long as they live at least) they will make them cheaper and better than anybody else can, simply because they know how to do it, and are determined to do it, no matter what it temporarily costs.

May 11, 1864, 3.

May 18, 1864 page 2
Early Records of the Township of Whitby
We give, below, as promised, a list of the names of all the heads of families of the old Township of Whitby in the year 1822, as found recorded on six of the pages of the old record book from which we have been making quotations for the benefit, chiefly, of “our oldest inhabitants.” Following each name, in the record from which we copy, our figures showing the number of males and females in each family, the number over and the number under 16, and the number of servants, or hired men. For the sake of brevity, however, we omit all except the totals. The old Township of Whitby, to which this list relates, is now divided up into four municipalities, viz:—the two townships of Whitby and East Whitby, the town of Whitby, and the village of Oshawa.

Census of the Township of Whitby for the year 1822

Heads of FamiliesTotal of FamilyHeads of FamilyTotal of Family
Matthew Terwilligar6Wm. Maxim4
Samuel Dearborn8Alva Way2
Josiah Cleaveland4Michael Wood[6]
Reuben Warren11[Henry] Crawford3
Charles Annis5John Way3
Samuel Dorman2Lawrence D. Way3
Thomas Henry4James [Han      ]6
William Hall7David Jones5
William Pickel7Cornelius Jones7
Abraham Terwilligar5Israel Gibbs[8]
Charles Terwilligar5John McGregor, senr.3
William Farewell11Matthias Mackey7
Ackeus Farewell10Daniel DeHart, jnr5
George McGill6Samuel Jameyson9
Abraham Coryell10Daniel DeHart3
Benjamin Stone11Jabez Lynde12
George Hinkson8George Paxton4
Thomas Herriman8Hawkins Lynde4
William Karr7Joseph Edmunds5
John Karr9Alexander Armstrong1
John McGregor2John Warren4
Benjamin Rogers5John Demaray8
James Hall7Richard Martin8
Benjamin [Labrae]5William Huntington6
John Elliot3Richard Gardiner10
Joseph [Beuway]3Henry P. Smith6
Peter Lapoint8Thomas Moore7
Lewis Drolette2Edmund Oragan4
Wm. F. Moore5John Furguson1
John Hews3Isaac Beachman2
Richard Amsbary8John Blake5
Rufus Hall11George Moore4
David Demaray10Samuel Moore3
Enoch Davis7Thomas Liddle3
George Dean5Sylvester Lynde1
Josiah Farewell9Wm. Paxton4
Michael Wilcocks3Lawrence Smith5
Joseph Wileigh6Samuel Cochrane6
Joseph Witterfield7Joseph [I Losce][13]
Norris Karr2Stephen Smith7
Godfrey Avickhouser5Nicholas Demaray11
Wm H Wade5John Still[8]
John Starr2Caleb Elsworth11
Aaron Martin, 2nd1Gershum Herrick1
Samuel Demaray2David Young[8]
Widow Anna Martin5Moses Hemmingway9
[Russel Hoag]5Thomas Provost6
John King5Henry McGahan9
James Starr4W. Nancy Smith4
Edward Starr4Parnell Webb3
John Kent4[Ju     ] A Seeley9
Jabez Hall8Hass[  ]rd Watson2
Caleb Crawford9John Quick7
William Marsh8George Townsend5
Richard Demaray10Jacob Dehart5
Joseph Shand2Thomas Dehart[8]
John Williams7Barnabas Malby3
Jonathan Steward7James Young9
Randal Marsh9Thomas McGahan4
Joseph [LaHaire]2Abraham Brown5
Benjamin Varnum8Silas Watson5
Aaron Martin Senr.,13John Allen4
Alex C. Harlow3Ichabod Hodge6
David Stafford2Widow C Young10

Total Inhabitants,742

Accident – We learn that while Mr. Mackie, of Harmony, was on his way to (or from) church in this village, on Sabbath last, one of the horses which he was driving incautiously stepped up on a stick, one end of which flew up and  stuck into the horse’s body, making such a fearful wound that the animal speedily bled to death on the spot. Mt. Mackie appears to be rather unfortunate with his horses, having lost a valuable animal in a similar way only two years since.

May 25, 1864, page 2
Godey’s Lady’s Book – The June number of this best Ladies’ Magazine in the world is to hand.  This issue completes it’s thirty-fourth year, and they have been thirty-four years of regular success in the business of providing a first-class ladies’ monthly. A large amount of space in this number is devoted to patterns for children’s dresses. The Lady’s Book can be had at Allan’s and at Willox’s. Always inquire for Godey’s Book and buy it, and then you will have the best.

Page 3
House in Oshawa For Sale
For sale, on Water Street, Oshawa, that story and a half Frame House next south of the residence of GH Grierson, Esq., together with the Lot of land (half of an acre) on which it is situated. – There is a fine orchard of apple, plum, and pear trees, &c., and a large number of smaller fruit bushes, all in bearing. Will be sold at a great bargain for cash. Apply, if by letter, post paid, to
C. Warren, Oshawa, May 16th, 1864

May 25, 1864, 3.

The Importance of Change in Historical Interpretation

By Jennifer Weymark, Archivist

For the past decade or so, I have been speaking about the importance of changing the traditional historical narrative and how, by doing so, we begin to see a more accurate and inclusive look at our past. This idea has informed my research and changed the way we interpret the history of Oshawa.

According to Dictionary.com, “history is the study of past events, particularly in human affairs”. 

This is a simple, to the point definition that doesn’t truly delve into the complexities of studying and sharing history.  At its heart, history is the study of people and their interactions with the world around them. It is told to us through the lens of the storyteller, and it is through changes to that lens that results in history changing and evolving over time.

The study of history is filled with fact and interpretation.  A great deal of history is about interpreting the facts to understand the human motivation and how that has impacted our lives today.

But historical interpretation is more than opinion. It must be informed by a knowledge of the facts, procured from sources such as government documents, personal letters, diaries, and oral histories, to name a few, and an understanding of how they fit together to create a coherent story of the past.

It is also about understanding that some points of view, some experiences, have been ignored in past historical interpretations. The reasons for this are varied but are based in the fact that the narrative has been typically written to represent the experience of those in power. History has traditionally been interpreted through a very narrow lens.

The first time I began to understand the importance of change and evolution in historical interpretation was when I was in my third year public history course, which, given that I have been at the museum for almost 22 years, was a while ago.  It was in this course that we delved into the need for widening the lens of historical interpretation to allow for a more accurate look at the impact of historical events on people.

The example that stood out for me was in regards to the exhibiting of the Enola Gay in the National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian. The Enola Gay is the plane that dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan and was to be a part of the display commemorating the 50th anniversary of that mission. The proposed exhibit was to have focused on the bombing as the start of the story and would have examined the impact of that decision on the U.S., on Japan, and on the world as a whole.  This would have been a shift in the historical narrative, a widening of the lens through which this event had been examined and it was met by outrage. It was argued that the bombing was the end of the story.  It was the push that ended World War II; it was a technological achievement and needed to be exhibited as such. Eventually the fuselage of the plane was exhibited with no interpretation, simply a sign informing the visitor the name of the plane and that it was part of the Hiroshima mission.

Both of those interpretations were accurate but only one fit the traditional narrative.  

The struggle with shifting historical interpretations and the need to allow for change intrigued me, so much so that it became the basis of my Masters thesis as I examined the similar issues faced by the Canadian War Museum as they were developing the exhibits for their new building.

It continues to intrigue me as I work to research and interpret Oshawa’s history. Oshawa has a really rich and diverse history beyond what has been traditionally written. Re-examining our history and allowing for a wider focus has meant we are telling different stories, we are looking at our historical figures in different ways and we are seeing more of our community in the history being shared.

The Month That Was – March 1868

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Vindicator

March 4, 1868, page 2
Toll Cask – On Monday, Messrs. GH Grierson and W Karr were brought before the Reeve, charged by WH Thomas, with not closing up their fences and thus allowing persons to pass over their property in order to avoid paying toll. The case was adjourned until Saturday next.

Village Council
The council held a special meeting on Saturday evening for the purpose of passing a license by law, and granting licenses for 1868….

Mr. Gibbs, seconded by Mr. Wilcox, introduced a license by-law. The by-law limited the number of Tavern licenses to five, and shop licenses to two. It required Tavern keepers and applicants for a shop license to give a bond with two sureties in the sum of $200 for the proper observances of the provisions of the license act. The village fee is placed at $70, and a shop license at $65. In addition a stamp fee must be paid of $5 each, making the total $75 for Tavern and $65 for shop license. The bar room is to be closed and lights out at seven o’clock on Saturday evenings, and not later than eleven on other evenings. No liquor is to be sold to a person whilst in a state of intoxication, or to any person under eight years of age.— No quarreling, fighting, obscene, or profane language is to be allowed, about the present premise, as also no gambling or raffle. No liquor shall be sold to any person addicted to liquor, after having been requested not to do so by the wife of such person, or by the license inspector. No shopkeeper holding a shop license shall sell less than a quart, and this must not be drank on the premises. No liquor is to be sold after 7:00 o’clock on Saturday evening period of fine of $20 is levied for an infraction of the bylaws.

Mr. Gibbs, seconded by Mr. Glenn, moved that certificates for Tavern licenses be granted to Malachi Quigley, Michael Brooks, DH Merritt and Alphonso Hinds, on production to the Reeve, of the treasurers certificate for the payment of the sum of seventy dollars, and the required bond as set forth in the bylaw.

Mr. Quigley, who was present, complained of the large amount of the license, and still more strongly of the provisions requiring two sureties. He however took out the license.

The Snow Storm
The oldest inhabitant has declared that the snowstorm of Monday and Tuesday, the 23rd and 24th ult., was, unmistakably, the severest ever remembered. Although it extended all over that part of the province west of Toronto, and its eastern limits scarcely reached beyond Belleville, Toronto in its neighborhood seemed to be its centre. In some other places more snow may have fallen, yet here the drifts were higher and more numerous. The drifts in our own neighborhood range from an occasional giant of 14 or 15 feet downwards. The roads north and south were completely blocked. Some of them still remain so; the only outlet being through the woods and fields. Simcoe Street seemed to suffer worse than most others. In many places, the snow extended for a considerable length of perfect level from fence to fence, and in some cases burying the topmost rails. On Wednesday, the stage started for the north, and after five hours driving through woods and fields, managed to reach Columbus, but then had to return to Oshawa again. North of Prince Albert, the drifts were not so bad; The Manilla stage on Wednesday making its regular trip. On the next day, Simcoe Street was dug out, and it now presents, for this part of the Dominion, a curious spectacle, the road consisting of a narrow canal, in some places 6 feet deep with occasional switches excavated in the high snowbanks to enable teams to pass each other. The mail routes from the north were in an equally impassable state.

No council –  the East Whitby Council had no session on Monday. – On account of the storm, the Reeve was unable to get even to Oshawa. He got stuck in a drift, and it was with difficulty he got out. A meeting of the council will be held on Monday next. Pathmasters and others will please take notice.

March 4, 1868, p1

March 11, 1868, page 2
Valuable Property – In another column will be found the advertisement of Mr. M. Luke, offering his residence and adjoining land for sale. Lying on the street between the town and the railway station, and midway between both, it is one of the small number of pieces of property left for sale on this, the most growing street in the town. – Mr. Luke will, we believe, sell very cheaply.

34th Battalion – The following appointments have been gazetted for No. 8 Columbus Company: Lieu. JE Farewell to be Captain, and Ensign Scurrah to be Lieutenant.

Page 3
Union Burying Ground

Near the Residence of Rev. Dr. Thornton, Main Road

As these grounds are very desireabe for location and beauty, parties wishing to purchase lots are respectfully informed that they may have an opportunity by applying to the undersigned or to the care taker, James Carruthers, on the premises.

Alex. Burnet
Chairman of the Committee
Oshawa, March 2nd, 1868

Dr. Clarke
Begs to announce to his friends that he has resumed the practice of his profession, and may be found, as heretofore, at his own Cottage, corner of Athol and Centre Streets, Oshawa
Nov. 25th, 1867

March 11, 1868, p2

March 18, 1868, page 2
St. Patrick’s Day – Yesterday was the festival of Ireland’s Patron Saint. The only speciality here was the holding of a service in the Catholic Church. Everything was quiet; a great contrast to former years, when the day was certain to be celeb rated by a general fight. Yesterday’s celebrations throughout the country were marked by an unusual good feeling and unanimity amongst Irishmen. At Ottawa, Mr. McGee was feted by a union party of Irish Protestants and Catholics; and in Montreal, besides the usual ceremonies in the Church and in the street, there was a social dinner of Irish friends at the St. Lawrence Hall, at which all differences were to be forgotten.

Snow Cases – On Friday last, indefatigable Constable Gurley, at the instigation of the Reeve, summoned some 30 or 40 ratepayers to come to court and be fined for neglecting to clear the snow from the sidewalks in front of certain premises owned or occupied by them. The list was a most respectable one –  being headed by TN Gibbs, Esq, MP, and Dr. McGill, MPP. The majority duly made their appearance at 9:00 o’clock on Saturday morning , and as it was their first appearance, the Reeve allowed them to go provided the sidewalks were cleared that day. As the number of rods to be cleared was many, and the laborers just then a few, some had no resource but to take off their coats and do it themselves. The sidewalks were cleared, but from the bent manner in which several walked, and the agonized way in which the dexter arm was placed on the small of the back, they had evidently become acquainted with manual labour for the first time.

March 18, 1868, p3

March 25, 1868, page 2
Board of School Trustees
Still meeting of the Board of School Trustees was held on Wednesday evening. Present: the Chairman and Messrs. Carmichael, Gibbs, Hodder, Boyd, Fairbanks, Glen and Edwards.

The chairman read some very favorable testimonials in favor of Miss Victoria Halton, now teaching at Prescott. After hearing from Mr. McCabe, who had visited several applicants, Mr. Fairbanks, seconded by Mr. Glen, moved that the secretary be empowered to offer the situation of assistant teacher to Miss Victoria Halton, at a salary of $425 per annum.

The selection of a teacher to fill the vacancy in the second division was left in the hands of the Committee of School Management, in Connection with the Chairman of the Board and the Principal of the School.

March 25, 1868, p3

Remembering the Lives Lost from the 1918 Flu Pandemic

By Laura Suchan, Executive Director

Recently one of my colleagues shared news of a project she was involved in to honour the more than 700 people who succumbed to influenza in the Wellington Region of New Zealand. The 1918 Influenza Kaori Cemetery Project was a two year project to remember those who died in the pandemic by cleaning their headstones, tidying burial plots and researching the family histories.  This project prompted me to think about Oshawa’s Union Cemetery and how many Influenza victims from the 1918 pandemic were buried in the cemetery.

In an earlier blog post about the Spanish Influenza, Curator Melissa Cole noted how the pandemic affected Oshawa.  The Spanish Flu reached the United States in March 1918 and soon after Canada, through troop, hospital and civilian ships sailing from England to Grosse Île.  The Ports of Montreal and Halifax soon became the main routes of infection into Canada, however by late June/early July the Flu spread across the country via the railway.   It came in multiple waves. The first wave took place in the spring of 1918, then in the fall of 1918, a mutation of the influenza virus produced an extremely contagious, virulent, and deadly form of the disease. This second wave caused 90% of the deaths that occurred during the pandemic. Subsequent waves took place in the spring of 1919 and the spring of 1920.  Between 1917 and 1918 the deaths recorded in Oshawa increased by 67 to 213 as compared to 146 in the earlier year.  Still, the situation in Oshawa was better than for many communities.  At the height of the pandemic, beds where placed in the armouries to treat the sick, and all churches and schools were closed to prevent it from spreading. 

To see just how devastating the Flu pandemic was in Oshawa, I turned to the Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas 1869-1948 database for the Town of Oshawa, for the months starting October 1, 1918 until March 31, 1919. Within this database I was able to search for any cause of death listed as “Influenza,” “Spanish Flu,” and “Flu.” I also looked for any case where the secondary cause of death was listed as influenza. In some cases, the coroner listed the cause of death as “Pneumonia” following a case of “Influenza.” If influenza was mentioned, I included the death. This was not in any means a scientific review of the data, however there were a few observations I was able to make.

Observations

  • 50 – number of people who died as a result of the flu or an illness following the flu during the 6 month period
  • 23 – deaths were reported in those 25 years of age or younger
  • 2 months – the age of the youngest victim – Robert Starie
  • 70 years – age of the oldest victim – Alvin Terry
  • 30 – number of those buried in Union Cemetery
  • Week of October 27-November 2 – the deadliest week in the 6 month period with 16 deaths. The previous week saw 15 deaths due to influenza.  These 2 weeks accounted for more than half the deaths reported in the 6 month period.
  • October 1918 – the deadliest month with 35 deaths, followed by November 1918 with 7 deaths, February 1919 – 4 deaths, December 1918 with 3 deaths. January 1919 reported only 1 death and 0 deaths were reported in March 1919.

Remembering some of the victims of the pandemic

Hattie Hewson

Image from FindAGrave.com

Hattie Maud (Ham) Hewson lived on Ontario Street with her husband William when she passed away at the age of 39. Her official death record lists miscarriage and influenza as her causes of death. William passed away in 1960.

Alex Swankie

Image from FindAGrave.com

Alex Swankie was a Private with the 37th Battalion and fought in France with the 60th Battalion C.E.F. He was born in Scotland, November 11, 1891 and was a machinist by trade. According to his Attestation Papers, he signed up for the military in Niagara, June 10, 1915.  He was discharged from the 60th Battalion in early 1917 as the result of a knee injury and was in outpatient treatment in Toronto until October 31, 1918. Alex died February 16, 1919 at the age of 27 of pneumonia and influenza.

Melville and Rose Babcock

Melville and Rose (Darlington) Babcock were married in 1900 and both died within one week of each other from the Flu.  Melville was the first to pass away on October 21 1918 at the Oshawa Hospital after suffering from the Flu for one week and pneumonia for 3 days.  Rose is listed as the informant for Melville’s death. Six days later, on October 27, 1918, Rose also succumbed to the flu at Oshawa Hospital. Rose is buried in Union Cemetery as noted in the death registry however there was no burial location noted.  There is a good possibility he is also in Union Cemetery.

Marjorie Lander

Influenza also touched the lives of two well known Oshawa families. Marjorie Gibson Hoig Lander was a young mother of at least 3 children when she passed away from influenza on November 7, 1918.  Marjorie was the daughter of Oshawa’s Dr. Hoig, and she married coal merchant Elgin Vesta Lander in 1910.  Lander was a successful coal and wood merchant, and the couple lived at 221 Simcoe Street North, just south of Parkwood.  Daughters Alice and Virginia were born in 1913 and 1915 followed by son David in 1917. Marjorie was only 31 years old when she died.  Her husband Elgin remarried in 1927 and died in 1976.  Both are buried in Union Cemetery.

Advertisement for Elgin Lander’s coal and wood business, 1911 Oshawa Business Directory, OPL Collection

Gladys McGregor

The year 1919 was not kind to the McGregor family.  Daughter Gladys Mae died in February of the flu, aged 13.  Her father Robert McGregor, a harness maker, died in June 1919 from Tuberculosis and mother Lucy Parish McGregor died in November 1919 of nephritis (swelling of the kidney). All three are buried in Union Cemetery.  Robert and Lucy had other children who would have been left orphans by their parents’ deaths.  

To find out more about the 1918 Influenza Kaori Cemetery Project please visit https://1918influenzakarori.weebly.com/home.html


To view Laura’s research of people in the Town of Oshawa who died of Influenza between October 1918-March 1919, view this document:

The Month That Was – February 1872

All articles originally appeared in the Ontario Reformer

February 2, 1872
Page 2
The Prosperity of Oshawa.
On every side we are seeing our town advancing. Really costly, sightly and substantial buildings of brick are being erected. The new brick hotel of Mr. Hobbs will compare favourably with almost any hotel in the Province, as to size, appearance and thoroughness. Mr. Quigley is preparing to erect a large hotel, early in the spring, on the Fuller lot, which is to be surmounted by an ornamental French roof. Let us hope that as good entertainment for travellers may be found within their walls as their exterior would seem to indicate.

In stores we have the [tasty] and commodious ones lately erected by Messrs. Cowan and Fowke. Mr. John Wilson is preparing to erect a number of stores on the ground of the late fire on King Street, which, as viewed from the drawings thereof, promises to be excelled by a few such structures in our cities. Mr. James B. Keddie, also, proposes to continue the block to the east by a structure similar in style for his own use.

Passing down Simcoe Street, we observe the compact and well-built new brick residences of Messrs. Dickie, and Thornton – both of which have ornamental roofs covered with slate. The palatial residence of TN Gibbs, Esq., is said to rivals that of the Lieutenant Governor at Toronto; and is one of which our town may be justly proud. Mr. Chas. A Mallory is already preparing to erect, early in the spring, the first-class brick dwelling upon a portion of the McGregor property. This property is thought some of the best sites for residences now available. We hope to see many residences erected during the summer on this property, as we understand the present owner, (Thomas Conant,) is about to put the whole of it on the market. This will afford sites for buildings according to the means of purchasers, as to front or back lots relatively.

Centre Street will then be opened out nearly all the way to South Oshawa, and will make one of our prettiest streets, especially for driving.

Many other residences have been erected and are in process of erection north and west of the cabinet factory.

One is almost constrained to say, that in order to keep pace with the improvements in the various parts of our town we should frequently pass through its various wards as new streets are being opened up, and new houses are being erected; we almost lose our reckoning after a few months absence. It is estimated that at least one hundred houses were erected in Oshawa last season. This is probably within the mark. Let us hope for a similar result in 1872.

Prosperity to our various manufactories, and a healthful, steady growth to Oshawa.

There is one thing we might observe, this: that as a rule houses erected are paid for by the proprietors, without incurring and incubus of debt. This fact argues volumes for a steady growth, without any such sudden inflation and corresponding depression as we have seen exemplified in some of our neighbouring towns.

One more word as we close. We have many public spirited men of means in our midst who are intimately concerned with the welfare of Oshawa, and whom, we feel sure, gladly assist new industries, which would add to the growth and wealth of the place.

Let manufacturers come along, and let us make Oshawa doubly noted throughout our Dominion for the excellence of its manufactured articles. In manufacturers alone we look for our continued prosperity.

Feb 2, 1872, p3

February 9, 1872
Page 2
The assembly in Mr. Cowan’s new store on Wednesday evening was a decided success. About seventy couples, from Toronto, Whitby, Bowmanville, Oshawa, and other places, were present, Dancing commenced at about nine o’clock and continued till between three and four in the morning.  The arrangements were complete, and all enjoyed themselves thoro’ly. The music of Davis’ quadrillo band, from  Toronto, was pronounced the best ever heard in the place. The supper was first-class; furnished by Mr. Cullen of Whitby.

The Town Hall Question – A public meeting to consider the above question will be held on Tuesday evening next, 13th inst., and not Monday, as previously announced. A full attendance of ratepayers is requested.

Feb 9, 1872, p3

February 16, 1872
Page 2
Fire – about 3:00 o’clock, on Sunday morning last, the Boot and Shoe store of H. Wilkinson was discovered to be on fire. The alarm was given, and the fire brigade soon on the spot; but, owing to the engine being frozen, it could render but little assistance. The fire quickly spread to adjoining buildings, and was only arrested in its course by the exertions of the Hook and Ladder Company, who worked well. After a little exertion on the part of the fireman, the engine was got to work, and soon all danger of the fire spreading to the Commercial Hotel, which was thought it would at one time, was past . The losses by the fire are Messrs. Wilkinson, Brennan, and Hobbs, on stock and furniture, partly covered by insurance; And Mrs. Woon and Mr. Cherry, owners of buildings.

Mr. Thomas Conant believes in encouraging manufacturers to come amongst us. He has given an acre of land to the hat manufacturing company, and yesterday instructed Mr. English to draw up a deed for the same. We believe the above company intend building a large factory, where they will give employment to 200 hands, men and women. We like to see these things going on, it is healthy for the town. Do it some more somebody else.

Page 3
For Sale
On Colborne St East, two lots and orchard, with one and one-half story frame building. Also two lots and two houses with orchard, on Brock St East, the whole contained in one block. Terms- $500 cash. Balance in yearly installments. Present rental, $250
William Deans
Oshawa, Feb 9, 1872

Feb 16, 1872, p4

February 23, 1872
Page 2
Opening of the new Baptist Church
The church was opened for divine service on Sunday last. Three sermons were preached; In the morning by the Rev. Dr. Fyfe, afternoon by the Rev. W. Stewart, and in the evening by the Rev. Dr. Davidson. At each of those services the church was filled to its utmost capacity.

On Monday evening a team meeting was held in the church, which was again crowded. After tea, TN Gibbs , Esquire, was called to the chair; And after a few introductory remarks, called on the Rev. Mr. Patterson, pastor of the church, to read the report of the building committee. …

Short speeches were then made by the chairman, the Rev. Messrs. Myers, Scott, Stewart and Davidson, each of the speakers congratulating the pastor and members of the church on the beautiful building which they had erected; and hoped that the balance yet required to pay off the debt on the church would be subscribed before the meeting closed. …

The church is a very handsome [edifice]- inside and out, built of white brick, and is of the Romanesque style of architecture, 36 x 30. The tower on the east corner of the building is not yet finished; but when completed will add greatly to the appearance of the building. The entrance is on King Street, by to doors, one on each corner; and from the one on the east corner access to the gallery is obtained, which runs across the front of the church. The pulpit is American style- a platform with a small movable desk, and is fitted up very neatly. Mr. Langley, was the architect; May brothers, masons; Gay, & J. & R.B. Dickie, carpenters ; and J. Brewer, painter and glazier.

Feb 23, 1872, p3