The Month That Was – January 1946

Toronto Daily Star, 02 Jan 1946: 25.
Domestic Help Wanted
Oshawa
A girl or woman for house work, modern 6 room house, residential section. General Motors official. 1 child 7; liberal time off; live in or out. State age, experience, references. Box A504 Star

Toronto Daily Star, 03 Jan 1946: 8.
Greater Toronto and Nearby Centres
Brother is Toronto Victor, M’Callum Runs in Oshawa

Oshawa, Jan. 3 – Three candidates for mayor, including the present office-holder, WH Gifford, and 17 candidates for 10 seats on council, remained on the lists for election, Jan 7, as qualifications closed here yesterday.

Contesting the three-year tenure of Mayor Wilfred Hyland Gifford will be two former councilmen, Harry O. Perry and Frank N, McCallum. The latter is a brother of HE McCallum, elected head of the poll in Toronto’s elections, Tuesday.

Property owners also will vote on approval of a $250,000 debenture issue toward a proposed community centre costing $750,000. The community centre proposal is expected to figure largely in the campaigning for council posts.

The Times-Gazette, 17 Jan 1946: 1.
Two Fires Yesterday
Two fire alarms were registered in Oshawa during the last 24 hours. The city fire department extinguished both blazes without trouble and there was little loss of property. At 2:15 yesterday afternoon the department was called to extinguish a chimney fire at the home of Mrs. E. Sayers, 253 Nassau Street and Frank Barager, 603 Cromwell Avenue summoned firemen to extinguish a blaze under the hood of his automobile, believed to have been caused by defective wiring. The latter call came at 5:30pm

More Mail From Stolen Bag Found
Further debris from the mail bag alleged to have been stolen by a group of Oshawa youths last Dec 13th, was discovered in the rear of the factory opened by the Skinner Company Ltd. On Simcoe St. S.

“This part of the mail was also torn in pieces,” said Norman Moran, local postmaster. “It is of no value.”

The Times-Gazette, 17 Jan 1946: 2.

The Times-Gazette, 17 Jan 1946: 7.
Amazing Display of Electric Science
Bell Telephone Representative Transmits Music on Beam of Light

Bordering almost on witchcraft and supernatural, modern miracles of electric science were displayed to the members of the Oshawa Kiwanis Club on Tuesday noon, at their weekly luncheon meeting, when Robt. H. Spencer, of Toronto, Public Information Representative for the Bell Telephone Company of Canada, delivered an amazing exhibition of tricks, during his extremely interesting address, “Your Voice as Others Hear It.”…

“You could talk to the moon by telephone if it were possible to have space repeater stations along the voice highway,” declared Mr. Spencer. “There is no limit to the distance over which one can talk by telephone, providing repeaters can be used.”

Speaking on “Giving Wings to Words,” Mr. Spencer sent music along a beam of light, amplified a heartbeat, a hundred million times and enabled his audience to hear the noise that muscles make when they contract, in order to illustrate the complexity of the communications equipment which was required by the armed forces of the United Nations. The use of the photo or electric [eyt], now so vitally important in motion pictures, was vividly demonstrated by use of the various pieces of elaborate electrical equipment on hand, weighing 600 pounds. …

The Times-Gazette, 17 Jan 1946: 15.
Will “Crack Down”
Chief of Police Owen D. Friend has served notice on residents of the Oshawa area that local police will do their share in helping to stamp out the illegal carrying of automatic pistols and revolvers. In an interview with the Times-Gazette he said his department would “crack down” on all owners of unregistered guns.

The law regarding registration of firearms was in force during the war but since the last registration in March of last year a large number of revolvers and pistols have been brought home as souvenirs by members of the Armed Forces. In some instances these weapons have not been registered with the authorities and through theft have fallen into the hands of lawless persons.

Canadian law enforcement agencies are making every effort to stamp out the wave of violent crime which is sweeping the country. For that reason everyone who has in their possession an automatic pistol or revolver is asked to see to it that they are registered. There is no cost involved, the only requirement being that the weapon be brought to the police station where it permit will be issued.

The Times-Gazette, 17 Jan 1946: 3.

Toronto Daily Star, 19 Jan 1946: 5.
Coal Truck Helper Killed in Accident
Oshawa, Jan 19. – Eslia Berry, 16, was instantly killed yesterday when he slipped from the running board of a coal truck driven by William Davidson, Oshawa police reported.

Constable McCammond, who investigated, said Berry had been standing on the running board as the truck moved on to the weigh scales to check the load. When he jumped down, he apparently slipped beneath the rear wheels of the vehicle, the constable said.

The Times-Gazette, 26 Jan 1946: 1.
Alex Hall Crown Attorney
Gets Full-Time Appointment Succeeding AF Annis, KC, Who Resigned on Request
New Appointee Formerly Held Position – Was Mayor of Oshawa in 1937 – Recently Returned From Active Service Overseas

It has been officially announced that Major Alexander C Hall, well-known Oshawa barrister and former incumbent of the position, has been appointed Crown attorney and Clerk of the Peace for Ontario County, succeeding Allin F Annis, KC, who has held the position for the past eight years. The appointment was confirmed by Order-in-Council this week. The appointment will be effective from February 1 and Major Hall will devote his entire time to the position, discontinuing his private practice as a barrister. The Order-in-Council sets Mr. Hall salary at $4500.

Is Former Mayor

Major Hall, who conducted a law practice here from his graduation in 1929 until he enlisted in the fall of 1940, has served a previous term is Crown attorney. He received the appointment in September, 1933, when JA McGibbon, KC, resigned to take his place on the bench as county judge for Victoria and Halliburton counties and held the position until October of the following year when he was succeeded by GD Conant, KC. Serving on the city Council in 1935, he was elected mayor of the city for the 1937 term and was also conservative candidate for this riding in the 1935 federal election.

The Times-Gazette, 26 Jan 1946: 8.

The Times-Gazette, 26 Jan 1946: 8.
Girl Guide Council Holds First Meeting
The first meeting of the new Oshawa Girl Guide Council was held on Thursday at the home of the chairman, Mrs. T. E. McMullen, Simcoe St., North. Mrs. E. A. Collins read the minutes of the last meeting at the association and moved that the book of the old Oshawa Association be closed. Three local associations are to be formed in the near future for the North, Central and South districts.

On Thinking Day February 22, the council hopes that all Guides and Brownies will wear their uniform the whole day. Thinking Day, it will be recalled, is the birthday of the late Lord Baden-Powell and Lady Baden-Powell, both of whom asked that their common birthday be recognized not with gifts, but with every Brownie thinking on that day of Guides and Brownies in other countries.

The Times-Gazette, 26 Jan 1946: 1.12
What Council Did
The matter of straightening out the lot situation at the north end of Oshawa Boulevard where certain of the owners, each of whom had more than one lot, had accidentally built on the lot next to their own, was referred to the chairman and vice-chairman of City Property for a further report and recommendation. One of the owners, Robert Hales, who had had the property surveyed recently, appeared before council.

The Month That Was – December 1867

All articles originally appeared in The Oshawa Vindicator

Please note – there are two articles, transcribed as they appeared in 1867, describing the grim death of a woman.


December 4, 1867
Page 1
A man in Toledo, Ohio, lost his wife by death at nine o’clock in the forenoon, at three o’clock in the afternoon he buried her, and at six o’clock in the evening he was married again.

Page 2
A monster hotel will be put up at Niagara next summer – Canadian side

Five hundred thousand dollars changed hands on the recent New York election

The health of Mr. McGee – We learn that Mr. McGee still continues in very ill health.  He is quite unable to take his seat in the Commons in consequence of ulceration of the ankle.  His general health is very much depressed, and though advised by his medical attendants to take stimulants to keep him up, he nevertheless refuses to act upon that advice. Under these circumstances his recovery cannot be expected to take place very rapidly.  Indeed, it is questionable whether he will be able to attend to his parliamentary duties again be the adjournment.
*This article appears to be referring to Thomas D’Arcy McGee, Father of Confederation, and the first of two Canadian political assassinations.

Mechanics Institute – on Friday evening last a sale of the periodicals for the current year was held.  Owing to the inclemency of the weather the attendance was not as large as would otherwise have been the case.  A portion only of the magazines and papers were sold, and these conditionally.  They will again be offered for sale tomorrow night. Any one not present at the last meeting will have an opportunity then to purchase any o the large number of periodicals on the list of the Institute. Those who desire to obtain the [cream] of the literature of the day at about one-half the price that they would otherwise have to pay should not fail to be present tomorrow evening at eight. A meeting of the general committee is called for seven the same evening.

The Hall Works – In order to wind up the estate of the late Joseph Hall, these extensive premises will be sold by auction on Wednesday next. The sale will be held on the premises at two o’clock. The whole of the machine shops, plant, &c., will be offered, forming one of the largest lots ever put up by auction in the Dominion.

December 4, 1867, page 2

December 11, 1867
Page 2
The Local Representation
The eligibility of Dr. McGill to a seat in the House of Assembly seems likely to create an owling amongst old and musty statues that will delight the heart of a chancery lawyer. The case has assumed complications unexpected at first sight. During the term of Mr. Mowat’s reign, over the post offices of the land, the Doctor was offered either a coronership or a magistracy, he chose the latter, and was so appointed. A year or so ago, at the solicitation of Mr. Gibbs, he was appointed a coroner. – But section 17 Cap. 100 of the consolidated Statues declare that no Coroner can be a Justice of the Peace. – The Doctor was a Justice before being a Coroner, and the question arises, does the latter invalidate the former office or vice versa. An old statute of Edward VI seems to favor the latter view. – We understand that this is the reason why Dr. McGill has received no fees for the inquest he held. Since his appointment, the Dr. has acted as a Justice of the Peace, consequently either his acts as a coroner or as a magistrate are illegal. The case may yet come before the Legislature for adjudication, and the probabilities are, there will be no election at least for some time.

December 11, 1867, page 1

Fire Alarms – On Friday evening, a fire alarm was rung. It was caused by a chimney in Pringle’s Hall being on fire. The flames were very fierce, and as the wind was very high, it for a time seemed dangerous, but it was soon put out. Shortly afterwards the chimney of Mr. Gurley caught fire. The gamins made a rush to get into the house, but Mr. Gurley knew better than that, and kept them out with his constable’s baton. Scarcely had this burned out when a chimney of Dr. Clarke’s house was discovered to be on fire. All burned themselves out without damage.

Enlargement – The congregation of the Wesleyan Methodist Church, Columbus, have made arrangements to enlarge their burial ground, and erect a new building for the Sabbath School, and also a new shed. Nearly the amounts required has been obtained, the members having subscribed very liberally.

Hotel Changes – Next spring, Mr. Pringle will move into the large new hotel now being erected by Dr. Eastwood on the old Arkland property. – Mr. Merritt has leased Woons’ hotel for a term of years and will move in when Mr. Pringle moves out.

December 11, 1867, page 2

December 18, 1867
Page 2
Frozen to Death
On Wednesday night last, about six o’clock, as a man on horseback, was going from Oshawa to Whitby, near Gadsby’s corners, he discovered a woman on the road side endeavouring to walk, but apparently unable to do so. He dismounted, picked up a bundle which he found near her, and endeavoured to lead her along. She was so benumbed with the cold that he found it impossible to get her along. He proceeded to Constable Campbell’s and notified him of the case of the unfortunate woman. The constable at once proceeded to the spot and found her speechless. He got her into Mrs. Gadsby’s hotel, but frozen as the woman was, Mrs. Gadsby refused to receive her into the house because she was colored. The constable, instead of compelling the heartless landlady to keep her, procured a cutter, put the already more than half-dead creature into it, and he and an assistant dragged her for two hours through the piercing cold of that bitter night about the streets of Whitby, seeking to obtain some place of shelter. At about midnight he got her into Spurrill’s hotel. Dr. Carson was sent for, but of course by this time the woman was frozen almost solid. He tried every remedy, but she died before morning. Such are but a portion of the facts of a case in which was manifested an utter absence of common sense and Christian charity, such as, for the credit of our civilization, seldom occurs. In the centre of a town, a human being, and that of a woman, freezes to death because no one would take her in!

Christmas Tree – A social entertainment in aid of the funds of the Sabbath School will be held in the Christian Church on Christmas Eve. One of the articles of the entertainment will be a Christmas Tree, the fruit of which will be distributed amongst the audience. Addresses will be delivered by several ministers and gentlemen of the town, and the choir and Sabbath School children will sing some of their choicest pieces. The admittance fee will be a voluntary offering at the door.

December 18, 1867, page 2

For sale.
The subscriber offers for sale, cheap, a DOUBLE PLEASURE SLEIGH, and a young Gray Horse.  Apply to John Hyland, Sen. Oshawa, Dec. 16, 1867.

December 18, 1867, page 3

Page 4
Removal – The subscriber begs to inform his customers that he has removed his Carriage Shop to Bond Street, west of H. Pedlar’s Stove and Tin Shop. Whilst returning thanks to his old customers, he hopes to retain their patronage. – Strict attention will be paid to repairing Buggies, Waggons, Sleighs, &c.; also general repairing.  J. Craig

December 25, 1867
Page 2
Dickens realized $20,000 out of his four readings in Boston.

Brazilian bug necklaces are becoming fashionable in New York.

Mr. and Mrs. Brown of Canaan, NY, have been arrested for killing their child to obtain an insurance of $85,000 on its life.

The Frozen Woman – The colored woman who was frozen to death at Whitby was named Johnson.  She had lived for some time near the lake shore, to the east of Oshawa. Some eight weeks since she came into town, and being homeless, Mr. Fletcher, the barber took her in. She left suddenly about four weeks ago, and for a time was unheard of, but after a few days she again returned, having, in the meantime, being living at an Indian camp four miles from Oshawa. She again disappeared and was not heard [from] until found frozen. The Town Council have properly resolved to investigate the circumstances of her death, and find out upon whose shoulders the responsibility rests. A special committee has been appointed for the purpose.

Christmas Cheer
We are pleased to note that the excellent idea initiated by Mr. Glen, of presenting each of his married employees with a Christmas Turkey, has been this year followed by Messrs. Whiting and Cowan. Over 120 birds were required to supply the two firms. The happy heads of the largest families were presented with the heaviest turkey, and we hope this will encourage the less fortunate paterfamilias, not to remain always in the receipt of the lesser gifts.

Earthquake – On Wednesday morning last, an earthquake was heard and felt throughout the eastern part of the Dominion and a portion of the northern part of the State of New York. A letter from Kingston under date of the 18th says: –

“At ten minutes to three o’clock this morning, I felt a tremulous motion of the earth and a loud rumbling noise, which continued about three minutes. I got up, for the bed and chamber furniture was in a state of vibratory motion. I looked, the air was clear and serene, and the rumbling sound appeared to die away to westward.”

The shock was slightly perceptible here, several persons having felt the trembling, and heard the noise. No damage was done at any place.

Provided for – Mr. Toms has for a second time provided the Vindicator Christmas dinner by presenting us with a pair of young toothsome turkeys, for which he has our best bow. It is comforting to think that even in this uncharitable age there remain some with tender hearts for the unfortunate.

December 25, 1867, page 3

Page 4
Lots for Sale.
The subscriber will sell by private sale, village lots on Centre and Avenue Street. Terms east. RG McGrigor. Oshawa, Nov 6th, 1867.

The Month That Was – November 1866

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Vindicator

November 7, 1866, Page 2
Gold discoveries – gold has been discovered in some quantities in the Township of Madoc, back of Belleville.  St. Wm. Logan does not promise any large quantities but the people do not put much faith in his predictions.  Land upon which gold indications have been discovered has been sold at a tremendous price.

A Narrow Escape – on Monday last, Mr. Wm. Hezzelwood, of East Whitby, bad a narrow esacpe from being shot.  Accompanied by his nephew and son, he went out for the purpose of shooting rabbits.  As the nephew who was in the rear of the others, was crossing a fence, it gave way with him and threw him to the ground.  The concussion discharged the gun.  A portion of the charge grazed the side of the head of Mr. Hezzelwood, whilst his little boy was slightly wounded in the thigh by another portion.

November 7, 1866, page 1

Mr. Carswell in Philadelphia – the following is an extract of a letter from a resident of Philadelphia, dated October 28th. We are glad to see that Mr. Carswell is likely to obtain a reputation in the city of Brotherly Love equal that he enjoys in the other cities of the Union which he has visited: – “Mr. Carswell lectured last Tuesday evening here.  The audience were perfectly delighted, and say he can scarcely be excelled by Gough, who is considered here to be the finest lecturer of the day.  All he wants to be his equal is the reputation.”

November 14, 1866, Page 2
The United States Government is about to advertise for tenders for iron headstones to place over the graves of Federal soldiers who was killed or died of disease during the late war – The number required is a fearful 475,000.

Canadian residents in the States are being served with notices to quit on or before the 5th of December, by order of the Fenian Brotherhood, on pain of death.

Victor Hugo is writing a history of England.  The work, which will contain all the events of the second half of the eighteenth century, is not expected to be ready before the beginning of next year.

November 14, 1866, page 3

Burned – Early on the morning of Friday last, the mill of Mr. Henry Bickle, known as the ‘Old Starr Mills,’ situated in the 6th concession of Whitby, was burned to the ground.  The miller was in the mill until after eleven p.m., and then as far as he could discover all was safe. It is supposed to have originated from the stove pipe. The mill was wholly destroyed.  Mr. Bickle was insured for $4,000, about half the loss.  The wheat in the mill, amounting to six thousand bushels, belonged to Messrs. Gibbs & Brother. They were partially insured, their loss will probably be $4,000.

When is Thanksgiving Day? – It seems very strange that the Governor has not yet proclaimed a Thanksgiving Day for the present year.  There surely never was a year during which we as a people here received greater cause to be thankful. Three times have we been threatened with lawless invasion, and still we are saved from the devastations of war.  The dryness of the spring, the coolness of the summer, and the wet weather of the harvest threatened to destroy our crops, but out barns are filled plenty. Cholera has afflicted nearly every other nation, whilst we have been mercifully spared. Add to these the opening of a market after the abolition of the Reciprocity Treaty, the good prices obtained for our produce, the preservation of the land from internal dissentions, and we have a year which God has marked by a great display of his Providential care and goodness towards us.

November 14, 1866, page 4

Dedication of a New Church – The Ebenezer Bible Christian Church, situated on the 1st Con, Darlington, was dedicated on the Sabbath last.  On Monday a tea meeting was held which was largely attended.  $116 was realized which was placed to the benefit of the building fund. A subscription list was afterwards circulated when, a sufficient amount was obtained to entirely free the Church. The cost of the church was about $2,000.

November 21, 1866, Page 2
The Columbus Rifles – The match for the medal presented to the company by the people of East Whitby, was shot on Saturday last.  The attendance of members was good, although the day “was most unpromising.” The average shooting was very fair. The medal was won by Private G. Greenwell, with a score of twenty four points, and the money prizes, the first was taken by Private Smith, and the second by Corporal Portcous.

Petty Thieving Again – Last week as Mr. [Pake] was lighting the lamps of the Town Hall, for the Drill Association, he left the room for a few minutes, and when he returned he found that some person had entered and made off with two of the lamps. The boards about the Skating Rink have been gradually disappearing for some time past, but not content with this some person last week broke open the house, stole a lamp, all the lamp chimneys and every length of stovepipe.  What with incendiary fires, and petty thieving, the council will have to employ a detective – The rewards which have been offered during the last few weeks would yield a sharp man a good remuneration for this season.

November 21, 1866, page 3

November 28, 1866, Page 2
JH Surratt, the alleged accomplice in the murder of President Lincoln, was discovered serving in the Papal Zouaves, under the name of John Watson.  He was arrested upon a demand of Gen. King, but afterwards ran the guard, leaped over a precipice, and escaped into Italian territory. The Italian authorities are on the alert, and are endeavouring to re-capture him.

Nova Scotia anti-confederation papers point exultingly to the fact that a portion of Liverpool where thieves and other bad characters congregate is called “Upper Canada.”

Birth – In Oshawa, on the 22nd inst., the wife of Cornelius Robinson, of a son.

The Month That Was – October 1873

All posts originally appeared in the Ontario Reformer

October 3, 1873
Page 2
Gone from our Gaze – One Paul Horn, a tenant on Mr. Charles Farewell’s property, disappeared from this locality a few nights ago.  It seems that he was in debt to Mr. Farewell some three hundred dollars, and having sold his grains and surreptitiously disposed of his farming implements he slung his gentle hook for the land of Uncle Sam.  He leaves us a sorrowing creditor to the extent of two years subscription. “May jackasses sit on his uncle’s grace.”

Fire – an alarm of fire was sounded about midnight on Wednesday evening, and it appeared that a house situated on the north side of the town, was in flames.  It burned to the ground before anything could be done.  The loss will be about $600, Mr. Jas. Horn, of Whitby, being the owner of the building.  As it was unoccupied, it is supposed to be the work of an incendiary.

Scandal in Whitby – The county town is just now highly excited over what is known as the “Campbell difficulty.”  It seems that Mr. Robert Campbell, of the firm R & J Campbell, claims to have good grounds for accusing his wife of infidelity; alleging, it is said, to have found the partner of his happiness flagranti delicto.  Be that as it may he has a suit of crin. con. against her to come off at the Fall Assizes in Toronto. The lady (a daughter of the Rev. Peter Byne) on her part repudiates the charge, and has sued her spouse for $10,000 damages for defamation, the party of the third part also entering a similar action for a like amount.  On Wednesday 26th, Mr. Campbell forcibly ejected his wife from the home which he thinks she has disgraced, and on Tuesday last he was ‘np’ before the magistrates for that he did “assault, beat, ill-treat and drag her down stairs the said Eliza Maria” his wife.  The case is still pending.

October 3, 1873, page 2

October 17, 1873
Page 2
Runaway – a lively runaway occurred on Simcoe Street, on Wednesday morning. A horse belonging to Mr Western, cooper, started for some unknown locality in a southerly direction from Fowke’s Corner.  Luckily for the driver, who had lost control of the brute, he was stopped by Mr. T. Lawless before any damage was done.

Thanksgiving Day – The Ontario Government have issued a proclamation ordering Thursday, 6th November prox. To be observed throughout this Province as a day of Thanksgiving.  We believe all religious denominations in this Village will hold their annual thanksgiving services on that day, and so afford a public opportunity of returning thanks to the Author of all our Bounties in a manner befitting a Christian community.

October 17, 1873, page 2

October 24, 1873
Page 2
Hard on the cow – Rumor saith that an Oshawa butcher killed a cow the other day, belonging to another man,  It was a case of mistaken identity, of course, but a sad mistake for the cow.

Education in Ontario – The High Schools of this County take high rank among the schools of this Province, as judged from the results the recent Examination this speaks highlight for the efficiency of the teachers.

Accident – On Monday last a little boy, a son of Mr. John Barnard, merchant, met with a painful accident while playing on the verandah of his father’s house.  By some mischance he fell, breaking the outer bone of the small part of the right leg. Under care of Dr. Coburn he is progressing favorably.

The Agnes Wallace Troupe – This troupe played to full houses here on Friday and Saturday evenings last, notwithstanding adverse weather on the latter night.  They created a most favourable impression, and proved themselves worthy of the reputation they have earned as one of the best troupes travelling.  They will receive a cordial welcome if they should return again.

October 24, 1873, page 2

October 31, 1873
Page 3
Hallowe’en – This evening will be the anniversary of All Halloween, and great will be the strife between cabbage and cabbageheads.  We trust the bhoys won’t perpetuate any tricks of a serious nature, but we would not interfere with innocent sport; they are welcome to all the vegetables in our neighbours’ cabbage gardens.

The Month That Was – September 1864

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Vindicator

September 7, 1864
Page 2

Library, or Reading Room
As will be seen from a sketch of the proceedings at the several meetings held, a Mechanics’ Institute and Library Association has been organized for a second time in Oshawa.  It is to be hoped that the institution will be more successful this time than it was the first, and there is no reason why it should not.  The first one was a miserable affair and a large amount of property was sunk in it, in one way and another, but not by anybody looking after its affairs very closely or endeavouring to keep the institution up.  Nobody seemed to take any ordinary degree of interest in it, even as a library association, and it never was anything more.  Few meetings were held in connection with it, and in the course of time its library was neglected, suffered to go to ruin by want of usage as well as bad usage, and eventually sold for ‘a raere song.’ With this experience before then, no doubt the Directors of the newly organized association will pursue a very different course from that which resulted so disastrously to its predecessor.  Our village is tolerably well supplied with library works thro’ our Common School library that was, and which now is our ‘United Grammar and Common School’ library.  If there is any deficiency of reading matter in that library, it can be supplied by the United Board of Grammar and Common School Trustees in such a way as to give us one complete village library, all under one management. And now that the Grammar School has an interest in the School Library, there ought to be an additional sum of money voted towards procuring new and interesting works for the replenishment of its shelves every year. By doing this, there will be no need of the funds of the Mechanics’ Institute being used up, as those of the former one were, in purchasing a library, leaving an insufficient sum for other purposes of more importance. Let the whole of the funds be devoted to procuring a superior course of lectures, and other entertainments for the winter evenings, and providing a Reading Room containing a number of the leaving English, American, and Canadian papers, and the institution cannot fail to prosper.  But let its funds be used up in purchasing needless and expensive books, and it can hardly avoid, except by taxing somebody’s time and labor quite too severely, meeting with the fate of its predecessor.

Steam up – On Monday last steam was introduced for the first time into the new engine at E. Miall and Co’s cabinet factory, and the boiler and engine, etc. tested. The shafting is not yet all in position and consequently the machinery was not moved.  The engine is a fine piece of mechanism, for a first attempt, and is a good illustration of the capacity of Joseph Hall’s Mill and Job department.

September 7, 1864, page 1

Raft Ashore – On Monday morning last a large raft of square timber towed by the Steamer Hercules, went ashore and broke up near Port Oshawa.  The wind blowing from the lake at the time, the greater part of the timber was washed ashore.

September 7, 1864, page 3; for more on Mrs. PA Henry, read HERE

September 21, 1864
Page 2

The School House
The work of making the addition of 40 feet to the west end of the Union School House is rapidly approaching completion.  The mason work was completed some two weeks ago, and the roof has been put on and the floors laid.  Two small gables have been erected over each doorway in addition to the original plan as given out to contract, which will add considerably to the appearance of the structure, which otherwise would have had an exceedingly unpleasant look in an architectural point of view.  The new rooms will be very airy ones, the floor of the under story being two feet lower than that of the old portion, and the ceiling of the upper room being attached to the roof, giving it somewhat the appearance, overhead, of the Presbyterian Church.

Conviction Quashed – We find the following in the Chronicle’s report of the last Quarter Sessions: – “Conviction of John Stokes for selling liquor on Sunday. – In this case Mr. J. Stokes, hotel keeper, of Oshawa, appealed against the conviction of G.H. Grierson, the convicting magistrate, by which a fine of $20 was imposed for selling liquor on Sunday. There was no respondent’s name in the papers. Conviction quashed. Mr. Lyman English appeared for the appellant.”

Where was our Reeve when the case was called?

A New Grocery Store – A new grocery, provision and crockery store is to be opened out in a few days, in the store in Gibbs’ block, formerly occupied by L. Vancamp, and lately by Gibbs & Bro. The Proprietors are Messrs. Bremner & Urquhart.  Their advertisement will appear next week.

September 21, 1864, page 3

September 28, 1864
Page 2

Excelsior Machines – Two splendid pieces of mechanism left Joseph Hall’s establishment on Monday last for Hamilton. One was the Reaper and Mower to be awarded at the Provincial Plowing Match to the best plowman, as mentioned in our last, and the other a Thresher and Horse Power for competition at the Provincial Exhibition. – They are, doubtless, the two best machines of the kind ever manufactured in any part of the world.

Birth – At Whitby, on the 19th inst., the wife of William Laing Esq., Mayor of Whitby, of twin sons.

Died – At Whitby, on the morning of the 19th inst., deeply and deservedly regretted, Louisa Amelia, the beloved wife of William Laing Esq., Mayor of the Town of Whitby, aged 40 years and six months.

September 28, 1864, page 3