The Month That Was – October 1870

Oshawa Vindicator, October 5, 1870, page 1

For Sale
A Brick House, 36 x 24, 2 ½ stories high, with stable, shed, driving house, &c., connected to the Lot on which they stand, being 58 square perches, the property of John Robinson, Port Oshawa. Terms liberal. Apply to either Ralph Robinson, Oshawa, or John Thompson, Paitley Mills, Whitby.

Newspaper ad for Weaving at Columbus
Oshawa Vindicator, 5 October 1870, page 1

Page 2
Whitby and East Whitby Fair
Every preparation is being made by the directors to make the Fall Fair to be held here on the 26th, better than any that has preceded it. Fifty three dollars have been collected in the town, as special prizes for equestrianship. Two of these are a portrait valued at $15, to be given to the best lady rider, and one valued at $8, to the best lady equestrian under fifteen years of age, both presented by Mr. JE Hoitt. The prizes for equestrianship have been divided into four classes, three prizes being offered to young ladies under 15, and three to boys under 16 years of age. Several new prizes have been offered in the photographic department, for the purpose of inducing a strong competition. Mr. J Porter offers for special prizes of $18, for suckling colts after Sir Walter Scott. The bills have been issued to the several directors and can be had of them.

Newspaper ad for Walter Wigg & Son, furniture & undertaking
Oshawa Vindicator, 5 Oct 1870, p 3

Died
In Oshawa, on the 4th inst., Louisa, wife of JB Warren, Esq., aged 64 years. The funeral will leave the residence of her husband for St. George’s Burial ground, at 3pm to-morrow (Thursday).

Newspaper ad for Wolfenden's Marble Works
Whitby Chronicle, 6 Oct 1870 p4

Oshawa Vindicator, October 12, 1870, page 2
As the funeral of the late Mrs. Warren was on its way to the St. George’s Burial Ground Thursday, it was met by the waggon of the Dominion Telegraph Company, which frightened some of the horses. In the fright, the carriages were backed upon each other, and one, that of Mr. Burk, of Bowmanville, was forced into the ditch and broken.

Mr. W. Rundle has a bill against the town of $17.50 for damages done to his horse by a broken street crossing. The hole is repaired now.

Wanted
A first-class servant girl, two kept in the family. Good wages given. Mrs. JO Guy. Port Oshawa, Oct 10, 1870

Newspaper ad for George Gurley's tailoring business
Oshawa Vindicator, 12 Oct 1870, p 3

Whitby Gazette, October 13, 1870, page 2
The Harvest of 1870
The following is the annual report of the GTR officials of the harvest in this locality: …

Oshawa – hay, very light and not an average crop; Wheat, very light crop, average not over 10 bushels per acre; Barley, average 15 bushels per acre; Peas, average 20 bushels per acre; Oats, an average crop; root crops good; Quality of grain very fine, having been secured in splendid condition.

Oshawa Vindicator, October 19, 1870, page 2
The schooner Kate, of this port, was blown ashore in the gale Monday night, near Cobourg. She was loaded with barley belonging to R & A Smith. The grain was insured. No one was lost.

In the same blow, a schooner loaded in the harbor carried off posts and a portion of the wharf to which she was fastened.

By the New York papers we see that Mr. Carswell is keeping up his old time reputation in that city. He leaves soon on a lecturing tour in the Southern States, under the auspices of the National Division of the Sons.

Stolen or Strayed
From Lot 6 2nd Concession East Whitby, on the 2nd Oct., a RED COW, with white spots on left hip and left shoulder, with star in her forehead, three years old. Anyone returing the same will be liberally rewarded.
Sarah Terry, East Whitby, Oct. 18, 1870

Newspaper ad for Atkinson's Drug Store
Oshawa Vindicator, 19 Oct 1870, p 3

Whitby Gazette, October 20, 1870, page 2
Masonic Charts – We have received from Dr. Vars, of Oshawa a sett of masonic charts, copies of which should be in the hands of every “brother of the mystic” in the country. The charts are magnificently engraved, and cleanly and neatly printed and, besides illustrating the different grades and forms of Masonry, are beautiful ornaments for the parlor at home. Parties can be supplied with the charts by Dr. Vars, Oshawa, or at this office.

Newspaper ad for hats
Whitby Gazette, 27 Oct 1870, p 4

Oshawa Vindicator, October 26, 1870, page 2
Oshawa Fire Brigade – The following offices were duly elected at the regular annual election for 1871:

Brigade Officers – PH Thornton, re-elected Chief Engineer and Treasurer; Jos. Craig, Assistance Chief Engineer; R. Dillon, Brigade Secretary

Fire Co. Rescue No. 1 – Thos. Hall, Captain; R. Burdge, 1st Lieut; T. Kirby, 2nd Lieut; B. Robinson, 1st Branch; E Martin, 2nd Branch; ——- Best, 3rd Branch; W. Trewin, Sec’y; T. Lukes, Treasurerl T Hern, Steward.

Hose Co. Rescue No. 1 – O. Manuel, Captain; G. Graham, 1st Lieut; J Mitchel, 2nd Lieut; Ed. Nickle, Sec’y; Geo. Wilson, Treasurer.

Dreadnought Hook & Ladder Co. – Geo. Kelly, Captain; C. French, Lieut; A. Cameron, Treasurer. Sec’y not elected.

All members in connection with the Oshawa Fire Brigade, are requested to meet at the Fire Hall to-day, at one o’clock, sharp. They will muster in the evening at the appointed time to form a torchlight procession, (weather permitting).

Newspaper ad for Village taxes to be paid
Oshawa Vindicator, 26 Oct 1870, p 3

Whitby Gazette, October 27, 1870, page 2
DEATH OF DR. ROLPH
Dr. Rolph died at Mitchell on Wednesday afternoon of last week, at the advanced age of 78 years. As his name and efforts have been very intimately connected with the history of Canada, it is but right that his death should receive more than a passing notice. He was a man of most excellent parts –in science and the law, as well as in politics. Referring to him, a contemporary, the London Free Press, says: He was a reformer that always had a “policy,” and the downfall of the family compact was due, in a great measure, to his exertions. Being implicated in the rebellion of 1837 intentionally or by mistake…, but after the subsidence of political troubles returned to it, and entered the government in 1851 under Mr. now Sir Frances, Hincks. During his day he aided in the settlement of the Clergy Reserves difficulty; saw Reciprocity gained; was present at the birth of the Railways in Canada; and witnessed Upper Canada rise from the condition of a wilderness to the dignity of a nationality. In later years he established the Medical School, in connection with the Victoria College, and labored assiduously and with much success as it Principal. He was a man of kind heart, and a sound head. His natural abilities were great, but were heightened by a wide culture. As an orator his eloquence was proverbial, and no man of the day was listened to with more pleasure and instruction by the people than the “old ma eloquent.” The flow of his language was steady and uninterrupted, his articulation sweet and distinct, and he always made a deep impression.

His life has been a most useful one ; devoted to his fellow-creatures rather than to himself, and his memory will be dear to all that knew him or were acquainted with his career. Since 1856 he has not taken any active prominent part in political affairs, though his counsel was not neglected. He leaves behind him an honored name an unblemished reputation, which will long live, and with may make the wise prevail, upon recounting his history, that there were more like “good old Dr. Rolph.”

Newspaper ad for Lowes & Powells
Whitby Gazette, 27 Oct 1870, p 4

Page 2
THAT EARTHQUAKE – On Thursday morning last, between the hours of ten and eleven o’clock, Canada was visited by a slight shock of earthquake. The “quake” appears to have visited nearly every place in Ontario and Quebec, (if we are to believe the telegraph reports.) and to have shaken several towns in the United States. At Greenwood village, the shock was felt by Mr. Fred Meen, in his store, and by Mr. Samuel Green, while a person a few years distant in a hotel was entirely ignorant that there had been an earthquake. Again, some men working in a barn, a mill or so from Greenwood, were terribly frightened at the shaking of the building, and ran out, fearing it would fall. The shock appears also to have visited Whitby, and – a telegram to the Toronto paper affirms – lasted from three to five minutes. This startling item may be true, but, after diligent inquiry, we have not found the first person that knew a word about the earthquake, until the Toronto papers were received on the following morning. Nevertheless, the report MAY be true ; and of such be the case, the people of Whitby ought to be ashamed of themselves, to have a real live earthquake in their midst and to be ignorant of its whereabouts. It is really too bad. Where, we ask, were the police? We will candidly admits that, at the time mentioned, there was a good deal of shaking in town; but we really thought it was caused by the Court of Assizes, then in session. Most assuredly there was staggering, but, honestly, in our innocence, we believed that rot-gut played a lone hand in it. But we may have been mistaken, and a real earthquake might have been with us. If so, we are really sorry that we didn’t know.

Married
On the 19th inst., at the residence of the bride’s brother, in East Whitby, by the Rev. Dr. Jeffers, John S. Larke, Esq., publisher and editor of the Oshawa “Vindicator,” to Miss Elizabeth Baine, of Oshawa.

The Month That Was – September 1868

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Vindicator

2 Sept 1868, Page 2

Runaway – On Wednesday last, a horse belonging to Mr. King, hitched to a light waggon, ran away. Mr. King was engaged in moving some rubbish preparatory to putting up an addition to his store occupied by Messrs. R. and A. Smith, when the horse walked off and became frightened by the load. Turning down Simcoe street, it tipped load and waggon against the horse and carriage of Mr. Morgan, hitched to a post. The latter was seized and quieted before it could make off, and further damage was saved. The damage to Mr. King’s waggon was slight.

Another Horse Shot – As one of the volunteers was practicing quick loading with a Snider riddle, in the rear of the premises of Messrs. Gibbs, Lobb & Co., the cartridge was exploded. The ball passed through the wood shed of Mr. JO Henry, into the stable of TN Gibbs, MP. It then entered the right shoulder of one of his carriage horses, a valuable blood made. Mr. Smith, of the Toronto Veterinary College, was telegraphed for and came down, but he could not find the ball. The mare is doing as well as can be expected, and may possibly recover.

Patents – The list of patents granted for the year past has been published. It is of unusual length, numbering 379. The following are those to persons in this county. They are all for fourteen years

No 2659, Joseph Dick, the younger, of Oshawa, Machinist, ‘A certain new and useful improvement in the rake, in ordinary use, in connections with the Reaping Machine, for removing the Grain, as cut from the table thereof, to be called ‘Joseph Dick’s Junior, Improved Harvester Rake.’ – (Dated 26th June, 1868.)

Newspaper ad for Hawthorn's Boot and Shoe Manufactory, and there is a picture of a boot on the ad
Oshawa Vindicator, 2 Sept 1868, page 3

Advertisements
Photographs
Mr. JO Henry’s Photograph Gallery Will be opened on Saturday next, with every facility for a first class business. Oshawa, Aug. 26th, 1868.

Page 4
Union Burying Ground
Near the residence of Rev. Dr. Thornton, Main Road
As these grounds are very desireable for location and beauty, parties wishing to purchase lots are respectfully informed that they may have an opportunity by applying to the undersigned or to the care taker, James Carruthers, on the premises.
Alex Burnet
Chairman of the Committee
Oshawa, March 2nd, 1868

September 9, 1868, Page 2
Assault – On Saturday night about twelve o’clock, a stranger coming from Whitby was struck on the back with a large stone thrown by some person secreted near the bridge, over the creek. He was [seriously] injured and was found by constable Gurley lying upon the sidewalk. He recovered soon after and was enabled to walk off. The miscreant who threw the missle is yet unknown, although one or two are suspected, and a sharp eye is kept upon them, Had the man been struck on the head, his life would have been endangered.

Newspaper ad for St Joseph's Select School, Oshawa
Oshawa Vindicator, 9 Sept 1868, page 2

Mammoth Plums – The Vindicator establishment was favored with a basket of mammoth plums, from JO Guy, Esq., Reeve of East Whitby. – Twelve of them weighed nineteen ounces. They are the Duane Purple. We hope Mr. Guy’s trees may never be troubled with worm or robber.

16 Sept 1868, Page 2
Changed the Date – The Fall show of the Whitby and East Whitby Union Agricultural Society, will be held on Thursday the 15th of October, and not the 22nd as announced last week. This change has been made as it has been found that it will not interfere with the fair at Bowmanville, as nothing will be done there other than receiving a few entries, on that day.

Newspaper ad for RC Steele & Co., Grocers
Oshawa Vindicator, 16 Sept 1868, page 3

23 Sept 1868, Page 2
Whalen – Whalen has behaved himself in a less violent manner since the trial than before. It is reported that the reason for the long delay between the sentence and the date of execution, was to give the Local Government an opportunity to introduce and carry a bill to have all prisoners condemned to death executed in private. American papers, as well as Canadian, agree that the verdict of the jury is a righteous one. The American Fenians have indulged in a little threatening, but upon the whole are comparatively mild. The Doctors have examined Buckley, and report that his insanity is feigned. Eagleson and Enright have not yet been admitted to bail.

Note – this article is discussing the verdict of the Thomas D’Arcy McGee murder trial.  McGee was shot and killed in Ottawa in April 1868. He denounced the Fenian Movement, a group dedicated to Irish independence, and was found assassinated outside of his Ottawa home. Patrick James Whelan, a tailor, was arrested. He was found guilty and sentenced to death on September 15, 1868; the public execution took place on 11 Feb 1869. At the time of the initial arrest, 40 others were also arrested, including Buckley, Sir John Alexander Macdonald’s cabman, and Peter Eagleson, a tailor in Ottawa, likely who is being referenced in the article.

House and Lot For Sale
The House and Lot now occupied by Mr. Robinson, South Oshawa. For terms, apply to Mr. John Bone, South Oshawa. E Bone, Oshawa, Sept 16, 1868

Newspaper ad for JO Henry's Boot and Shoe Store
Oshawa Vindicator, 16 Sept 1868, page 1

30 Sept 1868, Page 1
Dr. Clarke begs to announce to his friends that he has resumed the practice of his profession, and may be found, as heretofore, at his own Cottage, corner of Athol and Centre Streets, Oshawa. Nov 25th, 1867.

The Month That Was – July 1862

Content Warning – there is an article in this post, describing a death by drowning in a tub.

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Vindicator

July 2, 1862, page 3
Slavery– Mr JA Maitland, a highly talented gentleman who has for some years been literary editor of the Richmond Enquirer, and who was made his escape from the rebel capital about two months ago, lectures tonight in the Corinthian Hall, at 8:00 o’clock. He is an able speaker, an Englishman by birth has now seen slavery as it is, and will doubtless give the facts of the case.

Page 3
Yesterday morning, while Mr. James Gibbons, teamster to McElroy’s Hotel, was passing down street with a horse and waggon (sic), the horse became unmanageable, and when near Mr. Wellington’s Cabinet Factory, shied off into the ditch among some old buggies, &c., which were brought to the blacksmith’s shop for repairs. The driver was thrown out and had his collar-bone broken, besides being more or less bruised in various parts of his body. When first taken up he was quite insensible, but soon became conscious, and is now in a fair way of speedy recovery.

July 9, 1862, Page 2
Cedar Dale Factory
Decidedly the biggest thing in the shape of a pic-nic ever got up in Oshawa or vicinity, was the demonstration connected with giving to the new works of the Oshawa Scythe, He, and Fork Company the name which heads this article. Preparations were made by the committee upon a pretty broad scale, and numerous invitations sent out, the first of them only two days previously, but their calculations as to the turn out of people were exceeded by a hundred per cent. The company of citizens of Oshawa and vicinity, which took part in the celebration, numbered fully one thousand, according to the most careful estimates. To feed such a crowd of people a large supply of provisions was necessary, but abundance for the purpose was brought by those who participated , and all seemed to enjoy themselves to the full. Three tables, each running the whole length of the storehouse, were decked with almost everything in the shape of provisions which could please the appetite, and hosts of vases of flowers, to please the eye, while at the head of the center table stood a most gorgeous boquet (sic), presented to Messrs. Whiting & Tuttle by Mr. & Mrs. Corbet. Each table was set to accommodate eighty persons.

Page 3
Gone to Europe – Four young men from Oshawa started for the old world, by the Canadian steamer “Jera,” which left Quebec on Saturday last. – We allude to Mr. Samuel Pedlar, well known throughout Canada as the “Glebe agent;” Mr. George Blamey, for some years past in the employ of Messrs. WH Gibbs & Co, of this place; and Frank and William Gibbs, cousins, the former a son of TN Gibbs, Esq., and the latter of WH Gibbs, Esq. – They intend, as a matter of course, to see everything to be seen in the grand International Exhibition, if possible, and visit their relatives in different parts of England, returning in the fall.

Newspaper ad for Groceries at David F. Burk's
Oshawa Vindicator, July 2, 1862, page 3

Property Unclaimed
Used at the late picnic, and now at the office of AS Whiting & Co.: – 11 white plates; 10 plates of different patterns and colors; 1 tea saucer; 1 tin plate. The owners are requested to call and claim their property. Thanks for their use. AS Whiting & Co.

July 16th, 1862, Page 2
New Style of Fanning Mill
Our advertising columns contain an announcement respecting a newly patented fanning mill, recently invented and now being manufactured by Mr. Martin, in Oshawa. The mill differs in appearance very much from the ordinary fanning mill, and the inventor claims that it differs equally in the quality of its work – effectually separating oats from wheat, for instance, by one run through the mill. The show is not half the size that it is in the common fanning mill, and does not shake violently, or sideways, by moves slowly and easily forward and back, without any jerking motion. In fact the whole machine is almost noiseless in its operation, and runs much easier than any fanning mill we ever took hold of. The crank is at the opposite end of the mill from the drum and fans, and the latter are operated by means of a belt, instead of cog wheels. Mr. Martin has built four of these mills, and is now at work on two dozen more, with some farther improvements added, which, he thinks, will render his mill so perfect as to run all others out of the market, upon a fair test of their relative performances.

Newspaper ad for Martin's Fanning Mill
Oshawa Vindicator, July 16, 1862, page 3

An Orange Celebration
The Orangemen of South Ontario celebrated the anniversary of the Battle of the Boyne on Saturday last, by assembling at Greenwood, with the exception of the Columbus brethren, who went to Prince Albert. A first-rate dinner was served up, shortly after their arrival, at both the hotels – Shaw’s and Stirling’s – after which an impressive address was delivered by the County master, Bro. J. Weir, in which, though standing on the portico of a hotel, he dealt some heavy blows upon what he justly considered the curse of the Order – the use of strong drink by its members.  He was followed by WF McBrian, of Raglan, in a very appropriate speech, also by HJ Macdonell and T Moody, of Whitby. An appropriate and interesting sermon was also delivered by the Rev. GB Viner, the English Church incumbent of Greenwood and Duffin’s Creek, in front of his own residence, which was listened to with marked attention. The different Lodges separated for home at an early hour, and the Oshawa brethren arrived about nine o’clock, well pleased with the manner in which the day had been spent.

Page 3
Child Drowned in a Tub – On Saturday afternoon the infant daughter of a man named McMillan, residing on King street west, was drowned by falling into a tub in which there was some water about five inches in depth. The mother left the child at the door of the house while she proceeded to hang out some clothes on a line for drying. On returning towards the house a short time afterwards, she discovered the child in the tub, and on lifting it out found it to be dead. An inquest was held on the body by Coroner Scott, when the jury after hearing the facts, returned a verdict of “accidentally drowned.” – Leader1

July 23, 1862, Page 2
Wounded Canadians – the Saint Catharines Journal says: -Among the severely wounded in the recent engagements before Richmond, was Mr, AE Samson, son of Mr. Gilbert Samson, of this town (St. Catharines). Mr. Tenbrœck and Mr. H Wilson – both from this town – were in the same battles, but escaped unhurt. The latter took ten prisoners alone. Both are lieutenants in one of the regiments in Heintzelman’s division. In the list of wounded, in the late battle before Richmond, is the name of Lieut. Frederick G. Sanborn, of the 5th Maine, late of Sherbrooke. His name also appears among the killed. Thomas Senior, formerly of Niagara, was wounded in the action before Richmond of July 1st, and is now in the hospital at Annapolis.

An Ugly Picture
Almost in the heart of our village stands, or rather leans, just now, about the ugliest and most dangerous specimen of what was once a respectable building, which in the eyes of many of our villagers have ever been beheld. The store recently occupied by Mr. J Hyland, likely a good many useful buildings still standing in Oshawa, was once one of the best structures of which the village could boast; but as a business stands, it has lately been pretty nearly eclipsed by the more handsome and spacious structures of modern times period it stood, also, too much in the background, so its proprietor thought-it being several feet further from the edge of the sidewalk than some other buildings in the same row. So Mr. Hyland preceded to have it moved forward, and by the advice of some of his back-street friends, he was induced to place it plump out against the sidewalk, several feet closer up on the street then the general line of buildings to the east and west- leaving, in fact, not an inch of room for the erection of steps upon which to ascend to the front doors. The unusual encroachment upon the walking space of the sidewalk, and the inappropriateness of an old building occupying so extra prominent opposition, excited a good deal of dissatisfaction in the minds of the neighbors and people generally, and it is said that the keeping of a strict watch upon the building, was the only thing which prevented it being put farther out into the street. Some thought it ought to go farther out, and others farther in. Finally, it having been definitely asserted that the proprietor would neither move it in himself, without compensation, nor allow other parties to move it out- which it would seem they were prepared to do gratuitously- some of the leading businessmen prevailed upon him to allow them to hire the carpenters to move it back a couple of feet. This was done, at a cost two a few liberal minded individuals of the sum of $20, and the stone foundation was progressing, and in another day or two would have been completed. But on Thursday morning last, at a few minutes before 2:00 o’clock, a crash like that of the loudest thunder was heard by some who slept in the neighborhood of the building, and on rising in the morning, the first intelligence of the day was that the building which had been the cause of so much remark, had been tipped into the street! Crowds gathered about the now sorry looking wreck, at all hours of the day and evening, and discussed the manner in which it was, or might have been, upset, the reason it was done, the probable parties that did it and their number, the possibility of raising it again, etc etc; and much sympathy was expressed with the unfortunate owner, as well as with those who had invested their funds in moving it back for him. The building was not completely thrown down, so doubtless that was the intention of the parties who put it out of the perpendicular; yet, one corner of it being in the cellar, it leans over the sidewalk at a most unpleasantly dangerous angle.

So much for the history of the matter. And now that ever ready question comes up, what’s to be done? As the building now stands, and has stood for a whole week passed, it is liable to fall, at any moment, upon the heads of innocent passersby. Is it to be left there for another week to jeopardize life and neighboring property? Or will the Council put enforce the ordinance respecting nuisances, and obstructions upon the streets and sidewalks, or somehow see that the ugly and dangerous picture is removed? A fitting reward, also, should have been, ere this, offered for the discovery of the parties who upset, or rather down set the building under cover of darkness, for if such deeds are suffered to go unreprehended by our Village Fathers, there is no knowing to what dangerous lengths they may be carried.


  1. This incident unlikely happened in Oshawa as this article was originally published in a newspaper called ‘The Leader.’ The location of this paper is unknown at this time.

The Month That Was – June 1944

The Times-Gazette, 01 June 1944
Corvette Crew Is Welcomed

Gifts Presented At Civic Ceremony Monday At Peterborough

Peterborough, May 30 – “A sailor’s life is one of great hazard and whatever the fortunes of war may carry you, our thoughts and supplications will be with you. We hope that when the war ends you will come back to visit us, and meantime we will do all we can to help you,” said Mayor Hamilton, addressing the ship’s company of H.M.O.S. Peterborough at the welcoming ceremonies help in Riverside Bowl Monday evening.

There were six officers and 54 ratings of a crew that will eventually comprise upwards of 95 men present at the ceremony.

George McDonald, chairman of the Corvette committee, presented a box, of the same kind that every member of the ships company will receive, to one of the ratings called to the platform for the occasion, a sort of symbolic transfer of the equipment garnered by the committee to the men for whom it is intended. While many youngsters milled around the makeshift stand determined to be in on the unwrapping of the package, the sailor, a leading telegraphist from Verdun Que., proceeded to undo a large box of comforts which included face cloths, handkerchiefs, shaving soap, razor blades, toothpaste and toothbrush, comb, nail file, chewing gum, chocolate bars, tins of soup and still other gifts even unto woolen articles. While the sailor tried on a leather jacket, Mr. MacDonald commented humorously, “If it’s too large, he’ll wear it.” In a moment, however, he was able to announce with satisfaction, that the jacket did fit.

Ad for the Oshawa Rotary Fair
Canadian Statesman, 1 Jun 1944, p. 5

The Globe and Mail, 05 June 1944, 23.
Oshawa Public Schools

Require for Sept 5th, qualified lady assistants for grade positions. Must have at least 2 years experience. Initial salary according to qualifications and experience. Applications giving full particulars of qualifications and experience will be received up to and including Sat., June 10, 1944. No personal applications unless requested. W. Gordon Bunker. Business Administrator. Board of Education. Oshawa.

Black and White ad for War Work - Men and Women, Youths and Girls
Canadian Statesman, 1 Jun 1944, p. 5

Toronto Daily Star, 07 June 1944, 3.
Record RCAF Raid Helps Clear Path for Invaders

London, June 7 – (CP) – In a quick follow up to the great invasion-eve assault on the French coast, the RCAF bomber group set a record last night during its participation with the RAF in the attack on coastal defences.

Some 5,000 tons of bombs were dropped by the RAF and RCAF heavy bombers and at least 1,000 tons were dropped by the Canadians. Targets were roads, railways and bridges back of the beachheads, destruction of which would delay German reinforcements. …

The City of Oshawa squadron was the first back from the beaches in the morning. Group Capt. MacBrien led the first three Canadian squadrons, accompanied by Wing Cmdr. Lloyd Chadburn, of Aurora, Ldr. RA Buckham, of Vancouver, and Sqdn Ldr. Walter Conrad, of Richmond, Ont.

Toronto Daily Star, 7 Jun 1944, 8.
Robert beats, chokes him jeweler unconscious hour

Oshawa, June 7th- city and provincial police maintained a sharp watch over highways, rail and bus terminals last night and today for a man said to have been wearing the uniform of the US ferry command, who entered the jewelry store of Fritz von Gunten, 66. After beating and choking the proprietor the wanted man robbed the store of an undetermined amount of jewelry, police said.

Von Gunten is an awkward is in Oshawa General Hospital with cuts on his head and left hand and bruises about his throat and body. Police said he had been beaten over the head with a blunt instrument. Hospital officials said his condition was “improving.”

Inspector Wilbur Dawn of the Oshawa police said it would be impossible to assess the amount of jewelry stolen until the proprietor recovered sufficiently to check over his stock.

“We found Mr von Gunten lying in a pool of blood on the floor of his store.” Inspector Dawn stated. “His groans attracted the attention of the men in the lunch counter next door and they gave the alarm.”

James Edgar, who was painting the interior of the lunch counter, said: “ I heard an awful yell and came down from my ladder and looked into the Chinese laundry next door, but didn’t see anything.” Police said von Gunten was so badly beaten that he lay unconscious for over an hour before recovering sufficiently to call for help.

The jeweler told the police he had no warning of the assault. “The man came right in and struck me over the head and beat me before looting the showcases of rings and watches” he said.

*Note: This news event was also reported on by the Globe & Mail. They provided additional details such as the address to the store (125 King St.), and that the wanted man was seen boarding a TTC Bus for Toronto. It was Dr. FJ Rundle who gave details about the state of Mr. Von Gunten.

Black and White ad for movie times at Oshawa's Regent Theatre
Canadian Statesman, 8 Jun 1944, p. 3

The Times Gazette, 17 June, 1944
Freedom Our Birthright

Tomorrow Oshawa will celebrate the 729th anniversary of the signing of what has frequently been called, “the first Act of Parliament.” It was on June 15th, 1215, that King John, one of England’s worst kings, unwillingly signed the 48 articles of a document that during the ensuing few days was still further documented into 63 chapters of the Magna Charta. There remain now by four signed copies of the charter, but they are jealously guarded as something of priceless sentiment.

Apart from the peculiar circumstances of its origin this charter has been regarded through the years that followed its dramatic signing in the meadows of Runnymede, as a charter of wellnigh sacred principles. This is not to be wondered at, for it embodies the highest ideals of English liberty. We use the word ‘English’ advisedly for it was in England that this enunciation of the principles of the rights of free men was so harshly wrested from an unscrupulous, despotic monarch. On the clauses of its various chapters, our modern laws are based. Many additional laws have since been contributed to our wellbeing; but Magna Charts remains the standard towards which all British subjects, wherever domiciled, may look if they desire, as is their due, to draw themselves up and say, “I am free born.”

We must hold fast to this our heritage. During the stress of war we have willingly though temporarily, yielded some of our hard won freedom. But when peace returns, we must make sure that these are restored. For example, let us make sure that no one can ever delay, or deny justice to our citizens. Let us do our part also to ensure that the Four Freedoms of the Atlantic Charter of 1940 based in great measure on the Magna Charta, are not just pious hopes and eloquent phrases. The path of our forefathers since 1215 has been rough and rugged. Perfection lies still far beyond our vision. It is well that we celebrate anniversaries such as this – lest we forget. Human nature being what it is, unfortunately, we forget too soon. 

The Globe and Mail, Jun 21, 1944, 4.
Lloyd Chadburn dies of collision injuries
By Allan Nickleson

London, June 20th (CP).- Wing Commander Lloyd B Chadburn, a fighter ace who ranked with Canada’s greatest airman, was injured fatally a week ago in a collision while leading his wing on operations over France.

His plane exploded on impact with another aircraft which crashed in flames and a subsequent RCAF announcement said that the 24 year old Aurora, Ont., pilot, holder of a double DSO and the DFC, “died later of his injuries.”

The tall, quietly spoken Chadburn had a record of 14 enemy aircraft destroyed, three probably destroyed and eight damaged but you never would learn that from this ace who rose from the ranks. …

Chadburn’s first squadron was adopted by the city of Oshawa, which name it now bears. That squadron had the best Canadian record at Dieppe where Chadburn shot down one of the four aircraft the squadron destroyed without last to itself.

Black and White ad for Coca-Cola and Hambly's Beverages, using the imagery of a soldier and two young boys
Canadian Statesman, 29 Jun 1944, p. 5

Canadian Statesman, 22 Jun 1944, 1.
Dept. of Highways Post-War Program a Four-Year Plan

In the Ontario Department of Highways’ post-war program a four-year plan is being laid down by Minister George H. Doucett, calling for a total expenditure of $180,000,000 at $45,000,000 a year. Employment is expected to be given over the four years to at least 25,000 men.

It includes extensions to the existing Queen Elizabeth Way, east from Oshawa, ultimately to the Quebec boundary.

Work is now progressing east of Oshawa to Newcastle and plans are prepared to reroute the construction to fit in with the development of the St. Lawrence in Eastern Ontario…

The Month That Was – May 1862

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Vindicator

Content warning – an article in 21 May 1862 discusses a death by suicide.

7 May 1862, Page 2

Postmasterships
Mr. Francis Kellar, of Whitby, has been appointed Postmaster of Oshawa, in place of Mr. D. Smith, who is appointed to the Whitby office. We hope Sidney and the wire-pullers will get things fixed to suit them pretty soon. The hangers-on of Whitby are very well pleased with the position of the cards at present. Mr. Kellar’s being stationed at Oshawa instead of Whitby leaves the Whitby office still open for aspirants – Mr. Smith’s appointment being only one of convenience for the time being. He is worthy of a better position, and will get it, if the last of the Hincksites is not ejected from office too suddenly to allow of the papers being made out. We are sorry to part with Mr. Smith at Oshawa, for we believe he gave the best of satisfaction to all having business at the office.

Page 3

Notice
Valuable Property For Sale in the Village of Oshawa

The building at present occupied by Henry Binge, Druggist, and Frank Taylor, Jeweler, situated on the northeast corner of King and Simcoe Streets, known as Sutton’s Block, will be sold by public auction at Woon’s Hotel, on Thursday the 15th day of May next, at 12 o’clock noon. Terms made known on day of sale.

John Warren, Wm. Bartlett, Assignees of WJ Sutton’s Estate. Oshawa, April 22nd, 1862.

Coal! Coal!
Just received Ex “Royal Oak” from Oswego, a lot of Blacksmiths’ Coal, which will be sold cheap for Cash or approved credit. A supply will be kept constantly on hand. James O. Guy, Port Oshawa, April 15th, 1862

7 May 1862, page 3

14 May 1862, page 2

Ran away, but got Caught
On Saturday evening last, while the members of the Oshawa Rescue Fire Company were returning to their quarters, after going through with one of their monthly evolutions, a span of smart looking horses from the country, not being accustomed to such sights, took fright at the red-coated gentlemen and their machine, and started on a gallop with their load. The firemen slipped anchor and gave chase, in right earnest. The horses passed up King, down Centre, and on to Athol Street, where they were intercepted by some half dozen of the fleetest of the Rescuers, and after knocking down one who attempted to grapple the bits, were “brought to,” almost instantly. Immediately the wagon box was filled with cargo of firemen, several of whom got hold of the “horse strings: to act as moderators, while others sent the air with ebullitions of exultation over their bravery in capturing the team. … The damage done on occasion was very slight – nothing further than distributing a few bags of wheat, bran, &c., along the street; but it might have been worse, and shows that people should not be so reckless of life and property as to leave their horses standing in the street without being securely tied. – Communicated

Page 3

Torch Lights,
This is to caution all parties against carrying Torch Lights, or cutting Pine Timber on my premise – particularly on the north 60 acres of Lot No. 4, Broken Front, as the penalties of the law will be strictly enforced. John Wilson, East Whitby, April 22nd, 1862

Died
On the battle-field at Pittsburg Landing (Tenn.) on Sunday, April 6th, First Lieutenant Frank N. Doyle, of Company H, 16th Iowa Volunteers, formerly of this office, in the 24th year of his age.

“Poor Frank! He little thought he was to die so soon; yet he died nobly, with his face to the foe, encouraging the men to retreat in good order. We buried him on yesterday, April 8th, on the field where he so nobly fell, with nought but a pine board with his name, age, rank, date of his death, and his place of residence on it to mark the spot where the young hero died. There he lies, far from home and friends, in an enemy’s country, in the wilds of Tennessee, within a short distance of the Tennessee River. You may judge of the feelings of those who had been so long associated with him, on this occasion. Often we think of him and murmur a prayer for him who sleeps the long sleep.” Letter from an officer of the regiment, published in the Dubuqe Daily Times.

Newspaper notice for property for sale by auction
14 May 1862, page 3

21 May 1862, page 2

Distressing Suicide in Oshawa
On Friday morning last, the inhabitants of our village were startled at an early hour, with the intelligence which went the rounds with marvelous speed, that Mr. Martin Bambridge, Blacksmith, one of the oldest and best known residents of the place, had been found dead, at five o’clock, in the loft of his stable.

A jury was soon summoned to investigate the matter, and a Coroner’s Inquest was held, before Dr. Jos. Clarke, at the residence of the deceased, at 9 o’clock. …

The jury, after hearing [the evidence] agreed upon their verdict without leaving the room, which was that the deceased was found hanged, and that, in the opinion of the jury, he came to his death by his own hands.

The deceased was widely known and highly respected in the community, and his untimely death has produced a painful impression in the minds of a large circle of friends. His remains were accompanied to their place of internment, in the Episcopal-burying ground, on Sabbath afternoon, by a great concourse of people. The burial service was performed by Rev. Mr. Dickson.

Newspaper ad for fancy work
21 May 1862, page 3

28 May 1862, page 2

New Election in Oshawa
On Friday next, at 10 o’clock in the forenoon, a meeting of the Electors of Oshawa is to be held at the Court House for the Purpose of electing a Village Councillor in place of Mr. W. W. Brown, who has resigned. It is to be well represented at the meeting, and that a wise choice will be made.

Base Ball Club
At a meeting held in Woon’s Hotel, on Wednesday evening, the 14th inst., by a number of the young men of this place, a Club was organized entitled the Morning Star Base Ball Club of Oshawa, and the following members were elected as Officers for the present season, viz: Edward Morris, President; Thomas W. Gibbs, Vice Pres.; Wm. Ogston Hay, Secretary. Committee of Management: T.G. Webster, Walter Spender, James Stephens, T.W. Gibbs.

The above Club meets, for play, every morning at 5 ½ o’clock, on Conant’s field. Persons wishing to become members of the same, can hand in their names to the Secretary.

Two newspaper ads for wool
28 May 1862, page 3
%d bloggers like this: