The Month That Was – August 1902

Ontario Reformer
Bullets in Their Brain
Edition 01 August 1902

PEOPLE WHO CARRY THEM AND FEEL NO ILL EFFECTS
Many Strange Things Found in the Brain – Some Curious Cases

The idea that the human brain is an organ so extremely delicate in its structure that it cannot bear the slightest physical hurt sometimes appears to receive a contradiction in the experience of people who have been met with peculiar injuries to the head. The history of brain surgery presents some remarkable facts in regard to the extent to which the thinking organ will sometimes resist the effects of external injury. It has been shown that in some cases quantities of its substance may be removed without appreciably diminishing the normal intelligence of the patient; while some have been known to carry the most extraordinary foreign substance embedded in their skulls for years.

Finds of the most singular kind have been made in the interior substances of the living human brain. The strangest things have been known to find entry there through accident or design. In one case it was the blade of a penknife that was carried about in the brain for half a lifetime without the patient being in the least aware of it: in another it was a penholder that had somehow found its way there and remained in its living hiding-place without apparently interfering with the thinking power of the organ: while only a week or so ago a piece of slate pencil was recovered from a boy’s brain after it had been hidden there for several years.

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Ontario Reformer
The McLaughlin Carriage Co.’s Employes [SIC] Excursion
Edition 22 August 1902

Saturday morning last the sun rose upon a cloudless sky, for the weather clerk had notice that on that day the employees of the McLaughlin Carriage Company were to run their excursion to Orillia. A special train had been chartered for the occasion and the extremely low rate of $1.95 was secured for the excursionists. Long before the hour set for departure the street corners along Simcoe and King streets were crowded with people waiting for cars to carry them to the station. About eight o’clock the train of eleven coaches drawn by two engines, started from Oshawa. The train was tastily decorated for the occasion by the Committes [SIC]. The service rendered by the railway was highly satisfactory, for the run was made in about three hours and a half, which was passed by the excursionists in pleasant conversation and in viewing the varied scenery of river, lake, hill, and harvest.

The Oshawa Citizen’s Band was in attendance to furnish music for the day and the baseball and lacrosse teams went along to play games.

When Orillia was reached part of people got off the train and formed a procession, headed by the band, which proceeded to the park, while the train carried the remainder direct to the Park. Here dinner was partaken of by those who had carried their blankets, the rest going to the hotels. In the afternoon a baseball game was played between the Oshawa team and a team from the employees of the Tudhope Carriage Co., of Orillia. The Oshawa players were to fast for Orillia and succeeded in scoring 22 runs to Orillia’s 6.  There was no programme of games as the lacrosse game on the oval called for 3 o’clock. Those who did not attend the lacrosse game spent the balance of the afternoon taking in the town or quietly resting in the park, which is beautifully situated on the shore of Lake Couchiching … The whole day was pleasantly spent by employer and employee and showed the harmony that exists in this great Oshawa industry. The return journey was commenced about 7 o’clock and by 11 o’clock all were safely at home save for a few who remained over Sunday. The Committee of Management carried out the whole program successfully and it is due to their untiring efforts that the 700 people who went to Orillia enjoyed as ideal holiday…

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Ontario Reformer
Oshawa-On-The-Lake
Edition 01 August 1902

A very severe thunderstorm, accompanied by rain and lightning stuck this camp on Saturday afternoon and raised great havoc. The large dining tent was blown down and the centre poles broken. The headquarters tent was also blown down and part of the contents of the canteen destroyed. One of the small tents was broken down and most of the bedding in the others was very wet afterwards. The occupants of the other tents, had to hang on to their tents for about half an hour or all would have been blown down. On Sunday afternoon another sudden storm came up, but as the officers had timely warning very little damage was done, excepting in the cook house where a large amount of bread was destroyed, almost depriving the boys of their next morning’s breakfast; no order could be got uptown, as the telephone lines were destroyed. However, the younger boys did not suffer any as Mr. Carey kindly offered them shelter in his barn, which was gratefully accepted. However, the younger boys did not suffer any as Mr. Carey kindly offered them shelter in his barn, which was gratefully accepted.

 

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Ontario Reformer
Excursion to Toronto
Edition 01 August 1902

Durham Old Boy’s Association of Toronto has invited all former and present residents of Durham County to be their guests in Yoronto [SIC], on Monday next, as a grand reunion picnic to e held on the beautiful grounds of Dr. John Hoskin, K.C. The Dale, Howard Street of Bloor. A free dinner will be served at12 o’clock, and a splendid program will follow. Cheap rates have been obtained on the Grand Trunk Railway, going by local train only, and returning by any train same day as follows: –

Darlington –   7:00 a.m.                  $1.25
Oshawa et. –  8:00 “                        $1.10
Whitby –         8:00 “                           $ 1.10
Pickering –      8:00 “                          $1.10

 

Ontario Reformer
Kawartha Lakes
Edition 01 August 1902

A Place to Spend a Happy Holiday

Before deciding on a place at which to spend the vacation this summer, it is well to take into consideration the many advantages of the Kawartha Lakes region of Ontario, Canada. As a place for camping the region has no superior. For the most part, the shores of the lakes are untouched by man. Nature is seen in all her grand disorder, there being nowhere that artificially, which to the true lover of nature, often spoils landscape. Pure air and water, each of which in a factor in choosing a summering place are assured in that region. Transportation on the lakes is also amply provided by a steamboat line plying between Lakefield and Coboconk, a distance of 70 miles. There is an additional attraction for the angler, as the fishing in the lakes is very good. The gamey [muskellunge] and black basses are here to reward the sportsman.

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Ontario Reformer
Canadian Prosperity
Edition 01 August, 1902

Canada’s prosperity, at present, is unprecedented. The trade returns for the final year ending June 30th, 1902, exceeded four hundred million dollars – the exact figures being $414, 517, 368, while those of last year were $377, 689, 653, being an increase of $36, 826, 653 or 72 per cent over and above the trade of 1893, which was the last year during the life of the late government.

……..

In proportion to population, the trade of Canada is not considerable more than double the relative volume of trade of the United States. In 1901 the latter, with its seventy millions of people, had a total volume of exports and imports aggregating $2, 301, 937, 156, which proportionately, is not on half of Canada’s trade last year.

This is not due to any epidemic growth in any one line of progress, but the progress along all the avenues of trade. The agricultural increase last year was very remarkable, and the exports exceeded those of the year previous more than 50 per cent. Nor did the manufacturers’ exports fall off, but were ahead of the times in every [way].

 

Ontario Reformer
Ontario Malleable Iron Co. Employees Annual Picnic
Edition 01 August 1902

The employees of the Ontario Malleable Iron Co., with their families and friends, held their annual picnic at Oshawa-on-the-Lake last Saturday. The affair was a success and a day of delight to all who took part in it. When all had assembled the number was computed at between two and three thousand. The event was highly creditable to all concerned, evincing thorough and hearty harmony between employers and employees. The large crowd were accommodated to the utmost by the Street Railway Co. and Mr. Arthur Henry. An excellent program of sports and attractions was provided for the entertainments of all present. The weather, in the morning and afternoon was fine and warm, but towards evening a severe thunder and rain storm was disappointing to many who were just at supper the lawns.

The music furnished by the Oshawa Citizen’s Band afforded delight to listeners on the grounds in the afternoon, and during the evening in the pavilion where dancing was pleasantly indulged in.

Student Museum Musings – Durham LIT Students

Their semester has wrapped up, but before they were finished, two students from the Durham College Library & Information Technician program shared their experiences as interns at the Oshawa Museum.  Here’s what they had to say.

Jenn

As part of the final year at Durham College’s Library and Information Technician program, I am at the Oshawa Museum completing field placement hours. I have had the opportunity to work on the museum’s newest publication – The Annotated Memoirs of Rev. Thomas Henry. I got thrown onto this project as a sort of “happy accident:”  I was originally slated to be working in the archive, but help was needed elsewhere.

The book is being annotated by Laura Suchan, Executive Director of the Oshawa Museum, and Stoney Kudel, president of the Oshawa Historical Society. I have been designing the overall layout of the book.

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A973.13.1 – Elder Thomas Henry

As an out-of-town student, working on this book has been my introduction to the history of Oshawa and the Henry family. I can’t begin to say how much research has gone into this publication. On my part, it was mostly because I was unfamiliar with a lot of the stories that I was reading about, and I wanted to relate what was happening in Oshawa (then East Whitby Township) to what I knew about the history of Ontario and Canada as a whole.

The museum is fortunate enough to have a lot of the Henry family’s history. I’ve had the opportunity to search through letters, early censuses and photographs, all in the sake of finding information for this book. I’ve enjoyed learning the different histories – being told to sit down and do research has been a dream these past few months.

Unfortunately, with the semester ending, I am finished my internship at the museum, and as of now, the book is not yet complete, though it should be soon. I look forward to seeing how all the work we’ve done comes together in print.


Amanda

I’m a firm believer in what we learn from our past will guide us in the future so history has always been a huge interest of mine. Learning about how an archive and museum are run in class was fun, but actually getting to come into the archives and be able to see and touch history with my own two hands was another experience all together. From my time at the archives I was able to see the real behind the scenes of how an archives is run and operated daily. Through the task I was assigned I got to see what it was like to actually go through a donation and learned the value of recording everything. I also got a chance to see just how much time one project can take. From going through the newspapers, clipping, photocopying, and encasing them it took around 19 hours. With how little staff and money is usually given to archives you can see how much one person needs to do.

I’m very grateful for the experience! and now when I go to museums/archives I will truly know the value of them, not just from a preserving history stance.


Thank you to Jenn and Amanda for sharing their stories!

Want to know more about our Winter Semester post-secondary students? Jenn, Peter, Sarah, and Elora introduced themselves in an earlier post!

Archives Awareness Week: 1867/1967

By Jennifer Weymark, Archivist

This article originally appeared on the Durham Region Area Archives Group website to celebrate Archives Awareness Week. This annual event, held across Ontario from April 3-9, 2017, is designed to raise awareness of the many resources that can be found in archival collections around the province.


This year marks the 150th Anniversary of Confederation. The year will be filled with celebrations, retrospection and imagining where this country will be in another 150 years. To begin the celebration, member institutions of DRAAG have looked through their holdings to find the most interesting item from 1867 and 1967 in their collections!

On August 26, 1867 an Oshawa resident by the name of T.N. Gibbs received a telegram from John A. Macdonald.  The telegram is rather significant, not only because it was sent by Canada’s first Prime Minister, but it talks about the first election after Confederation.

Gibbs was not new to politics but this election would be his most notable. He ran against Reformer backed George Brown and Liberal John Sandfield Macdonald.  While Gibbs won, it was widely accepted that he do so by corrupt practices.

Gibbs was the only successful Conservative candidate in this area.  This meant that he acted as the local confidante for Sir John A. Macdonald. So much so, that we have another little note sent to Gibbs by Macdonald in our collection.

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A960.19.5 (60-D-19); from the archival collection of the Oshawa Museum

Canada celebrated the 100th Anniversary of Confederation on a large scale. Locally, Oshawa joined in on the celebrations as well. Between beard growing contests, NHL exhibition games and special performances, the City marked the anniversary in a prominent way. Students in Oshawa schools spent a good part of the school year preparing for a Centennial Celebration held at the Civic Auditorium. The program included songs and dances, art work and projects that highlighted the differences between life in Oshawa in 1867 and 1967. The grade 7 and 8 students from E.A. Lovell School actually put on a performance showing the differences in physical training in 1867 and 1967. In the archives, we have the binder that was developed to outline all of the activities Oshawa schools engaged in related to the Centennial.

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Be sure to visit the Durham Region Area Archives Group website to see what gems are in archives from around our Region and to learn more about local archives!

Month That Was: April 1947

All news articles have come from the The Daily Times-Gazette

Tuesday April 1, 1947
Ayrshire Breeder In District Make First Shipment to China
First U.N.R.R.A. shipment of its kind from Canada, 12 head of topflight Ayrshire cattle, are rolling west by rail from here today on the first lap of the long haul to China.

Hermitage Farms, Pickering, owned by E. L. Ruddy and Son, was the key assembly point yesterday afternoon as the thoroughbred livestock where herded up the ramps into trucks in preparation for two-month trip. Three thousand miles away, a China-bound ship is waiting in Vancouver harbour for the Ontario shipment.

Arranged by the Dominion Department of Agriculture, this transfer of livestock to U.N.R.R.A. for relief of China’s decimated herds will be followed by further deliverers from other Ontario centres.

In addition to seven bulls and two heifers bred at Hermitage Farms, yesterday’s included one bull from Albert Cooper’s Netherhall Farms, Brooklin, one bull from F. G. Carswell’s farm, Brooklin, and one heifer from Cluaran Farms, owned by Charles Robson, of Oshawa.

“It’s the first sale of cattle to U.N.R.R.A. from Canada,” said Robert Ruddy, waiting for the trucks to arrive. “I think the last shipment to China like this was 14 years ago,” he added.

U.N.R.R.A. specifications were “very high”, Mr. Ruddy explained. Bulls had to be between 12 and 14 months of age and cows had to have a butter production record of 500 pounds per year running as far back as the granddam.

Mr. Ruddy said the livestock would be used for breeding purposes in China, where every phase of the economy has been riddled by ravages of invasion and civil war.

Nearly 300 applications had flooded in to U.N.R.R.A. headquarters when the agency called for men to accompany the Ontario shipment all the way to China. No one from the district had been chosen as far as Mr. Ruddy knew.

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The first shipment of its kind from this area, a shipment of 12 thoroughbred Ayrshire cattle from Hermitage Farms, Pickering; Netherhall Farms, Brooklin; F. G. Carswell’s Glen Carswell farm at Columbus and Cluaran Farms, Oshawa, is rolling toward the west coast today on the first lap of its journey to China. The shipment which was arranged for U.N.R.R.A. by the Dominion Department of Agriculture, was assembled at Hermitage Farms and loaded yesterday. The nine bulls in the shipment, left to right are: Glen Carswell Peter Pan, from the Glen Carswell Farm; Hermitage Double Burton, Hermitage Lustre General, Wallabrae Buster Earl, Hermitage Royal Charlie, all from Hermitage Farms; Brooklin Danny Boy, from Netherhall Farms; Hermitage Coronation Master, Hermitage Lord Douglas 3rd and Hermitage Lucky Noble Art, from Hermitage farms. -Photo by Campbell’s Studio

 

April. 8, 1947
AUTHORIZE CEDARDALE PLAYGROUND
Cedardale is to have its long awaited playground.

On motion of the city council last night, authorization was given to the east portion of the former Coulter property being used as a playground so long as it is not required by the city for any other purpose. Authorization was also given for the Board of Works to do the necessary grading.

The property, now owned by the city, is the site of the former Coulter Manufacturing plant and runs from Simcoe Street to Ritson Road south of the Skinner Co. plant. The portion for the proposed playground is that nearest Ritson Road.

Pointing to the need for a playground in this area, Recreation Director R.L. Coleman said it was hoped it could be put into use this summer. The site, he said, is large enough to be useful of all types of activities including sports and outings for the large industries in the area.

Mr. Coleman said the property would accommodate a hard ball diamond, there being no other diamond of this kind south of King Street. He outlined the south-east corner as the part of the new park most suitable for the children’s play area.

Tried to Pick Fight with Police
George R. Kirtley, East Whitby, was fined $5 and costs or five days, on a charge of disorderly conduct, to which he pleaded guilty in Magistrate’s Court this morning. It was pointed out that the accused had no previous record.

Constable Harvey testified he and constable Harry King were trying to stop an argument between several fellows in front of the Woolworth Building on King Street West, about 1:25 a.m. Sunday when the accused came out of the New Service Lunch and intervened.

“The accused tried to pick a fight with us when we were busy breaking up the other argument,” the officer said.

Kirtley in his own defence started that he had been drinking, but not to excess that night. He was only striking up for his friends and not trying to pick a fight with anybody.

CANCER CASES ON INCREASE V.O.N SAYS
Statistics produced by the supervisor of the Victorian Order of Nurses, Miss Edith Hill, at a regular monthly meeting on the V.O.N. executive here yesterday afternoon, show there is a vast increase in the number of cases if cancer and pneumonia in this city. Cancer in the city has risen to five cases as compared to one last year at this time.

During February, the nurse’s report said, a total of 70 admissions were made; visitations were 432; and fees received were $153.50. During March this year there were 75 admissions; visitors 468 and fees amounting to $176.50.

Miss Downey, a graduate of the public health nursing course at the University of Toronto, is taking her practical training with Miss Hill at the present time.

At yesterday’s meeting Alderman Clifford Harmon was appointed council representative on the Victorian Order of Nurses executive board here.

It was also resolved that W.E.N. Sinclair, K.C., M.P., be asked to represent the local V.O.N. branch at the 49th annual meeting of the Board of Govenors of the V.O.N. of Canada to be held in Ottawa, April 29 and 30.

 

April. 15, 1947
Quick Action Saves Child From Water
The quick action of Mrs. Harry King, Ritson Road North, saved three-year-old Marie Taylor from possible drowning this morning when the child fell into a cellar for a new house which contained two or three feet of water.

Mrs. King, who resided on the east side of Ritson Road North, two houses Rosedale Avenue, noticed an object in the water in the cellar which is just north of her house. Going out she found a little girl in the water and without delay went into the water and rescued her.

Marie, who lives in Toronto and was visiting her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. O’Donnell, 334 Ritson Road North, is now none the worse for her experience.

Neighbors said this was not the first time children had fallen into the water in the cellar.

Good Nickel Chocolate Bar Needed
By The Canadian Press
What Canadians want is a good five-cent chocolate bar, a Canadian Press survey showed today.

Most citizens questioned agreed with C.C.F. leader M.J. Coldwell who pleaded in the House of Commons yesterday for a return to the five-cent bar. He raised the question in commenting on the recent price increase which hiked the wartime six-cent bar to eight-cents.

The survey showed that while the average Canadian kid will go for his chocolate bar regardless of price, his more money conscious dad is beginning to smit loud squawks of protest. In some localities the price boost led to increased supplies while others noted no change in a candyless situation.

One curious feature was a wide divergence in reports of sales, Toronto reporting a 50 per cent drop in sales volume and other cities, notably Winnipeg, reporting sales of all supplies available. Some points said it was too early to note any difference in the week since the increase went into effect.

Montreal reported there was a slight dropping off in sales but most adults were buying all in sight. Dealers anticipated a further decline in sales as supplies increased. Ottawa confectioners looked to an easing in the supply situation while they reported customers were getting more “choosy” at the higher price and inclined to take only what they considered the better bars.

Toronto dealers took an optimistic view and said that when customers got used to the idea of the eight-cent bar they’d start buying again.

In the West, while complaints were frequent and there was some decrease in sales, dealers generally reported selling all they had on hand.

April. 22, 1947:
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April. 29, 1947
City Buys Snowloader
Purchase of a snowloader for the city was authorized last night by the City Council while tenders for a caterpillar tractor to be used in connection with the proposed sanitary land fill system of garbage disposal was referred to the city engineer for his recommendation.

The snowloader, complete with overhead loader and bulldozer blade, will be purchased from the General Supply Co. of Canada for $4,663.

Tenders from four firms were received for the tractor and after the city clerk had read the lengthy technical descriptions embodied in these it was moved the City Engineer W. Dempsey study them and bring a recommendation as to the most satisfactory. The price ranged from $6,020 to $7,270.

 

Meet the Museum: Jennifer Weymark, Archivist

The focus of this blog series is the staff of the Oshawa Museum and their role at the site.  What does it mean to the archivist or curator at a community museum?  What goes on behind the scenes in the Programming office?  What is our Executive Director’s favourite memory of the Museum? 

Join us and see what happens behind the doors of Guy House.

What do you do at the Oshawa Museum?

I am the Archivist which means that I manage the archival collection.  The archival collection is made up of historical documents or records related to the history of Oshawa. Within the collection, we have photographs, maps, oral histories, newspapers, land deeds, diaries, personal correspondence and so much more.

It is my job to ensure that this information is preserved and made available to those interested in researching.

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Why did you choose this career?

I was in third year university when I took a course on public history.  This course opened my eyes to the many different ways a degree in history could be used.  The whole first half of the course focused on the history and role of museums and I was hooked.  From that point on, I shifted my focus from becoming a teacher to working towards a career in the museum field.

 

What is your favourite part of your job?

The fact that each day comes with the possibility of some new discovery.  Whether that be stumbling upon an obituary that helps us to better understand someone or reading through a handwritten letter that changes the way we look at our history, there is always the potential to discover something new each day.

 

What do you find to be the most challenging part of your job?

From a research perspective, I do find the lack of early Oshawa newspapers to be rather challenging. There are large gaps in Oshawa’s newspaper record due to a fire that wiped out so many prior to having them microfilmed.  There is a gap between 1873 and 1922 and once again during the period of the Second World War.   Newspapers provide such a great snapshot of life at a very specific time and it very challenging that so many of Oshawa’s early ones have been lost.  It is for this reason that we recently had several of our hardcopy newspapers from these missing times digitized.

You can view many of Oshawa’s early newspapers on the Canadian Community Digital Archives website.

 

How did you get into the museum field?

Honestly, I was in the right place at the right time.  I had just finished my internship at the Canadian War Museum and had graduated from the Museum Management and Curatorship course from Sir Sandford Fleming when a job was posted for Tour Guide at the Oshawa Community Museum.  I was hired here in September 1999 and worked hard in that position until the following September when the position of Archivist became available.  Collections management had been the area of museum work that I truly loved and I was over the moon when I was hired as Archivist.

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What is your favourite memory of the Museum?

My favourite memory of the Museum is the reopening of Guy House after the fire.  That was such a challenging time but we persevered and continued to focus on ensuring that we advocated for the importance of heritage in Oshawa.