The Month That Was – June 1944

The Times-Gazette, 01 June 1944
Corvette Crew Is Welcomed

Gifts Presented At Civic Ceremony Monday At Peterborough

Peterborough, May 30 – “A sailor’s life is one of great hazard and whatever the fortunes of war may carry you, our thoughts and supplications will be with you. We hope that when the war ends you will come back to visit us, and meantime we will do all we can to help you,” said Mayor Hamilton, addressing the ship’s company of H.M.O.S. Peterborough at the welcoming ceremonies help in Riverside Bowl Monday evening.

There were six officers and 54 ratings of a crew that will eventually comprise upwards of 95 men present at the ceremony.

George McDonald, chairman of the Corvette committee, presented a box, of the same kind that every member of the ships company will receive, to one of the ratings called to the platform for the occasion, a sort of symbolic transfer of the equipment garnered by the committee to the men for whom it is intended. While many youngsters milled around the makeshift stand determined to be in on the unwrapping of the package, the sailor, a leading telegraphist from Verdun Que., proceeded to undo a large box of comforts which included face cloths, handkerchiefs, shaving soap, razor blades, toothpaste and toothbrush, comb, nail file, chewing gum, chocolate bars, tins of soup and still other gifts even unto woolen articles. While the sailor tried on a leather jacket, Mr. MacDonald commented humorously, “If it’s too large, he’ll wear it.” In a moment, however, he was able to announce with satisfaction, that the jacket did fit.

Ad for the Oshawa Rotary Fair
Canadian Statesman, 1 Jun 1944, p. 5

The Globe and Mail, 05 June 1944, 23.
Oshawa Public Schools

Require for Sept 5th, qualified lady assistants for grade positions. Must have at least 2 years experience. Initial salary according to qualifications and experience. Applications giving full particulars of qualifications and experience will be received up to and including Sat., June 10, 1944. No personal applications unless requested. W. Gordon Bunker. Business Administrator. Board of Education. Oshawa.

Black and White ad for War Work - Men and Women, Youths and Girls
Canadian Statesman, 1 Jun 1944, p. 5

Toronto Daily Star, 07 June 1944, 3.
Record RCAF Raid Helps Clear Path for Invaders

London, June 7 – (CP) – In a quick follow up to the great invasion-eve assault on the French coast, the RCAF bomber group set a record last night during its participation with the RAF in the attack on coastal defences.

Some 5,000 tons of bombs were dropped by the RAF and RCAF heavy bombers and at least 1,000 tons were dropped by the Canadians. Targets were roads, railways and bridges back of the beachheads, destruction of which would delay German reinforcements. …

The City of Oshawa squadron was the first back from the beaches in the morning. Group Capt. MacBrien led the first three Canadian squadrons, accompanied by Wing Cmdr. Lloyd Chadburn, of Aurora, Ldr. RA Buckham, of Vancouver, and Sqdn Ldr. Walter Conrad, of Richmond, Ont.

Toronto Daily Star, 7 Jun 1944, 8.
Robert beats, chokes him jeweler unconscious hour

Oshawa, June 7th- city and provincial police maintained a sharp watch over highways, rail and bus terminals last night and today for a man said to have been wearing the uniform of the US ferry command, who entered the jewelry store of Fritz von Gunten, 66. After beating and choking the proprietor the wanted man robbed the store of an undetermined amount of jewelry, police said.

Von Gunten is an awkward is in Oshawa General Hospital with cuts on his head and left hand and bruises about his throat and body. Police said he had been beaten over the head with a blunt instrument. Hospital officials said his condition was “improving.”

Inspector Wilbur Dawn of the Oshawa police said it would be impossible to assess the amount of jewelry stolen until the proprietor recovered sufficiently to check over his stock.

“We found Mr von Gunten lying in a pool of blood on the floor of his store.” Inspector Dawn stated. “His groans attracted the attention of the men in the lunch counter next door and they gave the alarm.”

James Edgar, who was painting the interior of the lunch counter, said: “ I heard an awful yell and came down from my ladder and looked into the Chinese laundry next door, but didn’t see anything.” Police said von Gunten was so badly beaten that he lay unconscious for over an hour before recovering sufficiently to call for help.

The jeweler told the police he had no warning of the assault. “The man came right in and struck me over the head and beat me before looting the showcases of rings and watches” he said.

*Note: This news event was also reported on by the Globe & Mail. They provided additional details such as the address to the store (125 King St.), and that the wanted man was seen boarding a TTC Bus for Toronto. It was Dr. FJ Rundle who gave details about the state of Mr. Von Gunten.

Black and White ad for movie times at Oshawa's Regent Theatre
Canadian Statesman, 8 Jun 1944, p. 3

The Times Gazette, 17 June, 1944
Freedom Our Birthright

Tomorrow Oshawa will celebrate the 729th anniversary of the signing of what has frequently been called, “the first Act of Parliament.” It was on June 15th, 1215, that King John, one of England’s worst kings, unwillingly signed the 48 articles of a document that during the ensuing few days was still further documented into 63 chapters of the Magna Charta. There remain now by four signed copies of the charter, but they are jealously guarded as something of priceless sentiment.

Apart from the peculiar circumstances of its origin this charter has been regarded through the years that followed its dramatic signing in the meadows of Runnymede, as a charter of wellnigh sacred principles. This is not to be wondered at, for it embodies the highest ideals of English liberty. We use the word ‘English’ advisedly for it was in England that this enunciation of the principles of the rights of free men was so harshly wrested from an unscrupulous, despotic monarch. On the clauses of its various chapters, our modern laws are based. Many additional laws have since been contributed to our wellbeing; but Magna Charts remains the standard towards which all British subjects, wherever domiciled, may look if they desire, as is their due, to draw themselves up and say, “I am free born.”

We must hold fast to this our heritage. During the stress of war we have willingly though temporarily, yielded some of our hard won freedom. But when peace returns, we must make sure that these are restored. For example, let us make sure that no one can ever delay, or deny justice to our citizens. Let us do our part also to ensure that the Four Freedoms of the Atlantic Charter of 1940 based in great measure on the Magna Charta, are not just pious hopes and eloquent phrases. The path of our forefathers since 1215 has been rough and rugged. Perfection lies still far beyond our vision. It is well that we celebrate anniversaries such as this – lest we forget. Human nature being what it is, unfortunately, we forget too soon. 

The Globe and Mail, Jun 21, 1944, 4.
Lloyd Chadburn dies of collision injuries
By Allan Nickleson

London, June 20th (CP).- Wing Commander Lloyd B Chadburn, a fighter ace who ranked with Canada’s greatest airman, was injured fatally a week ago in a collision while leading his wing on operations over France.

His plane exploded on impact with another aircraft which crashed in flames and a subsequent RCAF announcement said that the 24 year old Aurora, Ont., pilot, holder of a double DSO and the DFC, “died later of his injuries.”

The tall, quietly spoken Chadburn had a record of 14 enemy aircraft destroyed, three probably destroyed and eight damaged but you never would learn that from this ace who rose from the ranks. …

Chadburn’s first squadron was adopted by the city of Oshawa, which name it now bears. That squadron had the best Canadian record at Dieppe where Chadburn shot down one of the four aircraft the squadron destroyed without last to itself.

Black and White ad for Coca-Cola and Hambly's Beverages, using the imagery of a soldier and two young boys
Canadian Statesman, 29 Jun 1944, p. 5

Canadian Statesman, 22 Jun 1944, 1.
Dept. of Highways Post-War Program a Four-Year Plan

In the Ontario Department of Highways’ post-war program a four-year plan is being laid down by Minister George H. Doucett, calling for a total expenditure of $180,000,000 at $45,000,000 a year. Employment is expected to be given over the four years to at least 25,000 men.

It includes extensions to the existing Queen Elizabeth Way, east from Oshawa, ultimately to the Quebec boundary.

Work is now progressing east of Oshawa to Newcastle and plans are prepared to reroute the construction to fit in with the development of the St. Lawrence in Eastern Ontario…

The Month That Was – April 1871

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Vindicator

5 April 1871, page 2

The House of Commons have virtually passed the bill admitting British Columbia into the Confederation. She is to enter with three members in the Senate and six in the commons. The financial arrangement, however, are the important part of the agreement. By these terms it is proposed to allow British Columbia an annual allowance of $35,000; And eighty cents per head of the population until it reaches the maximum of 400,000; an ask the debt of the provinces small, interest will be allowed upon the difference between its actual debt and the proportional indebtedness of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick…. The dominion binds herself to secure the construction of a railway to the Pacific within 10 years; And the province hands over to the dominion about 16 million acres of land, for which she, in turn, will receive $100,000 a year in half yearly installments to be paid in advance. Then it is proposed to guarantee the interest for ten years, at 5% per annum, dating from the completion of the works on a sum not to exceed 100,000 pounds sterling for the construction of a first class graving dock at Esquimault. The railway is not to be constructed by the government, but by companies, who will receive land grants and a cash bonus amounting to about 10 millions. the government have guaranteed that its construction shall not increase the taxation of the country, and are to add a rider to the bill expressive of the manner in which the road is to be built. Without the road the mere Confederation would be a farce. If the construction of the intercolonial is justifiable, the construction of the Pacific is 10 times more so, for it opens up not only a country, but almost a continent to settlement.

5 April 1871, p1

12 April 1871, page 2

The roads this spring have not been as bad at least, but they have been in many places almost impossible. The reach road between Oshawa and Prince Albert, has been very bad in a few places and requires a considerable outlay. We are glad to know that the council of East Whitby intend an outlay of something like $1500 including the county grant upon it. This will make the portion within the limits of the Township very fair. A rich Township like this ought to have every concession line gravelled. The outly would be amply repaid in a year or two by the saving of time, waggons and horseflesh. The council of the Township has paid great attention to this subject, and we hope that as before the ratepayers will approve and support their enlightened policy, even should they be more liberal than of old.

The constable has issued his edict against cattle running at large, and the boys are ready to carry it into effect by impounding all stray livestock.

Stealing horses from the hotel sheds seems to have become an institution here. On Monday evening about half-past six, Mr. W. May drove his horse and wagon into Hines’ shed. At half-past eight he entered the shed and found his property gone. It has probably been taken northward. A full description will be found in our advertising columns.

$25 Reward
The above reward will be paid for the recovery or information leading to the recovery of my mare, light waggon, buffalo robe, and harness, stolen from the shed of Hines’ Hotel, Oshawa, last evening; and the apprehension of the thief. The mare is a light bay, nearly cream color, with dark mane and tail. She is five years old, and interferes in her hind legs. The waggon is a spring democrat, with name of maker (Lavis) on tail board.
WM May
Oshawa, April 11, 1871

newspaper advertisement for good for sale
12 April 1871 page 3

19 April 1871, page 2

Sometime last week the barns of Mr. Petrie, on the base line, and Mr. Phillips, Cedar Dale, were entered. From the former, 10 or 12 bushels of oats and some poultry, and from the latter, a bag of clover seed, were stolen. The farmers of East Whitby will yet have to form a vigilance club to bring to justice these burn robbers. Probably all the thieving is done by one or two residents, and a proper watch on any suspicious characters would put an end to their depredations.

That portion of Moore’s Hill, in the road between Oshawa and Whitby, belonging to West Whitby is in very bad condition. One or two places require to be cross trained an additional gravel placed upon it. We hope the townships will keep up the good work begun buy them on this hill. A road with so much travel ought to be made one of the best, instead of one of the worst roads in the country. If the four municipalities interested would enter into some concerted plan this could be done at no great expense. Great improvements have been made during the last two or three years, but there is much that remains to be done. Let the councils try the union plan. A committee from each council could meet in Whitby or Oshawa and unite upon a scheme to be adopted by their respective councils. The same committee might have power to revive the Union Burial Ground question and suggest a plan for carrying out the two long neglected idea of making a cemetery worthy of the municipalities’ interested.

The horse and waggon belonging to Mr. Wm. May stolen from Hines’ shed on Monday evening last was returned on Wednesday. The horse was found next morning in the shed of Taylor’s tavern, Raglan. The advertisement inserted in the vindicator by Mr. May, identified the property on Wednesday, and the property was at once returned to the owner. Whether it was actually stolen and the thief became afraid, or whether some reckless scoundrel took it to obtain a ride to Raglan is not known. It has been taken from the shed as the altered condition of the harness testified. We regret there is no clue to the thief.

Newspaper advertisement for tailoring
19 April 1871 page 2

26 April 1871, page 2

The street in front of Hines’ hotel, was the scene of a most disgraceful breach of the peace on Saturday evening. It appears that a feud has existed between a number of disorderly characters in Oshawa, known as the Herring Gang, and a number of similar characters residing to the east of the town. The consequences is, that if one of them falls under after dark among his opponents, he receives a sound beating. On Saturday night, both sides mustered in force to fight it out. Constable Gurley having received notice appeared on the scene and with some aid of peaceable citizens broke up the intended fight, for which however, the belligerence appeared to have no great stomach. The Oshawa rowdies afterward marched up and down street shouting until midnight. On Monday, warrants were issued for Thos. Law, Jas. Dovey, Michael Caulfield, W. O’Driscoll, Richard Richens, Geo. Wilson, farmer, Willard Vanderhodd and J. Bladwin, who were charged with being present and aiding and abetting in the row. O’Driscoll, Wilson and Baldwin, put in an appearance before the magistrate, WH Gibbs, Esq., yesterday. The case against Wilson broke down, and he was discharged. O’Driscoll denied a longing to the Herring Gang, but was fined $2 for not leaving the crowd when ordered to by Constable Gurley, and afterwards parading the streets with the gang. Baldwin was charged with inciting the parties to fight. He was fined $5 for his share in the riot. Baldwin appears not to be a member of the gang. Of those who did not appear, Richens was fined $2 and the others $5 each. The Herring Gang are so called from wearing a fish shaped badge on their breast. They are regularly organized and some of them carry firearms and loaded bludgeons. The village authorities are determined to break them up, and anyone arrested with a weapon will at once be committed for trial. It is absolutely necessary for the peace and safety of the town that this organization shall be destroyed. Already a counter organization is said to be forming and a nice lot of faction brawls will follow.

newspaper advertisement for furniture and undertaking business
26 April 1871 page 4

The Month That Was – February 1928

Whitby Gazette and Primer, February 9, 1928, page 1
Lad Who Tampered With Mail Given Warning

A boy ten years of age appeared before His Worship Magistrate Willis in police escort Monday afternoon charged with the rather serious offence of tampering with mail boxes in the post office and taking mail therefrom. The boy stated that a companion of his dared him to take out the glass of a certain box in the post office and that he did so with a nail. Evidence showed that this had been going on for some time, and that mail, including a man’s salary cheque, had been taken and destroyed.

Whitby Gazette, Feb 9 1928, p3.

Page 3
Long Distance

“I must call John by Long Distance and let him know I got here all right. Then neither of us will be worrying. It’s wonderful to be able to visit you like this, and yet keep as close touch with home as if I were there. What must it have been like in the old days, before Long Distance made it possible?”

“I’ll place this call for you while you are taking off your wraps”

“That will be fine. Just ask for our number, 124,  so I’ll get the cheaper Station-to-Station rate. In a couple of days I’ll call up again, in the evening, so I can have a few words with the children, too. The Evening Rate after 8.30 is really very low.”

Whitby Gazette, Feb 9 1928.

Page 5
Fire Destroys Barn

Fire of unknown origin, which caused almost the total destruction of a large barn owned by Mr. Edward Bradley and adjoining his house on Brock Street South, broke out about nine o’clock Saturday evening, and before the blaze was extinguished the building was completely gutted. Two cows, some hens and a cat were brought to safety but a quantity of hay in the loft where the fire apparently started, was destroyed. After notification the firemen made a quick response but considerable water pressure was lost when one line of hose laid from Brock Street burst. Mr. and Mrs. Bradley were out when the fire was discovered by neighbours who gave the alarm.

Whitby Gazette, Feb 9 1928, p4.

The Oshawa Daily Times, February 14,1928, Page 1
Missing Oshawa Boys           

Jimmie Webster, missing from his home, 737 Cedar Street, since Friday noon, is in Detroit, and it has been almost definitely established that Clement Innis, 126 Alice Street, went to that city also. Word was received by Webster’s parents this morning by a post card that he was safe in Detroit. He did not volunteer much more information, but said he would write at greater length later. He did not mention Innis in his card. Police have practically definitely traced a part with two boys answering the description of these youths to Windsor, so it is believed that the two went together to the American city across the river.

Page 3
Church Site

Definite purchase was completed this morning of two lots on Mary and Hillcroft Streets on which the new Christ Church will be built by the local Anglican parish. It is on this property that the proposed $75,000 church will be erected. The new church site has 83 feet frontage on Hillcroft Street by a depth of about 130 feet on Mary Street. The lots were purchased through G. W. Rose of Rose Real Estate, Simcoe Street North, for the Anglican church, the total purchase price being $2,300.

Page 5
Spot of Fashion

The polka dotted gown has created a furore in the smart fashion centres. Polka dots, large or small, and in all colors are smart, but particularly smart when of navy-blue on a light background with a border design. We present here a one-piece frock, the simple design of which is admirably suited to materials of this type. The dress opens at the neck and is finished with a round boyish collar. The long sleeves are trimmed with tailored cuffs, and two inset pockets furnish a decorative note.

Oshawa Times, Feb 14 1928, p5.

The Canadian Statesman, February 23, 1928

Page 2
A Prince’s Peonies
So numerous were the letters received acknowledging the peony plants which the Prince of Wales had distributed throughout Canada last fall as a memento of his visit that His Royal Highness has requested that his formal acknowledgement to the Bank of Montreal, through whom the letters were forwarded to him, be taken as constituting a general reply. It will be remembered that His Royal Highness asked the bank to undertake for him the distribution of Canadian-grown peony plants to His Excellency the Governor-General, the prime minister and member of his cabinet, the lieutenant-governors and premiers of provinces; also to all cities, towns and incorporated villages throughout Canada.

Canadian Statesman, Feb 23 1928, p2.

Page 3
Symphony Speaker

The famous Rogers “Two-Twenty” (now in its second successful year) is the standard in performance and quality that every manufacturer of the “new” electric sets is striving to attain. The former price of this model alone was $275, now you can buy it in combination with the Junior Symphony Speaker (built into a handsome Walnut-finished Table) for $275- no more than you would pay for any first-class battery operated set!

If you’re “sold” on the Rogers Batteryless principle- if you want to replace your old battery set with the first and only time-tested batteryless receiver- here is the radio “buy” of the season for you.

Canadian Statesman, Feb 23 1928, p3.

Page 4
Wood Sale

Saturday, February 25th–E. C. Ashton will sell on Lot 14. Con. 8. Darlington, 5 acres standing mixed timber, mostly cedar, suitable for posts and anchor posts, in ¼ acre lots, more or less. Timber must be removed by April 4, 1928, owing to Hydro passing through. Sale at 1p.m. For terms see dodgers. T.M. Slemon, Auctioneer.

The Month That Was – January 1873

All articles originally appeared in the Ontario Reformer

January 3, 1873, page 1

Wool Prices – The great advance in the price of wool has led considers to expect a corresponding rise in Winter Goods. They will be agreeably disappointed when they visit this well known house. To find that the low prices of last year are still current in many of the leading lines. Piles of heavy Winceys at old prices. Stocks of Woolen Shawls at old prices. Thousands of yards of Flannels at old prices. Heaps of Dress Goods at old prices. Lots of Blankets at old prices, &c.,&c

Slates to be Abolished – A general war is being waged against the use of slates in the schools of Germany. There is scarcely any sound more offensive to the human ear than the grating of the pencil on the slate, and when this is multiplied by the numbers in the school, the effect is said to be extremely injurious to the nerves of many children, and leave evil influences for life. In addition to this, the use of slates is attended with many other disadvantages. Children acquire a heavy hand by their use, and accustom themselves to a vicious holding of the pen. Physicians say that the sight is injured by it. The slate is heavy and is easily broken, and is a noisy implement in the school-room, besides being quite inconvenient to carry with books. In short, the slate ought to be abolished entirely, is the verdict.

January 3, 1873, Page Two

Page 2

Importing Labourers – We notice that the Ontario Government is now taking steps to properly organize a system by which those of our farmers who are in want of laborers can obtain them through emigration agencies stations at various points in Great Britain. By depositioning $21 with the Commissioner of Agriculture of Ontario for each adult required, they can obtain labour at a cheap rate, the money to be repaid back to the employer out of the wages of the labourer, except $6 per head which is given back to the employer as a bonus for bringing out each emigrant, or to the emigrant himself if he pays for his own passage out.

January 10, 1873, Page 1

The Coolest Robbery on Record – Policeman Badger of the Tenth Station had a bit of experience the other night which he is not fond of talking about. It was past midnight as he was leisurely pushing his way through Jessup Street, and when he came opposite to Drayton & Gogg’s jewelry store he observed gleams of light through the chinks of the shutters and rapped at the door:

“Is that you, policeman?” asked a voice within,

“Yes,” answered Badger. 

“Well, it’s only me. It’s all right– Kind o’ chilly out, isn’t it?”

“Yea.”

“Thought so. I was just fixing the fire. Good night.”

Badger said “good night,” and pursued on his way.

An hour afterwards Badger passed through Jessup street again and saw the light in the jewelry store. It didn’t look right, and he banged the door loudly…

Policeman Badger partook. Having wiped his lips and giving his fingers a new warming, he left the store and resumed his best, satisfied that all was right at Drayton and Fogg’s.

 But morning brought a new revealment.

Drayton & Fogg’s store had been robbed during the night of six thousand dollars’ worth of watches and jewelry; and though policeman Badger carries in his mind an exact daguerreotype of the robber, the adroit rascal has not yet been found.

January 10, 1873, Page2

What Causes Hard Times – We are fast becoming a nation of schemers to live without genuine work. Our boys are not learning trades; our farmer’s sons are crowded into cities, looking for clerkships in the Post Office; hardly one Canadian girl in each hundred will do housework for wages, however urgent her need; so we are sending to Europe for workmen and buying of her artisans’ worth of products that we ought to make for ourselves.

Page 2

Death of the Ex-Emperor Napoleon – The French ex-Emperor, Napoleon, died at Chishelhurst yesterday at 10:45. He had been suffering for a long time from a severe internal disease, and had undergone two or three operations. He was 65 years of age.

January 24, 1873, page 1

Touching Instance – ONE of the most touching instances of gratitude is alleged to have occurred at Lock Haven the other day. A little boy, the child of a welthy mother, tumbled into the river. He was rescued by a workingman and reatored to his parents. The woman gave the man a three cent postage stamp and said she would be glad to have him come up to her house and sit out in the entry and hear her play the piano. He wents-way with tears in his eyes. Such unnaccustomed kindness quite unnamed him.

Page 2

Lot Auction – STEELE BROS, sold their lots on the corner of King and Simcoe streets, by auction, yesterday, for the sum of $5,000. The corner lot has a frontage of 26 feet 6 inches on King street, and 64 feet 3 inches on Simcoe street; and was bought by W. H. Gibbs, Esq., for the sum of $3,000. The back lot has a frontage of 27 feet on Simcoe street, and 52 feet 7 inches deep, and was purchased by Mr . S. Trewin, for the sum of $2,000. 

Page 4

Temperley’s Line – The Steamers of this Line are intended to sail from Quebec and Montreal every Tuesday during the seasons of navigation of 1872, and from London every Wednesday, calling at Plymouth on the way out. Though tickets from all points west at reduced rates. Certificates issued to parties desirous of bringing out their friends. For full particulars apply to the Company’s Agent at Oshawa.
C. W. SMITH 

January 24, 1873, Page Four

The Month That Was – December 1866

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Vindicator

December 05, 1866, Page 2

AN OUTRAGE
On Friday night last, some person or persons entered the office of the Cobourg Sentinel, and knocked into pi a large quantity of standing type, scattering the forms in all directions upon the floor, and thus causing very great trouble and loss. The matter disarranged was the first, third and fourth pages of the paper, two cases of small type, and a quantity of standing type, set up for last week’s Sentinel. The cause of the outrage was the appearance in a previous number, of a treasonable article. The editor, however, says it was written by a correspondent and set up without his first examining it.

LUCKY
The Port Perry Observer of last Thursday has the following: – Mr. Thos. Paxton of this place yesterday received a telegram from his agent in Petrolia, informing him that the oil well, in which he holds a large interest, commenced flowing at the rate of a thousand barrels a day.

We wish Mr. Paxton the best of luck, but we don’t believe the story. A Western paper reported an 800 barrel well but added that amount ought to be received with caution.

December 05, 1866 Page 03

YACHT RACE ACROSS THE OCEAN
A yacht race across the Atlantic has been arranged in New York and is now exciting a good deal of interest in that city. Three yachts – the Fleetwing, owned by Mr. Osgood; the Vests, by Mr. Lorillard; and the Henrietta, by J. G. Bennet, Jr., start from New York for Cowes on the 11th of December, the one arriving first to be entitled to the sum or $90,000, which has been staked on the result. The season selected for this race is the most inclement of the year, and the excursion under the circumstances is likely to be anything but a pleasant trip.

December 12, 1866, Page 2

OSHAWA SKATING RINK
We have been requested to state that the Rink is now open to the public. There is a capital sheet of ice on it. Tickets can be had at J. A. Gibson’s Book Store, or from any of the members of the committee.

POLICE COURT
On Monday David Webb and Wm. Tallamy were brought before S. B. Fairbanks, charged with being drunk and fighting on Saturday evening last. They were fined five dollars and costs each.

A NARROW ESCAPE
On Thursday last, Mr. J. O. Guy, Reeve of East Whitby, had narrow escaped with his life. He went over to the barn of Mr. Thomas Henry, who was there engaged in threshing. Whilst standing near the tumbling shaft talking to Mr. Henry a pin in the shaft caught his coat and winding it around and around and drawing him closer to the shaft. Mr. Henry seized Mr. Guy, and by their united exertions the coat was torn off. When the machine was stopped there was but a piece of one sleeve left.

December 19, 1866, Page 1

A LONG KICK
Two Irishmen engaged in peddling packages of linen, bought an old mule to aid in carrying the burdens. One would ride a while, then the other, carrying the burdens. – One day, the Irishmen who was on foot got close up to the heels of his mule-ship, when he received a kick on one of his shins. To be revenged, he picked up a stone, and hurled it at the mule but by accident, struck his companion on the back of the head. Seeing what he has done, he stopped, and begun to groan and rub his shin. The one on the mule turned and asked him what was the matter. ‘The crathur’s kicked me,’ was the reply, ‘Be japers,’ said the other, ‘he’s did the same thing to me on the back of the head.’

December 19, 1866 Page 03

Page 2

Married
In Toronto, on the 12th inst., by Rev. S. Rose, Mr. Thos. Conant and Miss Margaret Gifford, both of East Whitby.

December 26, 1866, Page 2

NOMINATION OF COUNCILORS
Pursuant to the provisions of the new Municipal Act, a public meeting was held in the Town Hall for the nomination of candidates for the offices of Reeve, Deputy Reeve, and Councilors, for 1867. The number of ratepayers present at the opening of proceedings with small, about 50; And did not increase to the end. The following is the list of nominations with their proposals an seconders for the several officers:-

At the conclusion of the nomination, the old council were called upon for a statement of the affairs of the village for the past year.

SB Fairbanks came forward and gave an abstract of the village accounts. Before doing so, however, he alluded to some changes which had been made in the assessment act, whereby all property would be henceforth assessed upon its real value, and thus renters would not be compelled to pay more taxes in proportion than freeholders.- From an abstract of receipts and expenditures which he read, the Reeve showed that the receipts for the year were $8365.87, and the expenditures $7963.38, leaving a cash balance in the hands of the treasure of $402.49. This added to notes due on the 1st of January, and certain ammunition on hand valued at $147.96, would leave on the 1st of January a balance, after deducting some liabilities which now cannot be exactly determined, of about $750. …

Proceedings were then adjourned until the first Monday in January, when the election will be held. Who will run, and who will not, is a question that it would be difficult to answer; Some caucusing and scheming will take place before the tickets are made out. It is to be hoped that matters may yet be arranged to avoid a contest. It is not likely that all will go to the poll.- Mr. Duliea has already requested that his name be taken off the list.

THE LATEST- We understand that Messrs. Fairbanks and Michaels are to be the candidates for Reeve, and Messrs. WH Gibbs and Fowke for Deputy. The tickets further than this are not fully determined upon.

Died
At Port Oshawa, on Friday morning, the 21st inst., Eliza Jane Henry, wife of Thomas Guy, aged 35 years.

In Oshawa, on Saturday evening, the 22nd inst., Julia Ann Bates, wife of Dr. William McGill, aged 48 years.

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