ArteFACTS: Fisher Body Craftsman’s Guild Coach, 1933

By Melissa Cole, Curator

The artefact featured in today’s blog post is one of the Oshawa Museum’s recent acquisitions.  I was hoping that this artefact could be included in our latest exhibition Celebrating 60: Sixty Years of Collecting unfortunately the coach is very fragile and does require some conservation work before it is placed on display for a period of time.  Although anyone that attends our Exhibition Opening next week will get an opportunity to view the coach as it will be on display, for one week only, along with the original plans and instructions for building the coach.

So what exactly was the Fisher Body Craftsman Guild, and what was its purpose?

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Fisher Body was an automobile coachbuilder founded by the Fisher Brothers in 1908 in Detroit Michigan.  By the 1920s, the Fisher Body Company had become one of the biggest and best known suppliers of automobile bodies in North America.  General Motors acquired the majority of the holdings of the Fisher Body Company in the early 1920s.  By 1926, General Motors turned the company into its main coach-building factory.   One of the obstacles that General Motors faced at the time was the lack of designers available for hire.

Starting in the 1930s, The Fisher Body Company in Detroit, in conjunction with General Motors in Detroit and Oshawa where the Canadian Headquarters was located, ran a series of competitions in design and styling for teenage students.  In the early years of the competition, contestants ordered a set of model plans to build a Napoleonic Carriage which was the signature logo of the company.

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The Fisher Body Craftsman’s Guild became the major recruiting tool for young artistic talent.  Each year twenty-four scholarships were awarded to boys between the ages of 12 and 16 in Canada and the United States.  These scholarships ranged in value from $500 up to $5000 in 1933.

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The Oshawa Museum has one of the earliest surviving Napoleonic carriages from the Guild competition in Canada.  This particular model was submitted for competition in 1933 by Floyd Hembruff.   When this carriage was submitted for donation to the Oshawa Museum it was accompanied by the original plans, contest rules, model diagrams and cut outs with assembly instructions.  The coach itself is 46 cm long, with the tongue added the total length is 71cm, the height is 28 cm and the width is 23 cm.  The finished model weighs about 7 pounds (3 Kg).

By 1938, with the increasing interest in car styling, the Craftsman’s Guild introduced a new category – designing and building a model car. The interest in the car design competition was so overwhelming that the Napoleonic Coach was dropped. By 1968, when the Craftsman’s Guild was concluded, over 8.7 million youths had enrolled over the life of the competition, millions of dollars in Awards had been given and many lives had been touched – some profoundly. Thru the years, the Craftsman’s Guild represented rock-solid values. Young men learned that perseverance was essential and that hard work paid off. They enjoyed a sense of pride and accomplishment that comes from a constructive and positive activity – plus the joy of working with their hands and mind to create their very own design.

Many scholarships are given each year to young people with outstanding athletic ability or outstanding scholastic record.  What made the Craftsman’s Guild unique was recognition and reward for young people with outstanding creative ability.  Many of the winners went on to become designers themselves and others such as Floyd Hembruff became Mayor of his community and founding partner of a respected construction company in Matheson Ontario, Hembruff & Dambrowitz Construction Ltd. which built extensively throughout Northern Ontario.

Celebrating 60: Our Favourite Things

This blog series comes from our dedicated and awesome Visitor Host staff, and topics range from favourite artefacts, thoughts on our latest exhibits, and anything else in between!

Kathryn’s Favourite: Granny Cock PortraitDSCN1537

Harriet, you often catch me of guard when I am in front of you in Guy House in the board room; your piercing eyes are always calling my attention.

Your eyes speak volumes to me; Harriet your story is one of being so brave, and determined. Yet the deeper I consider your eyes you are trying to tell me something different aside from facts.

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The facts are impressive though; you a widow at age 59 travels in 1846 by boat from England to Canada and let me say you were an old woman by that year’s standards. Please excuse me Harriet! You travelled with your daughter and son-in- law  and yes, the voyage was exceptional long and miserable and yes, many people died from either small pox, dysentery or measles.

Then once you got here there were no fine shops to buy another pretty delicate lace bonnet that you cherished or even the fine slippers that you are wearing right now. That wool shawl would have been perfect here, warm and practical.

Harriet Cock, I know you were scared as your eyes really tell me so; however, who would not be afraid travelling in 1846 to a new world! You took the risk; you came here as a pioneer and believed in this country.  Our country, Canada

Granny Cock, thank you.

You are my treasured artefact and champion here at The Oshawa Museum.

 

Caitlan’s Favourite: The Music Box017

There are many very interesting artefacts throughout the houses at the Oshawa Museum. It is a treat to see them, especially when you know that they still work.  On a rare occasion one of our music boxes plays. It has not seized up, nor is it broken. Many items over time would have been damaged in one way or another preventing them for further use or are to delicate to risk trying to play. This item is an exception. Done with care a few times a year this music box fills Henry House with sound. This sets it apart from many other items in the houses.

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By playing the music box you can be given a small taste of what life would have sounded like at the time. Just the practice of winding it and knowing how much sound it would produce and for how long creates a greater depth of understanding of people’s lives. It is a favorite artifact of mine for this reason. It provides an understanding that cannot be presented simply in writing thereby creating a fuller understanding of the lives people lived.

Listen to one of the Music Box’s as the background music in this video!

 

Carrie’s Favourite: Thomas and Lurenda Letters

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My favorite artefacts would have to be two letters, one from Thomas and the other from Lurenda. I love them so much because of the content of them, that being the marriage proposal and acceptance. It’s strange to think, at least now, that you would be able to propose to someone in this way, and with barely knowing the other person as well. Two letters led to one big family, which led to even more interesting letters between Thomas and his children. Seeing the start of the family in black and white makes you realize how much has changed between then and now.

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Read about Karen’s Favourite Artefact HERE

Be sure to visit our 2017 Feature Exhibit Celebrating 60: Sixty Years of Collecting and discover your favourite artefact!

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Cabinets of Curiosity: Sixty Years of Collecting

By Melissa Cole, Curator

Since 1957 our collection has grown in ways that may surprise the average visitor.  With more than 50 000 objects and archival records, our collection is vast and unsurpassed in its diversity and size in the City.  Celebrating our first 60 years, the OM will feature objects with the richest stories to tell, from our 1837 Rebellion Box to our largest artefacts, the historic homes.

As a homage to our own history, we are presenting this exhibition as an interpretation of the cabinet of curiosity.  Given our curious natures and innate desire to collect, it is no wonder that the modern museum has its roots planted in the privately owned collections of extraordinary objects from the past.  These collections, called cabinets of curiosity, first became popular in the Renaissance and reached their peak of popularity in the Victorian Era.  Amateur and professional scientists kept their most prize specimens hidden away, until the elite members of society began to seek them out and placed in ornate display cases for all to see.  Some of these collections filled entire rooms.

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Inside Celebrating 60

Our exhibition, Celebrating 60: Sixty Years of Collecting features rarely seen, a few odd and curious objects drawn from the Oshawa Museum’s collection.  Deciding which artefacts to display was not an easy task, with assistance from museum staff members who shared their favourite artefacts and we asked Oshawa Historical Society members to assist us in choosing a quilt to display in the exhibition.  Visitors will have the unique opportunity to peruse various objects and documents of curiosity and wonder, up close and in a personal way.

This exhibition is dedicated to the OM’s past Curators, not only for the artefacts they helped to collect but for the stories and material culture they helped to preserve for future generations.

Join us at the Oshawa Museum in celebrating our first 60 years.

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Celebrating 60: Karen’s Favourite Artefact

This blog series comes from our dedicated and awesome Visitor Host staff, and topics range from favourite artifacts, thoughts on our latest exhibits, and anything else in between!

By Karen A., Visitor Host

Working at the Oshawa Museum, I have the opportunity to see and learn about new artefacts everyday. Walking through the door of Henry House, I enter into the 19th century, gradually reversing back into a simpler period where social media, computers, electricity, and yes, indoor plumbing does not exist.  Although I adore every room in Henry House, the parlor catches my eye and I delicately walk in careful of the perfectly placed tea set awaiting upon the tabletop. What I find most magical about the Victorian parlor is the design and style which is opposite of the 21st century in every way. The Henry House parlor is a place to relax quietly while sitting and reading, enjoying the elegant pieces of art that surround the room.

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My favourite artefact in the parlor is the wax flower dome that sits upon a table in the parlor. The flower dome was a trend in the Victorian period becoming so popular almost every house obtained one. Made of the wax, the flowers were designed beautifully in various colours to demonstrate wealth and prestige.

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Detail of 012.10.1, after conservation

Although the history of the flower dome is interesting, what is also special about this artefact is the scientific side of it. Flower domes needed to be created in particular ways to that once the wax was hardened and put in place, then the dome could be placed perfectly on top. One would need to cut the glass to specific measurements for the preservation of the wax and the flowers. What I find most unique about the flower dome is the ability to preserve the wax to continue to have it on display for generations to come.


To find out more about our favourite artefacts, visit the Oshawa Museum and see our 2017 feature exhibit: Celebrating 60: Sixty Years of Collecting, opening April 18, 2017!

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For more on the Wax Flower Dome, read our blog post, or listen to Curator Melissa Cole in our Podcast

ArteFACTS: About the Meat Juice Press

By Melissa Cole, Curator

In the Oshawa Museum’s collection, we have a unique artifact that I am sure many culinary historians would like to try out if they haven’t already: a Meat Juice Press.  Back in the late 1800s this item was considered a must-have for many affluent households.  The reason being that during the 1800s meat juice was used as a concentrated form of nourishment for the ill.  This particular style of meat press would have been used to extract juice from beef, boiled mutton, tongue or boned turkey.  This one is heavily embossed.  On one side it reads “LANDERS, FRARY & CLARK NEW BRITAIN, Connecticut U.S.A.” and on the other side it is embossed “COLUMBIA MEAT JUICE PRESS MADE IN U.S.A. 1”

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Columbia was an early brand name used by Landers, Frary & Clark. The company was founded in 1882, when Landers and Smith Co. acquired Frary & Clark, a well-known manufacturer of housewares and hardware.

This particular press measures 7 1/2″ Tall, 4 1/4″ wide (not counting the handle of the masher). It is comprised of four cast iron pieces that can be separated.  The press, pressing handle and a frame that has embossed lettering on both sides and the fluted cup which contains a spout for pouring the extracted juices.

This household item would most likely have been used to make “beef tea.”  If you open a book about 19th century dietary remedies it would be hard to find one that does not mention beef tea. It was a type of broth – made with beef and water – given to patients to drink if they were suffering from digestive problems, fever or weakness. People believed that the tea was nutritious and easy on the stomach, which would help patients to return to their former fortitude.

The benefits of making and drinking beef tea were featured in numerous cookbooks in the 1800s.  The following information was taken from an 1887 cookbook:

The liquid obtained contains all the nourishing qualities of the flesh and none of the indigestible structure, and it is much more palatable than ordinary soup or beef tea and is decidedly more nutritious.

Don’t confuse Beef Tea with today’s beef broth.  Beef tea and beef broth are very different. Beef tea, is almost like a distilled essence of beef, (similar to the French l’essence de boeuf) very intense, and powerful nutrition when someone is sick and ailing.  It would be particularly useful after surgery, especially with blood loss, because of the iron in it.  Two recipes were found on the Royal College of Physicians of London England’s website and explains how to make beef tea.

Start by browning half a pound of super-lean, flavorful beef (something like eye of round or blade steak, trimmed of fat and connective tissue), cut it into small cubes and place them into clean mason jar with a lid.  This jar would then be placed into another large pot of water.  Loosely cover the large pot containing the jar and allow it to simmer for 2-4 hours.  It will concentrate into a distilled form of liquid beef.  After 2-4 hours, place the beef cubes into the meat press, the screw on the press would be raised and the pressing handle removed from the cup and the meet placed in the cup and the press handle placed back on top.  The screw of the press would be lowered and pressing the meat. Keep the liquid that is pressed from the beef, along with the liquid that remained in the jar after simmering and mix them together to create beef tea.  When it cools the liquid solidifies into a thick gelatin.

Below is another image taken from The Pharmacopoeia of the London Hospital.  This was in a guide created to aid staff and students of the hospital in the art of prescribing.  It covered how to take notes on patients, prescribing for children and diets for patients.  Beef tea was featured heavily in the meal plans.

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Beef tea would have also been given to soldiers serving overseas.  Florence Nightingale detailed the average daily issue of special dietary items for the War Office.  Top of that list was 25 gallons of beef tea. 80 lb of meat would have been used to make this tea.

Beef tea can be served either in its raw state or gently cooked.  Don’t confuse Beef tea with todays beef broth.  Beef tea was richer and thicker than our traditional beef broth today and contained much for nourishment in comparison to the water downed broth purchased in stores today.  Today’s Bovril, which is the trademarked name of that thick, salty meat extract, developed in the 1870s in Canada by a Scotsman named John Lawson Johnson. The product was originally called “Johnston’s Fluid Beef” and its creation stemmed from beef tea but in a simpler easier to use form.

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