The Month That Was – January 1862

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Vindicator

January 1, 1862
Page 2
Death of Prince Albert

By the arrival of the Persia, on Monday of last week, we have the painful news of the sudden death of the husband of our beloved Queen. The telegraph announced the solemn and [startling] fact so very coolly that, coming as it did without any previous warning, or word as to his sickness, it scarcely obtained credit from the public. The following is the dispatch referred to: —

“His Royal Highness, Prince Albert, expired at noon of Sunday the 15th inst., of gastric fever. His illness was not considered dangerous until Friday.”…

The Queen and the Royal Family surrounded the death-bed of the Prince.

Page 3
Dog Lost

Lost in Oshawa on the 3rd instant, a White Bulldog with both ears cropped – the right one a little shorter than the left. He has a grey spot on his back and one on his hind parts, and a long tail. Any person returning the same to the undersigned will be liberally rewarded for their trouble. F. Prevost, Tonner. Oshawa, Dec 24th, 1861.

Black and White newspaper ad for John Warren's store
January 1, 1862, page 3

January 8, 1862
Page 2
Militia Appointments

The Hon. John A. Macdonald has been charged by His Excellency with the supervision of matters connected with the Militia of the Province, under the deisgnatin of Minister of Militia affairs.

His excellency has likewise been pleased to appoint Lt.-Colonel John Richard Nash, late of Her Majesty;’s 15th Regiment, to be Deputy Adjutant General of Militia for Upper Canada.

Oshawa Municipal Election

On Monday morning last, at 10 o’clock, the electors assembled in the courthouse for the purpose of nominating candidates for the council for 1862. The returning officer, Mr. Wm. E Mark, having taken his position, called for nominations, and in the course of 15 or 20 minutes, no less than 25 gentlemen were proposed by their friends. After the nominations were closed, the returning officer called for a show of hands, for each of the gentleman nominated; with the following results:

SB Fairbanks, 53. Thos. Eck and DF Burk, each 51. TN Gibbs, 49. D. Spaulding, 46. E. Dunn, 42. GH Grierson, 41. WW Brown, 37. J Hislop and G Wallace, 26. E Carswell, 24. John Cade, 2. Jas. Chase and Robert Graham, 20. DH Merritt, 18. A Hackett and J Carmichael, 16. RT Manuel, 15. W Dickie, 14. A Thompson, 13. Dr. McGill, 12. J. Gilchrist, 10. &c. &c.

According to the show of hands, Messrs., Fairbanks, Eck, Burk, Gibbs and Spaulding were, for the first time being, declared duly elected.

The various gentleman put in nomination, were then called upon for speeches…

The members of the Oshawa Council for 1864 are, therefore:

SB Fairbanks, Thomas Eck, DF Burk, WW Brown, Edward Dunne.

It is understood, as a matter of course, that Mr. Fairbanks will remain in the Reeve’s chair another year.

East Whitby Election

Mr. Fowke being about to remove to Oshawa, did not present himself for reelection in the Township. The other four members accepted nominations, and two new men were brought out, Mr. James O Guy, and Robert Smith – the latter, a brother of Mr. John Smith, who has been in the council ever since the division of the Township. Mr. Guy appears to be the favorite candidate, and led the poll from the commencement, closely followed by Messrs., Rob’t Smith, John Smith, and Wm Bartlett, while a close contest was, for some time, kept up between the respective friends of Messrs. Ratcliff and Doolittle. Mr. Ratcliff, however, always kept the lead, being 30 ahead at the close of the first day. At the close of the poll on Tuesday, the following gentleman were declared duly elected: —

James O. Guy, Robert Smith, Wm. Bartless, John Smith, John Ratcliff.

Page 3
$50 Reward

Whereas on the morning of the 17th day of August, 1861, there was laid at the door of William Bartless, on Lot No. 15 in the 1st concession of East Whitby, a female infant; and on the 27th of the same month, at the doors of Abram Skinner on Lot No. 3 in the 4th concession of East Whitby, a male infant; — A reward of $50 (fifty dollars) will be paid by the Corporation of East Whitby to any person who will prosecute to conviction the principal, or agent, in either of the above cases of child desertion.

Given under my hand at East Whitby aforesaid, on the 30th day of December, 1861. John Ratcliff, Town Reeve.

Black and white clippings from the newspaper
January 8, 1862, page 3

January 22, 1862
Page 2
Sleighing and Business

Until about a week ago, everybody was talking of the lack of snow, and the consequent dullness of the season, but now we have plenty of snow, splendid sleighing, and business is as brisk as the day is long. Our streets are, at times, almost blockaded with teams standing in front of stores, and passing and repassing – reminding a person of similar scenes in metropolitan streets. Enormous loads of cordwood, wheat, flour and other commodities pass along Simcoe Street every few minutes. As we write, four or five teams have passed along, each drawing the enormous load of two cords of wood on a single sleigh, for which the owners get $5.50 cash down, and hurry home to bring in another load in the afternoon before the price falls, which it mist soon do at the rate wood is coming in…

Page 3

Free Schools – We learn that the ratepayers in the School Section in Saxon’s Settlement, Darlington, have this year adopted the free school principle for the first time, without any opposition. –In the section in East Whitby, at Maxwell’s Corners, we learn that the Free School principle has been adopted this year, for the second time, by a majority of two to one, though carrid by a majority of only two or three, last year.

Stray Cattle

Three stray cattle came into the premises about the 1st of December, which may be described as follows: – One white Steer, with a few red spots; one red muley; and one red heifer with some white hairs. All, apparently, coming two years old in the spring. The owners are requested to prove property, pay damages and take them away. Thos. & Phin. Henry, Port Oshawa, January 16, 1862.

Black and White newspaper ad for David F. Burk's store
January 22, 1862, page 3

January 29 1862
Page 2
Selling Liquor Without License

On Saturday last the keepers of the British American and the Wellington houses, Messrs. RT Manuel and N Dyer, were again summoned before the Reeve on the charge of selling Intoxicating Liquors without license – the former for the third time, and the latter for the second. The charge being satisfactorily proven, the highest fine the law permits – twenty dollars – was imposed upon each. Mr. Manuel again gave notice of his intention to appeal to the Assizes, a la Spaulding. This makes the second fine of twenty dollars which he has appealed; – with what object, except to put off the date of payment, it is difficult to perceive, for it is not very likely that the fines have been illegally imposed.

Black and white newspaper ad for Dentist James Stephens
January 29, 1862, page 4

What a settler would have to do in their first year

By Adam A., Visitor Host

As the end of the year approaches, it is common to reflect on what one has accomplished. For a new settler in early Upper Canada, that would necessarily be quite a lot. Land Granting in Upper Canada prior to the War of 1812 was a regulated and centrally administered affair with standard plans for townships, screening of settlers, and preferred orders of development. These measures laid out a number of formal and informal hurdles for a prospective settler to overcome. These measures were imposed in part because only the colonial government, through treaties such as the Gunshot Treaty of 1787-8, was permitted to acquire land from the First Nations who inhabited Upper Canada. Settlers were not permitted to take unceded lands on their own initiative. Any who did so were deemed to be squatters endangering relations with the First Nations who, prior to 1812, were still considered to be critical allies for the defence of British North America.

After arriving in Canada, a prospective pioneer would need to be screened for loyalty by the local district magistrates. The British had recently lost what is now the United States of America and were keen to be sure that the new colony of Upper Canada would not suffer the same fate. If successful, the new settler would give an Oath of Loyalty to the Crown and receive a certificate of loyalty. Then they would need to attend a meeting of the Land Committee in York (now Toronto) to present their claim, agree to the government’s terms, and receive the Location Ticket that outlined the location and size of their land grant. Having obtained that it would be the duty of the settler to make for their lot with all due haste and set about improving it to satisfy the government that they were genuine settlers. At this time, land in Canada was free; the only cost associated with a 200 acre grant was 5 pounds and 11 shillings worth of fees to acquire the necessary paperwork and cover the costs of the survey (and these fees were waived for Loyalist refugees), and the government was keenly aware that such low costs might attract speculators.

Colour illustration showing a group of people working at cutting lumber by a water's edge. There is a small wood cabin, and two cows assisting with the work, and there are tall trees in the background.
From Thomas Conant’s Upper Canada Sketches, “Logging Scene, Roger Conant in Darlington, Co. Durham, Upper Canada, 1778;” illustration by ES Shrapnel

The government mandated that any pioneer could only keep their grant provided they cleared and fenced at least five acres and erected a house of at least 16 by 20 feet within a year of obtaining their grant. Given seven acres was the upper end of how much land could be cleared in a year, and no agricultural work could be undertaken until enough land was cleared, these were not unreasonable or excessively burdensome expectations. Still, the work involved was extremely labour intensive. Trees would need to be felled, and stumps would need to be pulled from the ground. This was a difficult and lengthy process, involving the clearing of about 2,500 trees per acre, but it came with immediate benefit. The fallen trees could be used to build the pioneer’s home and fence, another portion would typically be burned to clear the remaining undergrowth and fertilize the soils with ash, and the remainder could be used for income. Early on it was common for excess wood to be burned and refined into potash which could be sold downstream to Montreal. Common practice was to cut down trees during the day and then devote long hours in the night to tending to the fires. As an area developed, a pioneer could instead sell their unneeded tree trunks to a local lumber mill. The profits from artisanal forestry could sustain the pioneer family while they developed their farm to the point where agricultural activity could sustain them. Circumstances permitting, an early pioneer might further supplement their income by engaging in the local fur trade, as Roger Conant did in our area.

Having taken up their land and proven their industriousness, the new pioneer was meant to return to York to receive their land patent, fully conferring the legal ownership of the land to them. However, many pioneers would skip this step due to their distance from York or preoccupation in their local area and only sought their patent when they intended to sell their land or needed to settle a boundary dispute. Regardless of whether they took this step, the early pioneer’s first year would have been a whirlwind of travel and work.


Sources:

Conant, Thomas. Life in Canada. Toronto; William Briggs, 1903.

Moorman, David T. The ‘First Business of Government’: the Land Granting Administration of Upper Canada, 1998.

Lewis, Frank D., and M. C. Urquhart. “Growth and the Standard of Living in a Pioneer Economy: Upper Canada, 1826 to 1851.” The William and Mary Quarterly 56, no. 1 (1999): 151–81.

The Month That Was – December 1922

Articles originally appeared in the Ontario Reformer; Newspapers from 1922, and 1926-1928 have recently been made available online, thanks to the Oshawa Public Library. Read more here: https://news.ourontario.ca/oshawa/1115358/issues/1922

December 2, 1922, Page 1
Cedar Dale Residents Discuss Annexation; Many Sign Petitions

Opponents of Movement Make Little Progress – Would Delay matters by Calling Vote of Ratepayers Fifty Sign Annexation Petition at Meeting – Majority Favour Proposal

Municipal Board Must Decide Issue

The majority of Cedar Dale residents desire annexation to the Town of Oshawa. They demonstrated that in no uncertain terms at an enthusiastic meeting held on Thursday evening in the Temperance Hall, Cedar Dale. At this meeting, GD Conant, one of the prime movers in the scheme, was the principal speaker. He outlined the whole proposition from beginning to end and cleared up many misunderstandings that had existed prior to this meeting. At the conclusion of his address he was the recipient of much applause and when he called upon those who were in favor of annexation to come forward and sign the petition approximately 50 electors complied and affixed their signatures to the petition…

Edward Powers, who has steadily opposed the scheme, was present with a handful of followers, but he fought a losing battle from the start and the audience did not take kindly to his suggestions. At one time during the evening Mr. Powers charged that intimidation had been used to get names on the petition favoring annexation…

Page 3
Slight Chimney Fire

Very little damage was done when fire broke out in the home of Mr. Alfred Robinson, Queen street, late yesterday afternoon. The chimney caught fire when the pipes became overheated byt it was detected in time to prevent serious consequences. An alarm was turned in and the Fire Brigade made a quick response. It was not necessary to use the hose as the fire had merely started. Precautions were taken to prevent fire from breaking out again.

newspaper ad for Buckley's Bronchitis Mixture
Ontario Reformer, December 2, 1922, page 5

December 5, 1922 page 2

The Whitby Gazette thinks that Oshawa is asking too much when we request a half million dollar harbor. Now how would it be if we waited a few years and when we annexed Whitby we could use their harbor!

December 7, 1922, Third Section
Stores Doing Rushing Christmas Business

The slogan “Do Your Christmas Shopping Early” has taken a strong hold in Oshawa if the throngs on the streets and in the town’s busy stores are any criterion. Every afternoon recently has seen large crowds of shoppers out doing their Christmas purchasing and the stores along Simcoe and King Streets have found their capacities and help taxed to the limit in coping with the situation…

Christmas decorations are seen in the windows while within the stores have a gala appearance which is seen at no other time of the year. Be they grocery stores, stationers’ shops, jewelry stores or departmental stores, it makes no difference – the same atmosphere pervades them one and all…

Talking to Reformer representative AE Lovell, of Jury & Lovell, the Rexall store, said: “Business is fine and increasing daily. We anticipate a record breaking turnover during the Christmas season.”

Page 8
William T. Henry

The death of William T. Henry, well-known resident of Oshawa and for many years harbor master of the town, occurred at his residence, 92 Albert Street yesterday afternoon. Deceased had been in failing health for some time but had been confined to the house for only a few days. He was seventy-three years of age.

Surviving are his wife, two brothers, Joseph and Jesse, and three sisters, Mrs. E. Dearborn, Mrs. John McGill and Mrs. C. Stone. The funeral will be held from the late residence on Friday afternoon, Rev. ET Cotton conducting the services.

newspaper ad for H. Engel, advertising their Christmas wares and encouraging customers to "Shop Early"
Ontario Reformer, December 7, 1922, page 20

December 9, 1922, page 3
Slippery Streets

The old saying that “the wicked walk in slippery places” was well exemplified on Friday. The sleet made a glassy surface all over the sidewalks much to the delight of the school kiddies and young folk, who slid all the way to and from school or work, as the case might be. The older and more sedate took the middle of the road. Some amusing incidents took place when boys on bicycles or careless pedestrians lost their under pinnings and measured their lengths on the streets. For the young people this meant laughter, but it is somewhat of a serious thing when older people fall.

December 12, 1922, page 3
History of Oshawa as a Gift

In sending Christmas presents to distant friends do not forget Dr. Kaiser’s “History of Oshawa.” He has 100 copies left which has will dispose of at $3 each. Many public libraries in Canada, England and the United States have sent for a copy of this work for their shelves. The University of Toronto “Historic Review” speaks of it as a “creditable effort.” The public of Oshawa should show its appreciation of this work by absorbing the entire issues without personal canvass. Christmas seems a good time to remember this effort on behalf of Oshawa.

December 14, 1922, page 1
Complete Cedar Dale Annexation

Little Opposition Offered at Hearing – Some Would Have Matter Put To Vote Of Ratepayers But Board Chairman Declares Petition Makes Move Unnecessary

226 Electors Sign from Total of 350

Cedar Dale becomes a part of Oshawa. Consummation of the scheme of annexation, which has been more a less a dream of the more progressive business men of the town and village for the past eight years, occurred yesterday when the Ontario Railway and Municipal Board met in the Town Hall and ratified the agreement between the Township of East Whitby, the Town of Oshawa, and the Police Village of Cedar Dale…

GD Conant, barrister, was the chief speaker for annexation. He had left nothing undone in an effort to have the scheme materialize and for over fifteen minutes the secretary of the board was busily engaged entering as evidence a large sheaf of statutory declarations and documents presented by Mr. Conant…

Edward Powers was the next to be heard. He had circulated a counter petition to the one favoring annexation. “I am in favor of annexation but want the matter put to a vote,” said Mr. Powers. “Furthermore the petition was carried around by a police trustee. Is that legal?” he asked.

Municipal Board Views Favourably Proposal to have Village Become Part of Municipality of Oshawa

Two Councillors Will Represent each Ward as Result of Cedar Dale Annexation – Will Liven Municipal Race – New Ward to Elect Councillors

The consummation of the annexation of Cedar Dale to Oshawa will make the forthcoming municipal elections in January more interesting than ever. The satisfaction of the agreements entered into by the Township of East Whitby, Oshawa and Cedar Dale, automatically created a new ward. It also means that the new ward is entitled to representation on the council…

Newspaper ad for ad for Luke Brothers, advertising their Christmas wares
Ontario Reformer, December 14, 1922, page 8

December 16, 1922, page 6
Public Schools Will Have Rinks

Albert Street and Centre Street Home and School Clubs will operate open air rinks this winter. The Board of Education at Thursday night’s meeting made a grant of $59 to each club for the purpose of buying the necessary lumber. The senior boys of the club will do most of the work in preparing them.

King Street School this year will have two rinks. Albert Street School did not receive a grant last year and forwarded an application to the Board which was received Thursday night. The board recognizing the necessity of rink accommodation readily granted the request.

December 19, 1922, page 1
Local Jews Are Observing Feast of the Dedication

The Feast of Chanukah, also known as the Feast of Dedication, is being observed this week in Jewish Homes in Oshawa and throughout the country, commencing last Thursday evening and continuing for eight days. This festival is a minor holiday and is reminiscent of the Maccabean victory in the battle of Israel’s faith…

During this festival all children of Jewish faith expect some token. Business places do not close, the festival being observed in the homes and in the House of God.

Newspaper ad for Kodaks, sold at The Rexall Stores, Jury & Lovell
Ontario Reformer, December 19, 1922, page 3

December 21, 1922, page 1
Christmas Rush Swamps Local Postal Staff

The post office is now in the throes of the great annual Christmas rush. Thousands of letters and parcels are pouring into the office. The stamp and registered wickets are doing a roaring business with dozens of people lining up in front of them waiting their turn.

Many people have responded to the request of the postal authorities to mail their parcels early and mark thereon the words “Do not open until Christmas Day.” This is facilitating the work of the department greatly and should result in a few, if any, gifts going astray of being misdelivered…

Mail for Santa

The usual batch of mail addressed to Santa Claus is finding its way to the post office. All of the epistles are addressed in childish hand writing and the address of good Old St. Nich is as numerous as amusing. Some of the kiddies are sending the letters to the North Pose, others to the departmental stores and others are addressed in the care of the post master. All of these little requests are considered to the Ontario Letter Bag and in some mysterious manner are turned over to Santa.

Man Has Close Escape When Car Hits Buggy

Struck by an automobile while driving along the Kingston Road E. with a horse and buggy yesterday morning about eight o’clock, Mr. Benjamin Haines narrowly escaped serious injury. The motor car collided with the buggy with considerable force with the result that Mr. Haines was thrown out and the buggt badly wrecked. It is alleged that the driver of the car did not stop but continued on into Oshawa…

Page 11
Thirty Years Ago from the Reformer

The closing of the Demill Ladies’ College was celebrated on Monday night by an address from Rev. John C. Ferguson.

The Ontario Malleable Iron Company of Oshawa, capital $100,000, has been incorporated with WF Cowan, John Cowan, RJ Cowan, Frederick W. Cowan and Susan Cowan as incorporators.

Black and white newspaper photographs of three Caucasian men, identified as WJ Trick, John Stacey, and R Moffat
Ontario Reformer, December 23, 1922, page 1

December 28, 1922, page 1
Festive Season Was Busy Time Around Oshawa

Christmas business in Oshawa this year was more extensive than in past years, according to local merchants who were interviewed today. Every local store has come in for a good share of the holiday trade and the merchants state that a marked preference has been shown by the buyers for goods of a better quality.

Shoppers seemed to have heeded the repeated warnings of the storekeepers and the exhortations of the press to do their Christmas shipping early, for although the business was heavy it likewise was quite steady over a protracted period…

Page 3
A Blustery Morning

The worthy citizens of Oshawa received a rude shock when they awakened this morning and looked out on a world of white snow being driven in high drifts by the strong wind. The mild weather of Christmas almost led people to believe that there would be no winter this year and instead of snow we would have dandelions and sunflowers, but Jack Frost has still a few kicks left in him.

It was a blustery morning, and the snow which fell was blown in drifts. There was sufficient snow on the ground to make it necessary for the street railway to have their sweeper out while the common or garden variety of citizens were busy with snow shovels and brooms. It was the first real stormy day of this winter.

Wilson & Lee Music Store: The 100 Year Anniversary

By Alicia Tkaczuk, Durham College Intern

Stepping into Wilson & Lee as a child I remember the awe and excitement that I felt, staring up at walls of beautiful, sparkling guitars in an amazing variety of colours and styles, and walking through rows and rows of CDs and vinyl records of every genre you could think of. The store had everything a music lover could want or need, and, if they didn’t, the Wilsons would go above and beyond to get it for you.

Being at Wilson and Lee was always an experience, even if you were just dropping by for something quick and simple. The friendly, helpful, and fun atmosphere of the store felt like visiting a friend more than a store. However, that friendliness didn’t detract from the professionalism of Wilson and Lee in anyway. It’s likely that the fact that Bill Sr., Bill Jr., and Dave Wilson all dressed in suits and ties every single day of their careers lent itself to their air of trustworthiness and expertise.

I was always so excited to go to the music store with my dad for many reasons, but in no small part because at the end of every visit, Dave would lean across the counter, conspiratorially, and open his hand within which would lay nestled a guitar pick or little music themed eraser. For most of my childhood, I had a mason jar on my dresser that I added to after every visit with a new colourful, shiny, or sparkling music store trinket.

Sepia image of a truck loading a piano onto a front porch. The piano is covered in a sheet, and there are four people in the photograph
William George Wilson and Mary Lee receiving a piano at his home on Albert street. Photo from Wilson family collection. Image from: https://chronicle.durhamcollege.ca/2017/01/music-lives-wilson-lee/

The history of Wilson and Lee goes back long before my tiny feet crossed the threshold, but I am sure it had a similar impact on most of its customers over the nearly ten decades that it was in business. The store was opened in 1922 by William George Wilson and his sister-in-law Mary Lee and went on to be run by three generations of the Wilson family. Wilson and Lee had the distinction of being the longest running music store in all of Canada, having kept its doors open for an impressive 97 years. William came to Oshawa from Toronto to work at the Williams Piano Factory. William was blind and had trained at the CNIB (Canadian National Institute for the Blind) to be a piano tuner.

William and Mary’s partnership had its very early beginnings when she began to drive him from job to job tuning pianos in people’s homes. Through doing this, William realized a business opportunity, and he began to purchase, recondition, and resell pianos from his own home. However, as one can imagine, he quickly began to run out of room, at which point he and Mary opened the first location of Wilson and Lee. In the new store, William and Mary added player pianos and piano rolls, gramophones, and record players to their inventory.

Black and white photo of a storefront. The store sign reads "Wilson and Lee, Pianos, Gramaphones, Radios"
The storefront of Wilson and Lee’s first location in Oshawa. Photo from Wilson family collection. Myers, Jasper. Image from: https://chronicle.durhamcollege.ca/2018/12/oshawas-iconic-music-store-closes-in-on-century-mark/

William’s sons all joined in the family business early on. His eldest son, Bill Sr., started in 1933 before leaving to serve in the Second World War from 1939 to 1946. The next oldest brother, George, came to work in 1938, and youngest brother Ed joined the ranks in 1942 when their father passed away. Mary Lee continued to work alongside her nephews after William passed.

In 1953, the brothers bought the lot at 87 Simcoe St. N. and built the store where Wilson and Lee remained until 2019. The three brothers ran the store together until George’s retirement in 1989; at this time, the torch was passed to the next generation of Wilsons. Bill Sr.’s sons, Bill Jr. and Dave, had worked at Wilson and Lee since they were teenagers. Bill Jr. came to work as a high school student in 1953, while his younger brother Dave joined the family business in 1967 at 14 years old.

Colour photograph of a streetscape. On the left hand side, Wilson and Lee Music Store can be seen.
Simcoe St N at William St looking South late 1970s. Wilson and Lee can be seen at the left of the image. Oshawa Museum archival collection

In 1995, Ed Wilson retired, and in 2002, Bill Sr. hung up his hat – sort of. He would still come into the shop three times a week, in his suit and tie, to pick up his copy of Oshawa Weekly and maybe, just maybe, to check up on things. Bill Sr. was still calling his sons nine years after he retired to see if they needed his help down at the store. Bill Sr. passed away in July 2011 at the age of 94.

The Wilsons weathered the ebbs and flows of the economy over their ten decades in business, surviving the Great Depression, a World War, and numerous recessions. They showed great adaptability in their business model as the way we experience music changed so drastically throughout the 20th century.

Colour photograph of the exterior of Wilson and Lee Ltd. Music Store. There is a grey car outside the shop
Exterior of Wilson and Lee, c. 1986; Oshawa Museum archival collection

In the ’50s, the store installed six record booths so that customers could sample their records before making a purchase. They also made the shift from pianos as their big seller to accordions, banjos, violins, and of course the electric guitar as rock n’ roll music took off in the ’50s and ’60s. Other shifts they witnessed were 8transitions through the era of gramophones to records players, the brief competition between cassette tapes and 8-tracks, the advent of CDs, and the resurgence of vinyl records.

Bill Sr.’s sons stayed with the family business for eight more years before deciding to retire and close the doors to Wilson and Lee in December 2019. The brothers were honoured with a Lifetime Achievement Award and inducted into the Oshawa City Music Hall of Fame in April 2020, a wonderful acknowledgment by the community for the dedication of the Wilson family to modern quality products and service with a personal touch, which will be their lasting legacy in the story of Oshawa.


References

Carter, Adam. “One of Canada’s Oldest Music Stores Shutting down Just Shy of 100th Anniversary.” CBC News, September 15, 2019. Retrieved on November 9th, 2022 from https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/wilson-and-lee-music-closing-1.5284620    

Crimi, Crystal. “Saying Goodbye to a Long-Time Oshawa Businessman.” Oshawa Weekly, July 27, 2011. Retrieved on November 9th, 2022 from https://www.mykawartha.com/news-story/3452265-saying-goodbye-to-a-long-time-oshawa-businessman/

Myers, Jasper. “Oshawa’s Iconic Music Store Closes in on Century Mark.” The Chronicle. December 12, 2018. Retrieved on November 9th, 2022 from https://chronicle.durhamcollege.ca/2018/12/oshawas-iconic-music-store-closes-in-on-century-mark/

Szekely, Reka. “Music to Stop Playing at Oshawa’s Wilson and Lee after 97 Years.” Toronto Star, September 12, 2019. Retrieved on November 9th, 2022 from https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2019/09/12/music-to-stop-playing-at-oshawas-wilson-and-lee-after-97-years.html

Williams, Jared. “Music Lives on at Wilson & Lee.” The Chronicle. January 25, 2017. Retrieved on November 9th, 2022 from https://chronicle.durhamcollege.ca/2017/01/music-lives-wilson-lee/

YouTube. YouTube, 2020. Retrieved on November 9th, 2022 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VbiJILe8fI.   

The Month That Was – November 1917

Canadian Statesman, 4 Nov 1917, p. 5
Local and Otherwise
A Grand Masquerade Carnival will be held at the Oshawa Roller Rink next Tuesday night, Nov. 6th, See large bills for list of prizes. Doors Open at 7pm. Admission 25c, skates 10c extra.

Churches
The Jubilee services of Simcoe-st Methodist Church, Oshawa, on Sunday Oct. 21 will long be remembered as an event of great importance and interest.

Newspaper ad for the Military Service Act
Port Perry Star, 8 Nov 1917, p. 8

North Ontario Observer, 22 Nov 1917, p. 2
Union Mass Meeting
Wm. Smith, Esq., ex-MP Unaniously Nominated
Meeting Large and Enthusiastic

Whitby, Nov. 17 –  Nomination as Union candidate to represent South Ontario in the Dominion Parliament was offered to an accepted by William Smith, ex-PM (sic) for the riding, at a meeting called to choose a Union candidate, held in Whitby this afternoon. There was a large attendance made up of adherence to both political parties, and on the platform were men who in the past have been lively and even better opponents. F.L. Mason, Warden of the County, was chairman. The names in first nomination comprised almost as many liberals as conservatives, and were: William Smith, ex-MP, Columbus; FL Fowke, ex-MP, Oshawa; Dr TE Kaiser, Oshawa; Dr. Captain James Moore, Brooklin; George McLaughlin, Oshawa; Robert M Holtby, Manchester; Col. JF Grierson, Oshawa; Peter Christie, Manchester. All withdrew except Wm. Smith, and on motion of Dr. TE Kaiser and Col. JE Grierson, the nomination was unanimously offered to Mr. Smith, amid prolonged and enthusiastic applause.

Mr. Smith, in a kindly and amiable address, accepted the nomination and put himself up on record as in hearty accord with the principles the motives of the motives of the Union Government. He sympathized with those who were called upon to give up the sons to this awful struggle for human liberty, but there was no other way to in victory. The Military Service Act was inevitable when voluntary recruitment failed. He pledged his loyalty and hearty support to the union government, if elected.

Black and white photo of W.E.N. Sinclair, who was nominated as the Liberal Party Candidate in 1917
Port Perry Star, 22 Nov 1917, p. 1

Canadian Statesman, 29 Nov 1917, p. 2
Oshawa Boy Pays Price
Mr. A.A. Crowle, Oshawa, has received the following telegram:

“Deeply regret to inform you 745947 Pte. Delbert Crowle, Infantry, officially reported died of wounds, 44th Clearing Station, November 3, 1917, gunshot wound head.” Pte. Crowle enlisted with the 116th Ontario County Battalion. He went overseas on July 20, and reached France on 20th October, 1916. He was on active service until the 4th of May, 1917, when he was wounded. He was in England until September 1st, when he again returned to the firing line. Delbert was well known in Oshawa being born there 22 years ago, attended school, and was his father’s able assistant in the Luke Burial Company’s office when he enlisted. Capt. Garbutt, of Simcoe Street Methodist Church, held a memorial service Sunday evening to the memory of the deceased soldier.

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Local and Otherwise
Ernest Drinkle, Oshawa, was fined $5 for allowing his son to remain out of school. We see boys of school age too often on streets during school hours.

The Ontario Reformer, November 30, 1917, p. 4
The Late JO Henry

There passes away at his home on King St. east, Inst. Thursday afternoon, a member of a well known family in this County, in the person of Mr. James Orrin Henry.

He was one of the first exporters from Canada of apples to the British market, where his brand of fruit remained popular for many years. He was in his 86th year. As one of the pioneers of this locality, he had a large circle of acquaintances and many relatives.

He was the first of the twelve sons of the late Elder Thomas Henry, who was a local preacher of reputation 50 years ago. Elder Henry, along with Barton stone, founded the Christian Connection Church of Canada. Mr. Henry retired from his business 26 years ago. He is survived by two sons, Mr. EN Henry, who is a member of the Oshawa Exemption Tribunal, and Dr. Frank Henry, of Oshawa. He was a life-long Liberal and a Methodist. He was twice married. His first wife was a daughter of Samuel Hill, a pioneer of the district, and his second wife, Miss Carrie Major of Port Perry.

The funeral took place Saturday afternoon at 3:30 and was largely attended, interment taking place in Union Cemetery.

Note: James was the sixth of eleven sons for Thomas Henry, not fifth of twelve as reported.

Newspaper ad for Henderson Bros., New Linens for Xmas
Ontario Reformer, November 30, 1917 Page 12

The Ontario Reformer, November 30, 1917, p. 9
Archie Law Killed in Action
Word was received Wednesday morning of last week that Lance Corpl. Archie Law, one of Oshawa’s brightest and best known young men was “killed in action” on Oct. 30th. He enlisted in Montreal with the late Will Garrow, Will Bowden, Walter Hobday and Will French, in the Princess Patricias, and they went overseas Sept. 4th, 1915. He had not been wounded before, although he was in the hospital for a short time with a throat disease incurred by drinking bad water. All of these boys have been put out of the fight. Two have paid the supreme sacrifice. Will Bowden is a prisoner in Germany, Will French was wounded, and not being able to go back to the trenches, is being used as a bombing instructor in England. Walter Hobday returned to Canada incapacitated for further service a couple of months ago, bringing with him a bride from England.

Archie Law lived with his sister, Mrs. McAndrews, and father, William St. He also has five young brothers. His mother died when he was three years old, and was working for Luke Bros. when he enlisted. He was a member of Simcoe St. Church and S.S., and a good living boy who made friends wherever he went. He was expecting a six weeks’ leave to visit friends to Ireland at Xmas time.

Page number not specified
“Tanks” Pass Through Oshawa

On Tuesday afternoon the armoured tank, three armoured cars and the armoured motor cycle, which are being used in Canada in promoting the sale of Victory Loan Bonds, passed through Oshawa on the C.P.R. The tank, which is in charge of its own crew from the front, is like a huge tractor, and travels by means of two endless chains, on the caterpillar style. It is about 25 ft. long and about 10 ft. high. On account of the short notice given of their arrival but few were at the station to see them go through.

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