The Month That Was – October 1935

Canadian Statesman, 3 Oct 1935, p. 7
Social & Personal

The Statesman join sin tendering congratulations to Mr. JD Storie of Oshawa on the occasion of his 81st birthday on Sept 28. Mr Storie, who is an old Durham boy, was the largest donor toward the erection of the Nurses’ Home at Bowmanville Hospital.

A former Bowmanville boy, Fireman George Salter of Oshawa, has just completed 37 years active service with the Oshawa Fire Brigade. He has served under three fire chiefs, and has fought some of the most stubborn fires that have blazed in Oshawa during the present century. At the present time he is station man on the Oshawa Brigade.

Canadian Statesman, 24 Oct 1935, p. 2

Canadian Statesman, 17 Oct 1935, p. 1
Unique address heard at Rotary on Friday last
Col. Frank Chappell discusses the use and misuse of the English language in interesting talk

Both unique and delightfully presented was the address on Friday by Col. Frank Chappell, Public Relations Director of General Motors, Oshawa, at the Rotary Club. Col. Chappell made his address both educational and amusing. He was introduced by Rotarian Ross Strike and he spoke on the subject “Words and Phrases Common in the English Language.”

Most men, the speaker said, had a hobby of some sort, and the subject was something of an unconscious hobby of his own. Language he added, is said to be the clothing of our ideas and words the texture of our speech. The English language contains between 80 and 100 thousand words, and yet many of the greatest men only use a small proportion of this number. Shakespeare, who might be termed as the greatest literary genius of the ages, used no more than 5000 words, and yet with this number he was able to thrill the world with the beauty of his literary contributions. Such public men of today, as RB Bennett or Mackenzie King have vocabularies of probably 10,000 words.

The average working man, oddly enough, gets along with the use of about 200 words. There is nothing highbrow, Col. Chappell said, in using well rounded speech. There is not such so much beauty in human expression as there was in other days, and yet colour and style belonged to all of us for our own use.

Slang was used a great deal to put emphasis on expression, but too much use of slang tended to spoil the language…

The speaker believed there should be a little more originality in speech. He deplored the use of words spelled backwards as names, and two instances of this recited. Canada, spelled backwards, Adanac, was used a great deal as a trade name, but it lacked the beauty and the meaning that is in the word Canada. Recently he came across an apartment house called Rolyat and upon investigation found that it was the owners name, Taylor, spelled backwards.

Practically all names have an origin in a trade or profession or characteristics. Strong men, denotes a characteristic, whereas such names as Bowman, denote art…

Oshawa Daily Times, 28 Oct 1935

Canadian Statesman, 24 Oct 1935, p. 7
In the Dim and Distant Past
Twenty-Five Years Ago, from the Bowmanville News, October 21, 1010

Rev. and Mrs. J Garbutt, Mrs FA Haddy, Mrs BM Warnica, Mrs LA Tole, Miss Annie Cryderman are delegates to the Provicincial Sunday School convention in Oshawa

Mr. Percy Piper of this town won 2nd prize for the best costume at the grand masquerade at Oshawa Roller Rink on Thursday.

Oshawa Daily Times, 28 Oct 1935
Aged Resident Died at Harmony Sunday Morning
Mrs. JL McGill was born here 83 years ago

Mrs. John L. McGill, a lifetime resident of Oshawa and district, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. H Willson, Harmony, yesterday morning. Mrs. McGill had been in ill health for the past three months, but had only been confined to bed for the past few weeks.

Mrs. McGill, whose maiden name was Jennie Lorenda Henry, was born in the old Henry homestead, Oshawa-on-the-Lake, 83 years ago. After her marriage to Mr. McGill they moved to the McGill homestead in East Whitby, where they lived for a number of years. For more than 25 years, Mrs. McGill had been living at 102 Agnes St.

Mrs. McGill was a member of Centre Street United Church, formerly the Christian Church. It was largely through the efforts of her father, Elder Thomas Henry, that the Christian Church was established in Oshawa. She was a member of the Women’s Association of that church, and had been an active member and convener of a group until the past year prevented her from taking a very active part.

Predeceased by her husband 12 years ago and by her only son, Orvill McGill of St. Catharines, 11 years ago, two daughters, Mrs. H Willson Ann Mrs. CI DeGuerre, remain. There are ten grandchildren and nine great grandchildren. Mrs. McGill was the last member of her family, the last of 16 children.

The funeral will be held from the home of her daughter, Mrs. H Willson, Harmony at 2:30 o’clock on Tuesday afternoon. Rev. WP Fletcher, former pastor of Centre Street Church, will officiate assisted by Rev. GCR McQuade. Interment will be made in the Union Cemetery.

Oshawa Daily Times, 28 Oct 1935

Oshawa Daily Times, 28 Oct 1935
Relief Lists Continue to  Grow Smaller in Oshawa
Number on Relief Reached the Lowest Point Here Today Since 1930 – Board Hopes to Complete Year Without and Overdraft

The reduction in the number of families on relief in the city of Oshawa continues at a very gratifying rate, and the figures issued this morning by Relief Administrator J. C. McGill, indicate that the situation is more satisfactory than it has been at any time since relief on a large scale became necessary in this city. This morning, the number of families on relief had dropped to 662, this being the lowest figure recorded at this date since the year 1930. Since the meeting of the Public Welfare Board on October 9, the number of families on relief has decreased by 79, the figure on that date being 741 families. This reduction is entirely due to families becoming self-supporting by reason of the wage earner going back to work.

A year ago, on the same date there were 813 families on relief, and the number was increasing rapidly, in contrast to the present condition of almost daily reductions. In 1933, there were almost 1,202 families on relief on October 28, and the number was also increasing steadily in that year.

These figures show the very satisfactory position of the relief situation today, as compared with previous years, and Mr. McGill is very hopeful that the present decreases will continue, and will effect a very considerable reduction in relief costs for the balance of this year and the early months of next year. It is just possible that, by reason of the fewer families on relief, the welfare board will be able to finish the year without an overdraft on the budget set aside for it for the year of 1935, which would be a considerable reduction from the total costs in 1934.

Canadian Statesman, 31 Oct 1935, p. 3

Oshawa Daily Times, 28 Oct 1935, p. 6
Harbor Deserted

Oshawa Harbor at the present time presents rather a sererted appearabce. All the small pleasure craft, that during the summer season swung at their moorings, have been removed to winter quarters. The only craft remaining is the crusier “Harry H.” which is moored at the north side of the turning basin.

Canadian Statesman, 31 Oct 1935, p. 7
Holy Trinity AYPA of Oshawa were guests on Monday night of St. John’s AYPA at a Hollowe’en masquerade in the Parish Hall. Eric Colwell won the prize for the most original costume, Russel Hatherly of Oshawa for the comic, and an Oshawa girl for the prettiest costime. The hall was gaily decorated for the event, and about 75 young people attended.

Whitby Gazette and Chronicle, 31 Oct 1935, p. 9

Whitby Gazette and Chronicle, 31 Oct 1935, p. 7
Raglan

Plans are being made for a Hallowe’en masquerade in the hall on Thursday evening. The school children are preparing entertainment and are inviting the ladies to help provide. Everyone is cordially invited.

Reflections from a Summer Student

By Grace A., Summer Student

I spent the majority of my summer at the Oshawa Museum researching the city’s early Jewish community. As Jennifer Weymark shared in her post, this project aligns with the greater plan to compile the stories that have not yet been told in our local histories. As she wrote, there has been a summer student (that’s me) sifting through census records, newspaper articles and other primary source documents, trying to piece it all together. In the beginning, I delved into the 1921 Census of Canada, looking for families in Oshawa who identified as Hebrew. I recorded names, birthdates, countries of origin, dates of immigration, language, and occupation. Using this information, I went to the Oshawa City Directory from the same year to get a little more personal. I found out which houses they lived in and the businesses they may have owned. I have to admit, I felt a little invasive. Everything I looked through was public record, but I couldn’t help but wonder what they would think and whether they would have approved of me playing private investigator.

The idea of informed consent was developed in the medical and biomedical community during the 1950s. While the concept has evolved over time, it’s rooted in the belief that there should be a process of communication between the physician and patient. To simplify it, the patient has to be fully aware of what they’re getting into before they receive treatment. Conversations about research ethics over the last few decades have been influenced by the basic notion of informed consent. For example, Karen L. Potts and Leslie Brown talk about informed consent in their essay titled “Becoming an Anti-Oppressive Researcher.” In their words, informed consent “highlights our commitment to the community, our relationships to it, the data, and the process.” These processes become complicated when you’re researching past communities. Most of the time, there is no opportunity to have an open dialogue between the researcher and subject in historical studies.

Ontario Jewish Archives, 1976-6-8

This summer, I learned that in the absence of this relationship there are still ways that museums can commit themselves to anti-oppressive research. On this project, we had many conversations about the archive. This is a particularly important consideration for a research project about the early Jewish community in Oshawa. During the time periods we studied, Jewish people in Canada faced anti-Semitism and experienced a great deal of adversity as a result of colonial violence. This considered, we have to be aware of how these structures are embedded in archived material. The Ontario Jewish Archives was immensely helpful both as a source of reliable information and a partner on this project. The photograph above is from their collection, and shows a group of Oshawa children and a Rabbi at a Cheder class from 1925. “Cheder Class” was one of many photographs from the OJA’s collection which helped to visualize the history of the early Jewish community.


Sources

Research As Resistance, Second Edition: Revisiting Critical, Indigenous, and Anti-Oppressive Approaches, edited by Leslie Brown, and Susan Strega, Canadian Scholars, 2015. ProQuest Ebook Central, https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.proxy.queensu.ca/lib/queen-ebooks/detail.action?docID=6282047.

The Month That Was – September 1931

Vaudeville Revue for Grand Stand To Be Best Ever
Tuesday, September 15th, 1931 – The Oshawa Daily Times

The directors of the Oshawa Fair have gone to great lengths this year to secure entertainment of the highest calibre for the big exhibition which opens to the public tomorrow. The free entertainment which is being provided in front of the grand stand, in particular, will surpass anything formerly offered at the Oshawa Fair. Every afternoon and evening, in addition to the band concerts which are always popular at the Oshawa Fair, there will be vaudeville acts by outstanding artists and a musical revue which will be even greater than that which was presented last year. This musical revue, known as Webb’s Passing Parade Revue, is coming here for the third consecutive year, and it is announced as the biggest grand stand attraction ever seen in Oshawa. Many startling sensations in the way of special acts, with beautiful girls presenting singing and dancing numbers, and funny comedians keeping the ground in good humour, will be included in the program.

One of the main features of the revue will be the Great Lakes All Girls Orchestra, a musical organization of girls who have won a splendid reputation for themselves as musicians who can really play the best of music. The Resee Sisters, clever dancers, Mack and Sullivan, dancers and Singers, and other well-known entertainers will have a place on the program of the grand stand show, which is expected to pack the grand stand on both afternoons and evenings.

Port Perry Star, 17 Sep 1931, p. 5

Horse Race Revival at Oshawa Fair
Tuesday, September 15th, 1931 – The Oshawa Daily Times

After a year’s absence from the program of Oshawa Fair, this year’s Fair will see a revival of that popular sport harness racing, with some of the fastest trotters and pacers in the Dominion taking part in the trials of speed on Wednesday and Thursday afternoon. To make this revival of horse racing a success, the directors in charge have scoured the country to secure the entries of the best horses that could be lined up to compete, and each afternoon there will be two fast events, with handsome purses offered, and with the best three of five heats to count. The people of Oshawa and district showed in July that they were willing to support good horse racing, and so the Fair directors have tried to get the very best to satisfy that demand. Already many fast horses are on the ground, and have been showing their places on the race track, so that a large entry is assured in each of the four events which will feature the grand stand program for the Fair.

Storm Sewer Progresses
Wednesday, September 16th, 1931 – The Oshawa Daily Times

Construction of a new section of storm sewer on Simcoe Street, from Bagot to King is proceeding at a good pace and is providing work for about 25 men who would otherwise be unemployed. The new storm sewer has been laid for a distance of about one block and excavation work is now proceeding in the second block.

Canadian Statesman, 10 Sep 1931, p. 5

Subway Work Going Ahead
Wednesday, September 16th, 1931 – The Oshawa Daily Times

The paving work undertaken by the city’s Board of Works at the C.N.R. Subway on Simcoe Street South is progressing rapidly, while preparations for the laying of the lines of the Street Railway Company is also nearing completion. The present road, especially the approach to the railway crossing, is in a terrible condition and in its present state is a menace to the safety of all vehicles.

Mayor In Toronto
Wednesday, September 16th, 1931 – The Oshawa Daily Times

Mayor Ernie Marks was in Toronto today in connection with a meeting of the Associated Theatres organization of which he is president.

Grounds Beautiful
Wednesday, September 16th, 1931 – The Oshawa Daily Times

The fine appearance of the grounds at the Ritson Road Public School has been the subject of much favourable comment this fall. By means of well laid out flower beds and shrubbery the caretaker has greatly beautified the school surroundings.

Rides Were Popular
Friday, September 18th, 1931 – The Oshawa Daily Times

The ferris wheel, merry-go-round, whip and aerial swing did a rushing business in the Oshawa Fair midway last night. All these rides seemed popular with the large crowds which thronged the midway.

Repairing Silo
Saturday, September 19th, 1931 – The Oshawa Daily Times

Work of re-conditioning the silo at the City Farm, which was scorched in the recent fire which destroyed the farm barn with its contents, has been commenced. The silo was note very badly damages but on examination cracks and other faults were found in the concrete caused by the excessive heat from the flames.

Constructed Freight Platform
Saturday, September 19th, 1931 – The Oshawa Daily Times

In addition to the new freight shed which was recently turned over to the city by the Department of Public Works at the local Harbour, a lengthy substantial platform has been erected as an approach to the shed on the wharf side to facilitate the handling of freight.

How Visual Art Can Help Narrate History

By Jessica R., Summer Student

As I come to the end of my summer job at the Oshawa Museum, I’m grateful I had the opportunity to apply what I have learned in university into real life research projects. I believe that the strongest take-away from my personal projects at the museum is the idea that we form our perspectives of history in relation to the evidence and research we view. I learned that there is a surprisingly strong co-dependency between literary history and visual art during each era. It seems self-explanatory for someone who is regularly involved with historic research. But for me, having this first-time experience to see the value of artefacts, architecture, and visual art was exciting. Art in any genre or style is usually focused on its aesthetic value, such as the art style, colours, or perspective. But no matter how abstract or grand the art piece is, it will always contain historical evidence of some sort.

I was assigned to work on uncovering and researching the backstory and meanings behind historical paintings and drawings by the late Canadian artist, ES Shrapnel. The process to find the history behind the paintings was fairly difficult at times. But I found through my research that combining the written information I found with my own examination of the art style and colours in the sketches added the missing pieces of information I needed to finish the background information or support the visualization of the author’s ideas. Besides being an excellent primary source of information, the prints I examined were also good examples of the trends within local artists of that time, and it showed how society was progressing in terms of art styles. I noticed that ES Shrapnel promoted his talents often in the Whitby Chronicle, saying he would hold lessons for anyone who was interested. The community was then able to create art which reflected the narrative of their own lives at the time because of artists like Shrapnel who encouraged this participation. Shrapnel’s networking abilities are still seen today using different, modern technological ways. As we draw parallels with today’s society, we can appreciate that this was one of the many ways that visual art can continue to have historic usefulness.

Whitby Chronicle, November 4, 1880, Page 03.

In general, visual art is a core aspect engrained in everyone’s culture, lifestyle, and community. I appreciate that it gives an additional view on historic communities that did not rely on written literature to depict their stories or actions. Visual art gives historians and researchers an opportunity to expand their knowledge and help us understand in our modern perspective how people co-existed with one another through history. I find the universal understanding of art in history helps expand the ideas of written language and can narrate a scene of moments that were never documented in words.

In conclusion, throughout my time at the Oshawa Museum, I felt greatly satisfied and fulfilled seeing local artists from our community contributing strong and impactful sources of information simply through visual art. With my research of the ES Shrapnel prints, it gave me a newfound appreciation for the artist and others of his time for their dedication to their passions. The beauty of visual art grows deeper than just the material used, but more with their significance in writing history. Visual art gives metaphorical colour to the incomplete paintings of society and its ideas. I hope that people in our community continue to keep making art, regardless of it pertaining to the landscape of our area, as it gives a glimpse of the artistic minds within in our community.

The Month That Was – August 1862

All articles originally appeared in The Oshawa Vindicator

August 6, 1862, Page 01
Petroleum
Experiment to Determine its Comparative Illuminating Power with Gas and Candles
(From the Scientific American)

It is not the difference in price per gallon between two burning fluids, or other agents employed in artificial illumination, that determines their respective cost for use. One burning fluid, such as a mixture of alcohol and turpentine, that costs only sixty cents per gallon, may be more expensive than sperm oil costing one dollar and a quarter; because the latter possesses three times the illuminating power of the former. It is well known that refined petroleum has lately driven all other burning fluids out of use, and one reason for this is its very low price. But, as we have already stated, this cannot determine its economy- its comparative illuminating power must also be known, to form a just estimate of its cost. Heretofore this has been unknown, but now we have a most valuable contribution to science in the record of a series of experiments conducted by Professor James. C. Booth, and Mr. Thomas H. Garret, of Philadelphia, and published in a later number of the Journal of the Franklin Institute.

Page 02
The War
 Memphis, July 28

Gen. Grant has ordered Gen. Sherman to take possession of all unoccupied dwellings, stores and manufactories for the Government, and also where the owners are absent rebels, to collect their rents for the Government. The Military Commissions has commenced taking a list.

The guerillas captured prominent citizens of Haywood county on Saturday, for selling cotton. One was shot dead while attempting to escape. The rest were taken to Mississippi.

Price has got 25 cannon across the Mississippi near Napoleon, and is endeavoring to cross his whole army. The rebels say Price is command Missouri, Hindman, Arkansas, and Magruder to be over both. The Union forces are ample to check them.

Washington, July 30

There is a report hero through contraband sources to the effect that large bodies of rebel troops are crossing the James River, South. The contrabands say they are evacuating Richmond.

Paris, Ky., July 30.

Yesterday a party of over 200 guerillas from Boone County under Col. Bullet, demanded the surrender of Mount Sterling, Ky. This being refused they attached the place but were repulsed by the Home Guards. During the retreat, the guerrillas were met by a party of the 8th Kentucky Volunteers under command of Major Braclit, who drove them back towards the town where they were again attacked by the Home Guards. The result was a complete stampede of the guerillas who lost all their horses, 8 killed and 48 taken prisoners. The number of wounded is not known.

Cairo, July 30.

The steamer “Platte Valley,” from Memphis, brings the news of the capture of the despatch boat “Sallie Wood,” by rebels 150 miles above Vicksburg. The rebels had a masked battery and succeeded in hitting her steampipe, disabling her. They took quite a number of prisoners and destroyed the boat. The “Queen of the West” was also fired into on her way up. Two or three were killed and several wounded.

Oshawa Grammar School
This institution proceeds with its fall session on Monday the 11th inst., and will, for the future, be carried on in the old English Church, near the western limits of the corporation. The Court House, where it had been located for the at six months, was found a very inconvenient place, owing to the proximity of the lock-up., and the interference with studies caused by taking prisoners through the school room. We are gratified to learn that our Grammar School gives promise of success in the hands of Professor Lunsden, to which success the move to the Church building will add materially.

The Temperance Society
The meeting on Friday evening last, for the appointment of Officers of the above mentioned Society, was not so largely attended as it ought to have been. The following chief officers were appointed:

President, A. Farewell, Esq.,
Secretary, P. Thornton,
Treasurer, C. R. Cook.

Very little other business was transacted, except to make arrangements for the next meeting, which, it was decided, should be held on the evening of Friday the 15th inst. It is expected that Rev. J. Smith, of Bowmanville, will be present and speak at next meeting. At the close of the lecture, some further arrangements for the enlargement and success of the Society will be made.

Page 03
Oshawa Shoe Factory

Oshawa, through the enterprise and liberality of her chief citizens, is becoming celebrated for manufacturers of various kinds. Among these is the shoe factory of Messrs. Thompson & French. This establishment was commenced in December last, with a few hands and two machines. The proprietors are both practical men; Mr. Thompson being thoroughly acquainted with the leather trade, having previously been engaged in the tanning business; and Mr. French is one of the first manufacturing hands in the Province. -They have all the machinery and conveniences necessary to a large business, which is steadily on the increase.

August 6, 1862, Page 014

August 13, 1862, Page 01
Drugs and Dysentery in the Army

One of our friends writing from the army, says: – “We have a number of sick in our division; their disease is principally diarrhea and intermittent fever, and the worst of it is, that all the drugs in God’s kingdom won’t cure them. I have had some experience in that line, having been hospital steward for the last six months; and I am fully convinced that if they would throw away their medicines and adopt the Water-Cure, the Grand Army of the Potomac would be better able to cope with traitors, because of the health of the men.”

There is truth in this. We have never seen a case of diarrhea that would not succumb to the syringe; and drugs produce intermittent fever instead of curing it.

The Tribe Prize Strawberries
From personal inquiries, and from letters and comments of the press, we judge that a little explanation is necessary. In the first place, we fully believe all that has been stated about the good qualities of these new seedling strawberries, not only from the repeated reports of competent and entirely disinterested gentlemen acting as judges, but from actual observations of the growth of the plants at many different times, and testing of the quality of the fruit by our own taste, year after year, when we had no idea of giving them to the subscribes of The Tribune.

Page 03
Enticing to Desert

The Captain and Mate of the City of Madison, a schooner plying between Toronto ad Oswege, and principally owned by Messrs. F. W. Cumberland and Lewis F. Grant, of the Northern Railway of Canada, have been committed to stand their trial at the ensuing Assizes, on a charge of enticing British soldiers to desert. It became known that several missing men of the 30th regiment, stationed at Toronto, had reached the United States by this schooner, and on four more being missed on Wednesday last, it was determined to search the vessel. The result was the finding of the four men secreted in the hold. The schooner was to have sailed in the evening. The Captain and Mate, who are Americans, and four other hands, were taken into custody, and examined at the Police Court.

August 13, 1862, Page 03

August 20, 1862 Page 01
Fruit as Medicine

The present year promises to be an excellent fruit year, and if so, we may congratulate the public on the prospect. Ripe fruit is the medicine of nature. Nothing could be more wholesome for men or child, and altho’ green fruit is, of course, almost as fatal as so much poison, the ripe is fully as thorough a health restorer and health preserver. Strawberries are certainly abundant in this direction, and have been for a long time. They are quite cheap, and being a favorite with all classes, constitute a popular luxury. But who can compute the amount of general health promoted by this relish for strawberries? Who can imagine how many pills that relish throws out of the market; or, in other words, to what extent that pills prepared by Mother Nature and sugar-coated, as it were, to render them more palatable, crowd out of use those prepared by the chemist and apothecary?

Page 02
Arrival of THE GLASGLOW
Cape Race, Aug. 15.

The steamship Glasglow, from Liverpool, on Wednesday the 6th, via Queenstown 7th inst., passed Cape Race at 3:30 p.m. to-day, en route to New York. She was boarded by the Press yacht, and her news obtained.

The steamship Norweigan from Quebec, arrived at Londonderry on the 5th.

The steamship Great Eastern, from New York, was off Queenstown on the 5th.

The City of New York, from New York, arrived at Queenstown on the 6th.

Page 03
The New Comet

Within the past few evenings an object of unusual interest has made its appearance in the northern portion of the heavens, and has been noted with interest by several of our citizens. It is the second comet of 1862, discovered first by Prof. Tuttle, of the Cambridge, U.S. observatory, on the night of the 18th of July last, but now first apparent to the naked eye. Its distance from the polar star is about eight degrees, being on a line with the two “pointers” of the “plough,” from the neared of which it is distant about twice as far as the pole. It is also on a line with the two principal stars in the body of the Little Bear. In brilliancy it resembles a star of the third magnitude, but when examined closely has a hazy appearance; while the tail may be with difficulty perceived streaming nearly in the direction of the pole.

Diseased Cattle
In the report issued by the Registrar-General of Scotland, he calls the attention of the public to the fact that ever since pleuropneumonia broke out among cattle of this country, a few years since, the returns of mortality show that carbuncle, a disease formerly very rare, had become comparatively common. Dr. Livingstone observed in Africa that if the flesh of animals which die from pleuropneumonia is eaten, it causes carbuncle in the persons who eat it, and that neither boiling nor roasting the flesh, nor cooking it in any way, gets rid of the poison. It is true that if such cattle are ever sold for food they are killed before they fall victims to the disease naturally, but still the poison is in them. The report suggests, as a subject for inquiry, whether the new form of disease which we term diphtheria may not be partially induced by the use of diseased flesh.

August 26, 1862, Page 01
The War
Washington, Aug. 20.

A special despatch to the Times says that Mr. Stanton stated today that the order for drafting to fill up the old regiments would be enforced without fail by the 1st of September. The old regiments which have not been recruited up to the full strength before that time, will be filled by draft.

Sedalia, Mo, Aug. 20.

Advices from the west are to the effect that the Confederate forces under Coffee, Quantrel, Cockwell, Tracy and others which were lately menacing Lexington, are in full retreat southward. – They are 4,00 strong and have 2 spiked cannon, captured from Major Foster, at Lone Jack on Friday last.

Nashville, Aug. 20.

Col. Hefferon, of the 15th Indiana Regiment, proceeded to Gallatin to-day without orders, with a force of 250, who had been posted at a bridge. He made a number of arrests of civilians. While Col. Hefferon’s party were gone on this expedition, the guerrillas burned the bridge. He made a number of arrests of civilians. While Col. Hefferon’s party were gone on this expedition, the guerrillas burned the bridge at Landorsville, and captured 14 men.

House Burned
The frame dwelling house of Mr. Robert Karr, on the Reach Road, about four miles north of Oshawa, was totally consumed by fire on the afternoon of Friday last. At the time of the accident no person was in or about the premises, Mr. Karr being at work in the harvest field on an adjoining lot, and Mrs. Karr having about half an hour previously gone up to her father’s – Mr. James Shand. The first alarm was given by a number of small children who were on their way home from school.

August 26, 1862, Page 04