The Month That Was – October 1862

All stories were reported in the Oshawa Vindicator.

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October 1, 1862, Page 2

The War
Washington, Sept 26 – The governors of the following states arrived here this morning from Altoona, OA, viz: Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Michigan, New Hampshire, Indiana.

The last named (Indiana) was represented by Col. Rose.

Between 12 and one o’clock the governors of the states above named had an interview of an official character with President Lincoln…

The governors were courteously and kindly received, and their suggestions listened to with close attention by the President.

It is ascertained from those who had the best opportunities for knowing that there was no proposition made at the recent conference at Altoona, nor even a suggestion ventured, touching the removal of General McClellan, or was any proposition of suggestion made as to the promotion of General Fremont to the head of the army, or as to the future disposal of that gentleman.

 

Cincinnati, Sept 29 – Gen. Jefferson C. Davis shot Gen. Nelson at the Galt House, Louisville, this morning, killing him almost instantly

All business was totally suspended in this city yesterday, from 2 till 5pm, all the citizens being under drill. The turn-out was large.

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Hall’s Factory Burned!
It becomes our painful duty to announce the total demolition of the well-known Woollen Factory owned by Mr. Samuel Hall, located just north of Oshawa, and occupied by Mr. Geo. Brook.  It took fire it is not known how, near midnight on Monday evening, and in short time the building, and all the valuable stock and machinery, were reduced to a heap of ashes and smoking ruins.  Two men or horse-back were sent to Oshawa to give the alarm, and the fire engine and a lot of the men went out and did good service in assisting to save the property in the neighbourhood of the factory from the devouring element.

We learn that Mr. Hall had an insurance for $7,000 on the building, and the stick and machinery was insured in about $4,000.

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October 15, 1862, Page 1

To Abolish Fruit Stealing
As we grow older (and more charitable?) we are the more included to imagine that the stealing of fruit springs from an ignorant, heedless sportiveness, rather than from deliberate wickedness.  They who steal have never learned how much time and labor it costs to raise fruit; and seeing it in tempting plentifulness around, they think it can harm nobody very much if they take a little.  We do not justify this, nor do we depreciate the use of legal suasion at times; but would not a little moral influence and tact also be well? –American Agriculturalist

 

October 15, 1862, Page 2

Reception of Lord Monck at Whitby
Whitby, Oct 6th, 1862
The passage of His Excellency the Governor General through Whitby was seized upon by the laymen of the town and county as a suitable opportunist for the display of their attachment to the Mother Country, and their gratification at the assumption of the government of the Province by the present popular representative of Royalty. It became known that Lord Monck should be at the Whitby Station about one o’clock pm, and for some time before that hour men, women, and children began to wend their way thither.  A platform had been erected for His Excellency’s reception, with a canopy which was decorated with evergreens; a large motto proclaimed “welcome” to His Excellency, and several flags added to the gaiety of the scene. The Stouffville Brass Band discoursed sweet music before and during His Excellency’s stay. About a thousand persons were present, many of htem leading men from different parts of the County.

 

October 22, 1862, Page 2

Sudden Death
On Wednesday last, Mr. Daniel Robinson, living on lot No. 2 in the 9th Concession of East Whitby, came to Oshawa with a load of wheat. When within 2 ½ miles of his home, in returning, he was taken with terrible pains in his breast and stomach, and turned into the house of his brother-in-law, Mr. John McCullough.  As his condition did not improve, his wife was sent for, and on the following evening, sad to relate, his sufferings were relieved by death. He was a steady and industrious man of about 40 years of age, and leaves a wife and family to mourn over their sudden bereavement of their chief dependence and mainstay in life.

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Union Cemetery’s Mausoleum

This article originally appeared in The Oshawa Daily Times, August 11, 1928. It has been supplemented with contemporary images, taken by curator Melissa Cole in 2016 (unless otherwise noted).

Like a beautiful chapel dedicated to sainted memories and undying affection, the Oshawa Mausoleum in the Union Cemetery invites the reverent glance of all who pass into or out of Oshawa on the westward approach of the Kingston Highway.

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(l): 1928, Oshawa Daily Times; (r) 2013, Oshawa Museum Oshawa Museum photograph

That noble structure is an essay in stone upon the beauty rather than the grimness of death. Sheltering within its stately corridors the remains of Oshawa citizens whose lives helped to shape its destinies, it stands a firm defiance against the ravages of time and mortal mutability.

The building of stately mausoleums in Ontario has been one of the significant phases of life following the late great war.  Many hearts torn by the tragedies of battlefields, where, at the best, loved ones have been left to keep eternal vigil on the field of their last supreme sacrifice, and where, at worst, stones which carry the poignant reminder that underneath lies one “Known to God” tell of those who gave even their identity in the battle for freedom, thoughtful men and women have turned with a sense of relief to the steadfast security and permanence of mausoleum interment for their loved ones.

The Canada Mausoleums, Ltd., with head offices in the Metropolitan Building, Adelaide and Victoria Street, Toronto, has rendered a splendid service to Canadians by fostering the erection of such beautiful structures as that which adorns the Union Cemetery. …

Floor Plan Oshawa Mausoleum

Oshawa’s mausoleum is built in an adaption of Egypto-Roman architecture.  Its chief beauty is that of line and mass, enhanced by the facade’s central arch which is as impressive as it is beautiful, and typifies the Christian belief that death itself is but a gateway to immortal happiness. The exterior is of cut Indiana limestone. Massive bronze doors open on the vestibule and central chapel at one end of which a window of beautiful stained glass, carrying its pictured message of comfort and hope, throws a jewelled arabesque of light upon the Wallace sandstone, bordered by black and green Missisquoi marble, which forms the floor of chapel and crypt inside.

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Two aisles, north and south with the building’s greater dimension, lined with the 310 permanent crypts, all but a small percentage of which are owned by local and district families.

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Oshawa Museum photograph

 

At either end of the crypt corridors are private chapels, separated from the corridors by bronze gates, which are owned by prominent Oshawa families.

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An important feature of the Oshawa mausoleum is that the basement contains forty-two crypts forming the Union Cemetery’s receiving vault for winter use. …

Union Cemetery’s many solemn beauties are enhanced by the Mausoleum, near which is the group of graves which closely resemble the war cemeteries of Canadian heroes who died in France. These graves are all headed with the Imperial War Graves’ headstones, and a central monument commemorates the sacrifices of those who, though living to return home, yet succumbed to the actual wounds or disabilities incident to service overseas.

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Oshawa Museum photograph

 


Scenes FB

Discover the stories of Oshawa’s Union Cemetery like never before. Actors bring history to life in Scenes from the Cemetery, a dramatic tour through Oshawa’s history.

Last year’s popular event returns with a look at Canada’s 150th! On Saturday September 9 and Sunday September 10, take a tour through Oshawa’s Union Cemetery with the dramatic tour Scenes from the Cemetery. On this walking tour, actors will bring stories to life, portraying people from Oshawa’s past, celebrating these exceptional individuals and how their actions led to Canada’s genesis and growth.

The event runs on Saturday September 9 and Sunday September 10, 2017; Show start times: 2pm; 2:20pm; 2:40pm; 3pm

Tickets are $20 each; tickets can be purchased in person at Guy House or online https://scenesfromthecemetery.com/tickets/

The Month That Was – September 1929

The Month That Was – September 1929
The Oshawa Daily Times
Governor-General to Visit Oshawa on September 16
Edition 04 September 1929

Viscount Willingdon, Governor-General of Canada, will pay an official visit to Oshawa on Monday, September 16, the city council was informed at its meeting last night. A special committee has been named to make arrangement for the civic reception to the Governor-General.

On his official visit, Viscount Willingdon will be accompanied by Vis-countess Willingdon and by several members of his staff, the official communication received by the council stated. The party will arrive at the Canadian National depot by special train at 10 o’clock Daylight Saving time, Monday morning, and from 10 o’clock to noon will be entertained by the city. At noon Viscount Willingdon will be the guest of R. S. McLaughlin at luncheon at Parkwood, and in the afternoon will make a tour of the local plants of General Motors.

 

The Oshawa Daily Times
Helped Him
Edition 04 September 1929

“You know, Dad, he always said he’d never marry until the right girl came along.”
“Well, how does he know you are the right one?”
“Oh, I told him I was.”

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The Oshawa Daily Times
GOODYEAR ‘BLIMP’ VISITED OSHAWA THIS AFTERNOON
Edition 04 September 1929

Took Series of Motion Pictures and Photos from the Air

Oshawa was visited this afternoon by the dirigible of the Goodyear Tire Company, the now well-known “blimp” coming on here from the Canadian National Exhibition, where it was taking part in today’s air circus. On board the dirigible was a party of photographers and camera men, who took a series of still and motion pictures of the General Motors plant as seen from the air. After circling over the city for a short time, the big airship turned round and returned to Toronto, where it is making its headquarters for the next few days. The pictures taken from the air today are to be used in Chevrolet sales promotion work throughout Canada in the near future.

 

The Oshawa Daily Times
DRUG TRAFFICKERS HAVE MANY TRICKS
Edition 04 September 1929

CARRIER PIGEONS USED TO TRANSPORT SUPPLIES OF DOPE

New Methods- Many Private Houses Are in the Guise of Clubs

Montreal – Behind closed doors and heavily curtained windows bogus West End night clubs are again selling liquor after hours and catering for drug addicts.

Following certain rumors of their renewed activities, I determined to find what really was happening in the West End, which after midnight is supposed to be drinkless. But the new proprietors are cautious – newcomers are not welcomed as in the old days.

 

The Oshawa Daily Times
New G. M. C. Building for Oshawa
Edition 07 September 1929

ERECTION OF NEW PARTS AND SERVICE BUILDING TO START IN TWO WEEKS

Wrecking of Three Houses on Site of New Building, Bond and Mary Streets, Has Already Started – Tenders Close Next Friday on the Building

H. A. Brown, General Manager of G. M. C. of Canada, Announces That Unit Will Probably Be Completed About January 1

A new parts and service building will be erected immediately by General Motors of Canada, Limited, it was announced this morning by H. A. Brown, vice-president and general manager of the company. The building will be erected on the north-east corner of Bond and Mary streets, immediately west of the present parts and service building.

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Pictured from left to right: John H. Beaton, general sales manager of General Motors of Canada; Geo. E. Amsely, sales manager of McLaughlin-Buick Motor Car Co.; H. A. Brown, vice-president and general manager of General Motors of Canada; Charles H. Ricketta, manager of the McLaughlin-Buick factory branch in Toronto; and R. S. McLaughlin, president of General Motors of Canada.

The Oshawa Daily Times
Highest Award for Local Poultryman
Edition 07 September 1929

John Thomas Wins Grand Championship Prize at C. N. E.

Whitby, Sept. 7. – The grand championship for the finest bird on display at the poultry show of the Canadian National Exhibition has been awarded to a barred rock cockerel owned by Constable John Thomas of the Whitby police force. This year constable Thomas displayed ten chickens at the poultry show and besides the high honor mentioned above his chickens have been awarded three first and two second prizes and the challenge shield for the best display of barred rocks.

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The Oshawa Daily Times
FIREMEN ROUTE ANGRY HORNETS
Edition 07 September 1929

Insects Were Attacking Pedestrians on Centre Street

“How doth the bust bee improve each shining hour?” is a question asked in a familiar ditty which was answered yesterday for local people by a number of hornets, which if not bees, may be at least regarded as near relatives. These particular hornets had built a nest in a tree in fornt of the residence of Dr. C. E. Wilson, Centre street, and they knew how to improve each shinning hour. Individual members of the colony took great delight in bussing down from the nest and attacking pedestrians as they passed along the street. The infirm, the aged and the very young were not spared and it was remarkable the impetus which pedestrian traffic received through the application of a few hornet stings. They did not complain to the police but laid their troubles before the fire department.

The local brigade is called upon to do many unusual things even though there are no Doukabhors in Oshawa who may require a soaking with streams from a fire hose as in Nelson, B. C. But Chief Elliott’s department is equal to any emergency and the fireman immediately prepared to make war upon the hornets. Instead of rushing to the scene with bells ringing and sirens blowing they crept up quietly on the unsuspecting insects. The nest was located and promptly set on fire.

The Month That Was – August 1902

Ontario Reformer
Bullets in Their Brain
Edition 01 August 1902

PEOPLE WHO CARRY THEM AND FEEL NO ILL EFFECTS
Many Strange Things Found in the Brain – Some Curious Cases

The idea that the human brain is an organ so extremely delicate in its structure that it cannot bear the slightest physical hurt sometimes appears to receive a contradiction in the experience of people who have been met with peculiar injuries to the head. The history of brain surgery presents some remarkable facts in regard to the extent to which the thinking organ will sometimes resist the effects of external injury. It has been shown that in some cases quantities of its substance may be removed without appreciably diminishing the normal intelligence of the patient; while some have been known to carry the most extraordinary foreign substance embedded in their skulls for years.

Finds of the most singular kind have been made in the interior substances of the living human brain. The strangest things have been known to find entry there through accident or design. In one case it was the blade of a penknife that was carried about in the brain for half a lifetime without the patient being in the least aware of it: in another it was a penholder that had somehow found its way there and remained in its living hiding-place without apparently interfering with the thinking power of the organ: while only a week or so ago a piece of slate pencil was recovered from a boy’s brain after it had been hidden there for several years.

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Ontario Reformer
The McLaughlin Carriage Co.’s Employes [SIC] Excursion
Edition 22 August 1902

Saturday morning last the sun rose upon a cloudless sky, for the weather clerk had notice that on that day the employees of the McLaughlin Carriage Company were to run their excursion to Orillia. A special train had been chartered for the occasion and the extremely low rate of $1.95 was secured for the excursionists. Long before the hour set for departure the street corners along Simcoe and King streets were crowded with people waiting for cars to carry them to the station. About eight o’clock the train of eleven coaches drawn by two engines, started from Oshawa. The train was tastily decorated for the occasion by the Committes [SIC]. The service rendered by the railway was highly satisfactory, for the run was made in about three hours and a half, which was passed by the excursionists in pleasant conversation and in viewing the varied scenery of river, lake, hill, and harvest.

The Oshawa Citizen’s Band was in attendance to furnish music for the day and the baseball and lacrosse teams went along to play games.

When Orillia was reached part of people got off the train and formed a procession, headed by the band, which proceeded to the park, while the train carried the remainder direct to the Park. Here dinner was partaken of by those who had carried their blankets, the rest going to the hotels. In the afternoon a baseball game was played between the Oshawa team and a team from the employees of the Tudhope Carriage Co., of Orillia. The Oshawa players were to fast for Orillia and succeeded in scoring 22 runs to Orillia’s 6.  There was no programme of games as the lacrosse game on the oval called for 3 o’clock. Those who did not attend the lacrosse game spent the balance of the afternoon taking in the town or quietly resting in the park, which is beautifully situated on the shore of Lake Couchiching … The whole day was pleasantly spent by employer and employee and showed the harmony that exists in this great Oshawa industry. The return journey was commenced about 7 o’clock and by 11 o’clock all were safely at home save for a few who remained over Sunday. The Committee of Management carried out the whole program successfully and it is due to their untiring efforts that the 700 people who went to Orillia enjoyed as ideal holiday…

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Ontario Reformer
Oshawa-On-The-Lake
Edition 01 August 1902

A very severe thunderstorm, accompanied by rain and lightning stuck this camp on Saturday afternoon and raised great havoc. The large dining tent was blown down and the centre poles broken. The headquarters tent was also blown down and part of the contents of the canteen destroyed. One of the small tents was broken down and most of the bedding in the others was very wet afterwards. The occupants of the other tents, had to hang on to their tents for about half an hour or all would have been blown down. On Sunday afternoon another sudden storm came up, but as the officers had timely warning very little damage was done, excepting in the cook house where a large amount of bread was destroyed, almost depriving the boys of their next morning’s breakfast; no order could be got uptown, as the telephone lines were destroyed. However, the younger boys did not suffer any as Mr. Carey kindly offered them shelter in his barn, which was gratefully accepted. However, the younger boys did not suffer any as Mr. Carey kindly offered them shelter in his barn, which was gratefully accepted.

 

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Ontario Reformer
Excursion to Toronto
Edition 01 August 1902

Durham Old Boy’s Association of Toronto has invited all former and present residents of Durham County to be their guests in Yoronto [SIC], on Monday next, as a grand reunion picnic to e held on the beautiful grounds of Dr. John Hoskin, K.C. The Dale, Howard Street of Bloor. A free dinner will be served at12 o’clock, and a splendid program will follow. Cheap rates have been obtained on the Grand Trunk Railway, going by local train only, and returning by any train same day as follows: –

Darlington –   7:00 a.m.                  $1.25
Oshawa et. –  8:00 “                        $1.10
Whitby –         8:00 “                           $ 1.10
Pickering –      8:00 “                          $1.10

 

Ontario Reformer
Kawartha Lakes
Edition 01 August 1902

A Place to Spend a Happy Holiday

Before deciding on a place at which to spend the vacation this summer, it is well to take into consideration the many advantages of the Kawartha Lakes region of Ontario, Canada. As a place for camping the region has no superior. For the most part, the shores of the lakes are untouched by man. Nature is seen in all her grand disorder, there being nowhere that artificially, which to the true lover of nature, often spoils landscape. Pure air and water, each of which in a factor in choosing a summering place are assured in that region. Transportation on the lakes is also amply provided by a steamboat line plying between Lakefield and Coboconk, a distance of 70 miles. There is an additional attraction for the angler, as the fishing in the lakes is very good. The gamey [muskellunge] and black basses are here to reward the sportsman.

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Ontario Reformer
Canadian Prosperity
Edition 01 August, 1902

Canada’s prosperity, at present, is unprecedented. The trade returns for the final year ending June 30th, 1902, exceeded four hundred million dollars – the exact figures being $414, 517, 368, while those of last year were $377, 689, 653, being an increase of $36, 826, 653 or 72 per cent over and above the trade of 1893, which was the last year during the life of the late government.

……..

In proportion to population, the trade of Canada is not considerable more than double the relative volume of trade of the United States. In 1901 the latter, with its seventy millions of people, had a total volume of exports and imports aggregating $2, 301, 937, 156, which proportionately, is not on half of Canada’s trade last year.

This is not due to any epidemic growth in any one line of progress, but the progress along all the avenues of trade. The agricultural increase last year was very remarkable, and the exports exceeded those of the year previous more than 50 per cent. Nor did the manufacturers’ exports fall off, but were ahead of the times in every [way].

 

Ontario Reformer
Ontario Malleable Iron Co. Employees Annual Picnic
Edition 01 August 1902

The employees of the Ontario Malleable Iron Co., with their families and friends, held their annual picnic at Oshawa-on-the-Lake last Saturday. The affair was a success and a day of delight to all who took part in it. When all had assembled the number was computed at between two and three thousand. The event was highly creditable to all concerned, evincing thorough and hearty harmony between employers and employees. The large crowd were accommodated to the utmost by the Street Railway Co. and Mr. Arthur Henry. An excellent program of sports and attractions was provided for the entertainments of all present. The weather, in the morning and afternoon was fine and warm, but towards evening a severe thunder and rain storm was disappointing to many who were just at supper the lawns.

The music furnished by the Oshawa Citizen’s Band afforded delight to listeners on the grounds in the afternoon, and during the evening in the pavilion where dancing was pleasantly indulged in.

The Month That Was – July 1867

The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 03 July 1867
NOTICE.
Columbus

THE ANNIVERSARY of the Columbus Bible Christian Sabbath School will (D.V.) be held on Sunday and Monday, the 7th and 8th of July.

On Sabbath two sermons will be delivered, at 2 1.2 and 6 o’clock p.m., and collections taken up.

On Monday the children will meet at 1 ½ and the exercises will commence at 2 o’clock p.m., and continue for two hours. Tea will be served to the children at 4 o’clock, and to the public immediately after. Tickets 25 cents; for children not members of the school, 12 ½ cents. The public are cordially invited. A good time may be expected.

 

The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 03 July 1867
Confederation Day

The first morning of the New Dominion was ushered in Oshawa with the ringing of bells and the firing of cannon, including a salute from the guns of the juvenile battery. The chief occupation of all seemed to be to make preparations to leave town. The greater portion of the population went to Whitby, others to Toronto, and a few Eastward. The afternoon here was one of unusual quietness. The numerous flags flying from flagstaffs and private houses was the only mark of the day. Everyone store was closed and every workshop was silent, and Oshawa was literally the deserted village. The few people that had not left in the morning wended their way to Cedardale to a private picnic, where the afternoon was heartily enjoyed. In the evening the Ontario Bank and some other buildings were illuminated. The people of Oshawa having agreed to give way to Whitby and join in the celebration there, strictly kept her faith.

 

The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 03 July 1867
Coalition

Our beloved queen has entrusted the formation of the first cabinet which is to govern the Dominion of Canada to Sir. J. A. McDonald (sic) and we doubt not that. Her advisers were careful before he left England to impress upon him the advisability of having all sections of the country fully represented therein.

We have every reason to believe that Sir John has since the Coalition of 1864 full realized, the importance of the work in which he has taken so active apart, and that he has aimed to bring it to such a conclusion as every true patriot would deserve.

Now, while we cannot endorse his past career, and though we have energetically opposed the Tory party of which he was the leader in the past, we are quite open to believe that he, together with the rest of us, sees in the prospects of the new Dominion a future worthy of a statesman; that he is willing to waine considerations of minor party importance – and taking his stand upon a constitution – itself the outcome of a fusion of party hitherto antagonistic, to devote himself to the … administration of the laws of Canada, for the benefit of the whole country.

 

The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 10 July 1867
The Trees

On Saturday night one of the finest and largest trees in Centre street was broken off by the wind. Upon examination, the cause of this was easily discovered, the three having been much injured at the place where it broke off by chafing against the guards. Numbers of others are in the same condition. Some remedy ought at once to be adopted. The most of the trees are now firmly enough rooted to do without the guards, and these ought to be removed. Where this cannot be done with safety, the trees ought to be secured from injury with bandages.

The Road and Bridge Committee are now taking action in the matter. The law, however, give the owners control of the trees opposite their property. It would be well if they exercise their right to look after them. The village has planted and protected the trees thus far, and it is not too much to ask property owners to do the little that remains to be done.

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The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 10, July, 1867
Mowing Match

One of the largest trials of movers ever held in Canada, was held in the Township of Fullarton, Country of Perth, a few days ago. Nine machines took part in the competitions, five of them being varieties of the Ohio pattern. The machines were tested upon these points: lightness of draught, quality of the work done, and quality of material and style of workmanship upon the machine. After a thorough test and examination of each of these particulars the Ohio Combined Reaper and Mover, manufactured at the Joseph Hall Works here, was awarded the first prize, as being the best made, having the best material, being the lightest draught, and having the closest and neatest work of any machine upon the ground. About a thousand farmers witnessed the contest, and the manner in which they followed the Hall machine whilst at work, and the strong commendations bestowed upon it afterwards showed they heartily agreed with the judges – This adds another to the long list of first prized which these machines have obtained in fairly contested fields.

 

The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 24 July 1867
Mr. Gibbs Meeting in Oshawa

Mr. Gibbs held a meeting of his friends on Saturday evening. Nearly three hundred rate payers were present. Several addresses were delivered by the most prominent men of the town. A unanimous vote pledging Mr. Gibbs their support of the meeting, moved by Mr. Cowan and seconded by Mr. Glen, was passed. The most enthusiastic feeling prevailed. It is pretty clear what the result will be in Oshawa.

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The Oshawa Vindicator
July, 1867
MARRIED

In Oshawa, on the 17th last, by the Rev. L. B. Caldwell, Miss Sophia Maria Graham, of Whitby, to Mr. Will Clarke, of Pickering.

At Colbourne, July 16th, BY Rev. Mr. Lomas, Bowmanville, the Rev. D. Simpson, Primitive Methodist Minister, formerly of Oshawa, to Miss Mary Grace Barrett, of Bruse Mines, Algoma District.

By Rev. G. Abbs, of the “Christian Advocate,” at Palermo, June 15, 1867, Rev. W. Pirrette, of the Brooklin M. E. Church, and Grand Worthy Patriarch of the Sons of Temperance of Canada West, to ALvina L. Winehell, of Palermo, formerly of Barringon, Mass, U.S.

 

The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 31 July 1867
Devil Worshippers

This singular race, called the devil-worshippers, who dwell among the Koorde, numbers about one hundred thousand, and are from and ancient Persian race. They speak the Koord’s language. Their symbol is the Peacock, an image of which they worship at their sacred shrine. They are largely under the control of their priests, who teach them that it is essential to manhood to lie, steal, murder, and be a dog. To kill someone is necessary to become a man.

To sin on quietly because you do not intend to sin always is to live on a reversion which will probably never be yours.

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The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 31, July, 1867
United Grammar and Common Schools, Oshawa

Wanted for the above, A FEMALE TEACHER for the Primary Division. Salary $220 per an.

Also, a Female Teacher for the Senior Division of the Female Department; one capable of teaching French and Drawing preferred.

Applications, with testimonials &e., to be forwarded to the undersigned, not later than 10th August.

  1. Carswell,
    Secretary

 

The Oshawa Vindicator
Edition 31 July 1867
What is Soda Water!
ATKINSON’s Drug Store

Soda water is pure water highly charged with Carbonic Acid Gas. This gas exists in great purity in marble. In extracting it, vessels capable of resisting great pressure, 100 to 200 pounds to the inch are required.

The New York Board of Health says: “we regard Soda Water (Carbonic Acid Gas in water) as the only innocent drink of all the mineral waters in use.

Dr. Maxwell of Ouloutts, remarks: “In the treatment of Cholera I found Soda Water both grateful and beneficial.” This kind of Soda Water you can only obtain in its true purity and strength at ATKINSON’s Drug Store.