Historical Context, Modern Narratives, and Louis Riel

By Lisa Terech, Community Engagement

One of our popular Blog Series is ‘The Month That Was,’ which looks at a month of newspapers from the past, highlighting interesting stories, images, advertisements, and anything else eye catching. Often, the stories are quaint, humourful, or sometimes, they can give an insight into the happenings and/or politics at the time.  Newspapers leading up to elections are always interesting, especially those from the mid 1800s as the newspapers had very evident political biases. 

Sometimes, a simple annotation to the historical article can enhance a modern reader’s understanding of the event. For example, the August 9, 1872 edition of the Ontario Reformer reported:

Grace Marks received her pardon on condition that she would leave this country never to return.  She left Kingston on Tuesday, for the United States.

With this, an annotation was added, explaining that Grace was the subject of the popular Margaret Atwood book, later turned miniseries, Alias Grace.

When the trivia is short and simple, it makes annotating easy without taking away from the purpose of the article, highlighting stories from decades past.

However, while reading the newspapers in October 1873, news stories gave pause and left questions as to whether to present the articles as written, to annotate, or to exclude the stories because the additional context needed was greater than the blog post allowed. We opted for the latter, allowing another post, this one, to give the needed context.

Many articles in the October 24,1873 edition of the Ontario Reformer were discussing the results of a by-election in Manitoba which saw Louis Riel elected as a Member of Parliament.

The editors of the Reformer published their own editorials, slanted with their Liberal bias:

The Riel Difficulty
Riel, the murderer of Scott, is in Ottawa to-day claiming his seat as one of the People’s representatives, sheltering himself from just punishment behind a pardon granted by Sir John Macdonald… The question will then arise, however, how far that amnesty can be made to stretch.  While granting immunity to subjects in rebellion to Her Majesty’s laws, can it be also held to shelter the wilful, deliberate, unprovoked brutal murder of one of Her Majesty’s loyal subjects – not while in arms against the so-called Provisional Government, but while a helpless prisoner, utterly incapable of either resistance or disturbance. We believe very many of the member’s from Ontario maintain that the amnesty cannot be held to cover this foul crime, and we trust that bad as the character which the second Parliament has earned it, it will not be further sullied by association with a convicted murderer.

There was also the following inclusion:

An Opinion of Riel
We have been requested to publish the following resolution, passed last evening, and we commend it to the attention of the Hon. Mr. Gibbs:

Oshawa, Oct 23rd, 1873

An Emergency Meeting of the LO [Loyal Orange] Lodge, No 686, held at Oshawa, it was unanimously resolved that we regret to learn, that Louis Riel has been elected as a Representative to the House of Commons, of the Dominion of Canada, and , that we, as a Body, feel that his presence as a Representative in your Honorable House, would be a scandal and disgrace to our country, and utterly distasteful to the Members of our Loyal Orange Association, as well as to a large portion of the inhabitants of our Country, and we humbly trust that measures will be taken as will prevent him from taking a seat in the Parliament of the Dominion, and to bring him speedily to account for the murder of Thomas Scott in Manitoba, and that a copy of this resolution be sent to the Secretary of State and the Governor General of the Dominion of Canada.

The words being used by the various authors are strong: “murderer,” “utterly distasteful,” “foul crime,” and “disgrace to our country.” According to the Reformer, the local Orange Society was one of many around the country holding such meetings, wanting to see justice against Riel “if he attempts to enter the Province.”

Without providing additional historical and contemporary context to Riel, presenting these articles, as written, are not giving the full picture of the happenings of the Red River Rebellion or of Riel himself, whom we know today to be a complex historical figure, far more complex than the villain he is painted to be by many of his colonial contemporaries.

According to his Dictionary of Canadian Biography entry, Louis Riel is “one of the most controversial figures in Canadian history,” with the Métis  people regarding him a hero, the French Canadians sympathizing with this “victim of Ontario religious and racial bigotry,” and while those in the mid-1800s in the Canadian east painted him the villain, many today regard him as one of the Father of Confederation, a founder of the province of Manitoba.

Carte-de-Visite Portrait of Louis Riel
Notman Studio. Library and Archives Canada, e003895129
Carte-de-visite portrait of Louis Riel taken in Ottawa after his election as MP for Provencher, Manitoba, 1873.
Image from the Canadian Encyclopedia

Riel was born on October 22, 1844 in Saint-Boniface, Red River Settlement (modern Manitoba).  He was regarded as very well spoken, and he gained notoriety in the late 1860s, standing up for Métis culture, way of life, and rights.

A purchase of land by the government from the Hudson’s Bay Company and subsequent land surveys resulted in the organization the Métis National Committee. They denied the surveyor entrance to the lands, Upper Fort Garry was seized from the HBC, and the Red River Colony, under the leadership of Riel, was formed.  In December 1869, the “Declaration of the People of Rupert’s Land and the North-West,” was issued, rejecting “Canada’s authority to govern the Northwest and propos[ing] a negotiated settlement between Canada and the new provisional government” (Canadian Encyclopedia). Canadian delegates were sent, and negotiations resulted in the Manitoba Act, creating the fifth province to enter Confederation.  It was agreed that 1.4 million acres were to be reserved for Métis descendants, and it was also promised that Manitoba would officially be bilingual.

Meanwhile, a small group of Canadians appeared unpleased with the provisional Métis government.  They proceeded to Portage la Prairie, armed, and surprising the Métis who in turn imprisoned them.  A young Orangeman, Thomas Scott, was sentenced to death by a court martial convened by the Métis, a sentence that was not commuted by Riel; Scott was executed on March 4, 1870.  Protestants and Orange Lodge members in Ontario placed the blame for Scott’s death (or murder, as described later in Oshawa papers) upon Riel, who fled into exile after the Rebellion.

Clearly, the situation surrounding the death of Thomas Scott is layered and cannot be simplified into the black and white. It fits well into the modern narratives of land rights, reconciliation, colonization, and repatriation. The Métis peoples appeared to be defending the lands where they had lived for decades and upon which their Indigenous ancestors had lived for millennia. Riel, representing the Red River Colony, was defending his people and their culture.  To simply present the 1873 ‘English/Orange’ narrative of Riel as murderer without the additional context, is an unfair representation, furthering the mistakes of history and repeating the 19th century detrimental biases.  The editors of the Ontario Reformer, in their wording of ‘so-called Provisional Government,’ made it clear how they felt about Riel’s and the Métis’ actions in late 1869/early 1870.

After his election in 1873, Riel took the oath but never took his seat in the House of Commons, fearing assassination or arrest. In the 1880s, Riel led a second, unsuccessful, rebellion for which he was sentenced to death, which was carried out on November 16, 1885 in Regina.

It is difficult to fully present the Red River Rebellion and founding of Manitoba in a blog post.  In writing this post, content from the Metis Nation of Ontario, the Canadian Encyclopedia, and Dictionary of Canadian Biography was used, and it is highly encouraged that they are examined for further reading.

http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/riel_louis_1844_85_11E.html

https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/louis-riel

http://www.metisnation.org/culture-heritage/louis-riel/

The Month That Was – May 1873

All articles appeared in the Ontario Reformer

May 7 1873
Death & Inquest
The young man Farrel whom we reported in our last issue as having been injured on Saturday night, the 26th ult., died on Tuesday the 20th.  Owing to the peculiar circumstances under which deceased received his injuries it was thought advisable that an inquiry should be instituted.  Dr. Clarke was accordingly notified, and summoned a jury for 2 o’clock, on Wednesday last.  A number of witnesses were examined as to the manner in which the injuries were inflicted.  The testimony was given, went to show that the deceased was intoxicated, and had got upon a wagon going through the village in the direction of Harmony, between nine and ten that evening, and shortly after engaged with two others upon the wagon in a “scuffle,” which resulted in deceased tumbling overboard, the wagon passing over his head, face, and neck.

Drs. McGill and Coburn, who had seen him after the accident, made a post mortem examination of the parts, and testified as to the nature of the injuries… The opinion was that the death resulted from the effects of the injuries to the throat.  The jury, with Mr. Jno. Larke as foreman, returned as their verdict, “Accidental Death.”

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May 7, 1873, page 1

May 7, 1873
Mr Carswell is advertised to give a lecture in the Music Hall, on Friday evening next.  The lecturer has just returned after a lengthened tour through the United States, and the public press wherever he has spoken speak of him in the highest terms.

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May 7, 1873, page 3; for more on the fire, please see The Month That Was – December 1872

May 7, 1873
Our enterprising neighbour, Mr. AS Whiting, has caused within the last few days, a number of beautiful trees to be planted on each side of Simcoe Street, from the railway to the edge of the pond, and along the street leading to the harbour… Anything Mr. Whiting undertakes to do is always well done; this fact is plainly evidenced in his tree planting.  It has been observed that those put out under his instructions and supervision flourished and grown rapidly when others die.  Cedar Dale but a few years ago was not in existence, through the establishment and enterprising of the Cedar Dale Works, in now takes the position of a handsome and flourishing neighbour.

 

May 14 1873
Married
On the 7th inst. At Christ’s Church, Owosso, Michigan, by the Rev. Mr. Whitney, Robert Woon, esq., of Oshawa, to Miss Alice Ingersoul, Owosso, Michigan.

 

May 21, 1873
Queen’s Birthday
The Grand Musical Jubilee
We call the attention to the spirited entertainment got up by the Victoria Lodge of Orange Young Britons for the birthday of our beloved queen.  May we have the pleasure of commemorating many such days for her! The programme is an extra good one, and the selections of songs such as insures a crammed hall.  The array of outside talent procured – professionals all – reflects the highest credit upon the Young Britons, and we feel certain with such a spacious room as our New Music Hall, a rare treat is in store for the people of Oshawa on next Saturday night. Get your reserved seat tickets in time or you may have to take your place near the draft of the door

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May 21, 1873, page 3

May 21, 1873
Oshawa Enterprise – Our indefatigable fellow-townsman, JW Fowke, has just shipped from Whitby Harbour a cargo by the Schooner Kate 4,500 bushels Wheat and 1,500 bushels Peas for Montreal.  He is collecting another cargo of wheat and one of wool for which he pays cash.  Go ahead Fowke and scatter the cash among the farmers.

May 21, 1873
Barnum’s Great Show – We have received the “Advance Courier” of Mr. PT Barnum, from which we learn, that he is again in possession of the largest, most elaborate and exhaustive combination of travelling exhibition ever exhibited on earth, embracing 20 shows consolidated in one.  This great Show will visit Canada in July, and no doubt will favor us with a visit.

May 21, 1873
All parties wishing to celebrate her Majesty’s Birthday, will do well to at Hodder’s and buy a new hat.

 

May 28, 1873
The Village constable, as will be seen by referring to our advertising columns, has been instructed to impound all cattle running at large upon our public streets after Monday next.

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May 28, 1873, page 3

May 28, 1873
The band of the St. Patrick’s Benevolent Society wish to tender to the inhabitants of Oshawa, their more grateful acknowledgement for the very kind manner in which they were received on the morning of the Queen’s birthday.  Their liberal response was beyond their expectation, therefore they wish to inform the public that they will always find them ready and willing to oblige them on any occasion where their services would benefit, and especially on any benevolent or charitable purples, and also with it to be distinctly understood that they are not in opposition to any other party, their motto is and always will be “Harmony.”

May 28, 1873
Fire crackers have at different times of late been the cause of a great deal of mischief and loss of property.  In Whitby on the 24th, a house was  set on fire by their use but happily extinguished before much damage was done.  In some places the sidewalks in Oshawa were fired in the same way.  The authorities would be justified in forbidding their use when danger is likely to result

The Month That Was – April 1872

All articles originally appeared in the Ontario Reformer

April 5, 1872

Barnum wants him – the man with the big cheek, who wants the Joseph Hall Works moved from Oshawa – the man who wrote to Mr. Glen offering him a “free water privilege, a liberal bonus, and freedom from taxation if he would remove to Hall Words to that town” – the town where the man lived. Oh no; the Halls Works is a big part of Oshawa, and it would spoil the looks of the town to have it removed.  It is very nicely situated, and pays well.

 

Lacrosse

A meeting of the Oshawa Lacrosse club will be held at Black’s hotel on Tuesday evening next, at 8 o’clock. All persons interested in out door sports, are invited to attend.  The Lacrosse boys have never been beaten, and intend to “go in strong” this year.  It is of the utmost importance that every member of the club should attend, and they are requested to bring along as many friends as possible.

April 5 72 p1

Earthquake

California last week experienced a most terrible earthquake.  The volcanic district in which it occurred is about four hundred miles southeast from San Francisco.  Only a slight shock was felt at the time in Northern and Central California.  The town of Low Pine, however, appears to be immediate over the centre of disturbance.  The first shock resembled the roar of artillery, fired immediately under the town. Nearly the whole population were buried beneath the ruins of the houses, and the air was filled with the cries and shrieks of the maimed and wounded, who were unable to extricate themselves, and who were calling for help.  The first shock was followed in rapid succession by three others of equal severity.  Over three hundred distinct shocks were felt between half-past two o’clock in the morning and sunrise. The fact is, the earth was in almost constant tremble and vibration for over three hours…  Over thirty persons have been killed, and more than one hundred were wounded.  Smoke and lava have issued from several of the mountain peaks in the same region of the country.

 

April 12, 1872

Clean Up

Now is the time for every householder to see that his premises are thoroughly cleaned, and disinfectants properly applied.  Tuesday afternoon last being quite warm, the stench arising from several yards we had occasion to pass, was fairly sickening; and if no remedy is applied the result can easily be foreseen.  Filth and disease go together; and if we are to escape the latter, we must set scavengers at work, and be in nowise chary in our use of disinfectants.  The work should be done now before the weather becomes warmer; and we how that our Health Inspector will at once proceed on his rounds, and make sure that the law in regard to filthy premises is fulfilled to the very letter.

April 12 72 p3_1_stitch.jpg

For Sale

The property on Selina St., consisting of a story and a half Frame dwelling, with stone foundation.  There is a stable and driving shed attached, and a good garden with a number of choice Fruit Trees on it: also, a never-failing well of excellent water.  For terms and other particulars apply on the premises, to Walter Fogg.

 

April 19

On Monday evening last, the members of the Oshawa fire brigade, with a few of their friends, assembled at the Town Hall to present Mr. Scott and Mr. Crockhart – who were about leaving this town for Scotland – the following address, as a token of esteem for these two gentlemen:

To David J Scott lieut. and James Crockhart ,sec’y Oshawa “Dreadnaught Hook and Ladder Company”

Dear comrades, -As you are soon to leave us on a visit to your native Scotland, we, the members of the Oshawa fire brigade, do you know that we cannot allow you to depart without an expression of the regret we feel at a temporary sundering of the connection between us.

We address you conjointly because we believe it will be agreeable to you both, who have been marked for your strong friendly attachment to each other, and because the sentiments we shall utter are equally applicable to you both.

For over two years either as private or officers, you have been members of the brigade. As private you were obedient to those in authority, and prompt and untiring in the performance of every duty and as officers you proved yourself skillful, kind and considerate.

In your private life your characters have been irreproachable, and you have ever manifested a readiness to assist in every good work.

In the illness, which is the cause of his leaving us, we deeply sympathize with Mr. James Crockhart, and pray that the breezes of his native land may restore him to vigorous health.

We also pray that Divine Providence me overrule the winds and waves that you may have a safe and pleasant Atlantic voyage, a speedy reunion with relatives and friends, and in their lovely company realize all anticipated joy.

Hoping that you may be spared to return to Oshawa to rejoin our ranks and participate in the honors and dangers of our association whose aim and ambition it is to save, we bid you an affectionate farewell.

Signed on behalf of the brigade, PH Thornton, Chief Engineer, H Barkell, Secretary

 

April 26, 1872

A big clock – the large clock at the English Parliament House is the largest in the world. The four dials of this clock are 22 feet in diameter. Every half minute the point of the minute hand moves nearly 7 inches. The clock will go eight and a half days, but it only strikes for seven and a half, thus indicating any neglect and winding it up. The mere winding up of the striking mechanism takes two hours. The pendulum is 15 feet long; the wheels are of cast iron; the hour bell is 8 feet high, and 9 feet in diameter, weighing nearly 15 tons, and the hammer alone weighs more than 400 pounds. This clock strikes the quarter hours, and by its strokes the short hand reporters in the parliament chambers regulate their labors. At every stroke a new reporter takes the place of the old one, whilst the first retires to write out the notes that he has taken during the previous 15 minutes.

April 26 72 p3

Two weeks have passed since the assembling of parliament at Ottawa, and very little has been done yet, beyond the answering of several questions by members of the government. Ministerial measures foreshadowed in the address, few as they were, are not yet ready for presentation to the house; and as a consequence the daily sittings generally last about an hour or two. The cabinet sessions are doubtless more occupied with plotting how to retain office then and maturing measures for the public weal.

 

The Month That Was – March 1863

All articles originally appeared in The Oshawa Vindicator

March 11, 1863
The Oshawa Volunteers
Yesterday being a holiday, the Oshawa Volunteer Force was out for exercise.  This branch of the service consists of two companies- one of Rifles, under command of Capt. John Warren and the other of Infantry, under command of Major S.B. Fairbanks. It must be admitted that the members of these companies, though under drill but a short time, began to assume the all manner and bearing of real soldiers. They have recently provided themselves at their own expense, with neat capes, which add very much to the effect of their uniform.

 

Mare Astray
Came into the premises of the subscriber, Lot No. 8, 3rd Con. of East Whitby, about the 1st of January last, A BROWN MARE rising three. The owner is requested to prove property, pay charges and take her away. James Ross, East Whitby, March 3rd, 1863. 390-w

 

Mar 63 1

March 18, 1863
Oshawa Grammar School
We are glad to learn that this Institution is now FULL of pupils, every desk being fully occupied. This speaks well for ability and test of Professor Lumsden to whose zeal and preservation the possession of a Grammar School by our village is almost wholly attributable.

 

B.C.S.S Anniversary
We are happy to learn that the second anniversary of the Bible Christian Sabbath School.

Oshawa was a complete success in every respect. The attendance was very large, the preparations and performance were good, and the income, after paying the expenses, something like $50. The provision of eatables was abundant, so much that notwithstanding the large company fed, a considerable quantity was disposed of by auction at the close of the proceedings. This will no doubt prove a welcome addition of the funds of the school, and evinces on the part of the members with which the school is connected, a lively interest in the welfare of their “nursery”—one worthy of imitation elsewhere.

Mar 63 2

March 25, 1863
Save Your Teeth – How to do it
Mr. Beccher, who is something of a physiologist, as well as a theologist, farmer, editor, author, lecturer and reformer generally, says, “Our teeth decay. Hence unseemly mouths, bad breath, imperfect mastication. Everybody regrets it. What is the cause? It is a want of cleanliness. A clean tooth never decays. The mouth is a warm place—98 degrees. Particles of meat between the teeth decompose. Gums and teeth must suffer. Cleanliness will preserve the teeth to old age….

Sugar, acids, salertus are nothing compared to food left in the teeth. Mercury may loosen the teeth, use may wear them out, but keep them clean and they will never decay. This advice is worth more than a thousand dollars to each boy and girl. Books have been written on this subject. This brief article contains all that is essential.

 

LOST
In Oshawa, on Friday the 27th, a BLACK WOOL VEIL with lilac flowers on it. Any person leaving the same at the Vindicator office, will confer a favor upon the owner. March 4th, 1863.

 

“Shall I Learn to Dance?”
Certainly, by all means. Commence with the ‘quickstep’ out of bed in the morning and keep it up until the ‘chores’ are all finished. The boys of course will have a ‘cow drill’, while the girls are engaged in a ‘country dance’, in the kitchen. After this, all hands ‘change’, and ‘promenade’ to school, keeping step to the music of merry laughter. Repeat the same of the way home at night, with an occasional variation by ‘tripping the toe’, and having a ‘break down’ in the snow bank. A ‘reel’ now and then will be quite in place for the girls who have learned to spin, but the boys should never think of it. If these and kindred dances are thoroughly [practiced] they will leave little time and no necessity for the polkas, schottisches, rnd (sic) other immodest fooleries of the ball-room.

The Month That Was – February 1926

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Daily Reformer

Sees Fishworm, Is It a Sign of Spring?
Monday, February 1, 1926

That spring is not far away is quite evident. Yesterday morning while on his way to the Y.M.C.A, Mr. W. J. Richards overtook a tiny fishworm making its way to the “Y” also. On giving it a lift, the wriggler made it quite plain to “Bill” that what it desired most was a few swimming lessons from instructor Cliff James, so Bill put it in a glass in the private office of the “Y” where it is patiently waiting for the first of a series of swimming instructions which Cliff will commence this afternoon.

 

See Views of Japan
Tuesday, February 2, 1926

Japan was the theme of the pictures shown by Mr. Elliot last evening in the Westmount school. These proved to be interesting and of an educational nature. There were views of Yokohama and its neighbouring shrines of the different industries, silk, rice, carving, weaving and fishing. Some of the slides showed the beauty of these small islands with their wistaria vines and cherry blossoms and the Japanese in their native dress. A short comedy was given as well. Preceding the pictures and during intermission a program was given by Misses Stacey, Salter and Rundle. Proceeds $9.15.

 

Minstrel Show Tonight
Wednesday, February 3, 1926

The minstrel show being presented by the Anglican Young Men’s Club tonight in the Parish Hall promises to eclipse former efforts. The play will be given again tomorrow night. Next Tuesday the troupe will play in Brooklin and on Wednesday night it will be given at the Centre Street Home and School Club.

 

Local Water Supply Of Good Quality
Thursday, February 4, 1926

The report on the samples of Oshawa’s water supply is again described as “very good quality” by the Provincial Laboratories. Samples taken from a number of wells received a similar report, according to D. A. Hubbell, who received the report this morning.

 

Local Druggist’s Fine New Store
W.H. Karn Now Occupies Elaborate Quarters In New Henry Block.
Thursday, February 4, 1926

To cope with the rapid increase in the volume of business is the reason given by Mr. W. H. Karn’s Drug Store, for moving into the new store at King and Ontario streets, directly opposite the Post office. With the increased space better facilities are offered for the filling of prescriptions which tends to faster delivery. A new store which is equipped with the most up-to-date fixtures is arranged into departments which gives greater display and makes it easier for the store’s patrons to select their purchases. The centre of the store is kept comparatively clear of show cases which gives customers ample room to see the various displays. Increased window space has also been obtained by the move.

Mr. Karn, who was a graduate of the 1921 class of the Ontario Pharmacy College, entered the old store, located one door west, four years ago. He is now employing three graduate druggists and four apprentices.

 

New Machine Is Heard In Oshawa
Demonstration of Panatrope At Luke Furniture Co. – Latest Product.
Friday, February 5, 1926

The Panatrope, the latest addition to the musical world was demonstrated in Oshawa last night before about one hundred local citizens in the new Music Department of the Luke Furniture Company, King street east by D. A. Tait who is in charge of that section. From the comment expressed by the Panatrope made a favourable impression on the minds of those who had the opportunity of hearing this exceptional instrument.

Public demonstrations will be given this evening and again tomorrow night at the Luke Furniture Company while on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday it will be heard at the Regent Theatre.

The machine which will be placed on the barket in the near future has the appearance of an ordinary talking machine but from then on it is entirely different. AN explanation of the machine is given in the name Panatrope which is derived from the Greek words Pana and Trope, pana meaning all and trope meaning octaves, hence the word Panatrope or all octaves. The machine which was demonstrated here was the original factory model and has traveled over 30,000 miles on demonstration trips which took it twice across the United States and Canada.

 

Oshawa Bonspiel Opens Tomorrow
Monday, February 8, 1926

Everything promises well for the biggest bonspiel Oshawa has held yet. Eight sheets of ice will be in operation and the first sixteen rinks will draw for the McLaughlin trophy at 10:30 o’clock tomorrow morning. At 11:30 o’clock, the draw for the A.J. Sykes Memorial trophy and the losers of the first two events enter into the consolation event for the W.F. Eaton trophy. Entries are expected from Peterboro, Lindsay, Lakefield, Millbrook, Picton, Colborne, Cobourg, Napanee, Belleville, Agincourt, Stouffville, Markham, Toronto Granites, Oakwoods and Queen City Clubs. From 20 to 30 local rinks will be entered and endeavour to carry away the prizes.

 

Police Raid The Hotels In Whitby
Take Samples of Beer Which Will be Analyzed in Toronto.
Tuesday, February 9, 1926

The squad of provincial officers who made the sensational raids on Oshawa residences in search of liquor on Saturday night also visited Whitby and searched the Royal Hotel and the Whitby House. Samples of beer were taken at both places and will be analyzed by provincial authorities at Toronto.

 

Valentine Masquerade
Friday, February 12, 1926

About seventy-five turned out to the Valentine masquerade dance held in the G.W.V.A. Hall last evening. Three prizes only were given out, and these to ladies, as no men came masked. Mrs. J. Smoker captured the best dressed lady’s prize, Mrs. C. Lemon, representing Santa Claus, won the best dressed man’s prize, and Mrs. Roller won the prize for the most comic lady. Around $15 in proceeds were taken in.

Annotation 2019-12-19 095944l
February 13, 1926