Month That Was – July 1930

Wednesday July 2, 1930

Pickpocket Suspect Caught At Races

Hamilton, July 2 – Arrested by Inspector Ward of the City of Toronto, and Constable Lyell, of the Hamilton race track, at the Hamilton Jockey Club, yesterday, William Blair, Detroit was remanded on a charge of vagrancy in police court this morning. The officers picked him up after a complaint by a racing man who felt a hand in his pocket and turned to see Blair walking away.

 

Thursday July 3, 1930

Editorial Notes

A New York man killed himself in a theatre. This is carrying dramatics too far. – Chatham News

 

Friday July 4, 1930

Editorial Notes

“Are there any modern day witches?” asks a writer. We haven’t noticed anybody flying about on vacuum-cleaners in our district. – Punch

 

Saturday July 5, 1930

Chimney is Trap to Catch Burglar Entering Store

Saint John, July 5 – Tightly wedged 30 feet down inside the chimney of the N.B. liquor store building on Main Street, William C. Stackhouse shouted two hours for aid yesterday, before police located the source of his smothered cries. Firemen and police extricated him by cutting a gap in the wall and removing chimney bricks.

Charged with breaking and entering the liquor store with intent to steal, Stackhouse pleaded guilty and was given two years in Dorchester penitentiary by Acting Magistrate Williams in police court.

Police said Stackhouse tried to enter the liquor store via the skylight. He had fallen into the chimney and had been unable to climb out.

 

Thursday July 10, 1930

Britain Has Banned Apples From U.S.

Toronto, July 9-A.M. Wiseman, British Trade Commissioner in Canada for Ontario, has received official information from the British Government of an order just issued prohibiting the importation of raw apples from the United States into the United Kingdom, between July 7 and Nov. 15, with the exception of certain fancy grades.

Mr. Wiseman has no information as to why the ban is placed, but it was learned from other sources that it may be due to a fruit fly, known in the United States as the “railroad borer”, which is not believed to be in England.

 

Thursday July 10, 1930

Cheese makers to Compete

Kingston – A very comprehensive competition for the cheese makers of Frontenac County has been organized and five trophies and over $200 in prize money has been obtained. The object of the competition is to stimulate more interest in the dairy industry.

 

Thursday July 10, 1930

Unusual Bible

Kinston – A most unusual book is that owned by Mrs. W. Ashton of 45 King Street West, this city. It is a history of the Bible, printed by H. & E. Phinney, Cooperstown, N.Y., in 1829 and the pages measure only one inch by one and a half inches.  The volume is bound in leather and is in remarkably good state of preservation. The print is very clear and the volume is illustrated by small wood cuts. It is believed to be the only book of its kind in existence and Mrs. Ashton has refused some very high offers for it.

 

Monday July 21, 1930

Young Tree-sitter Injured in Fall

Hamilton, July 21 – Inspired by reports of many and wonderful endurance contests Lionel Clause decided to make a name as a tree sitter for himself.

He started by climbing to the top of a tree in his back yard, but his name now appears in print not because he shattered existing records, but because he slipped. The lad sustained a compound fracture of the skull and is in general hospital in a serious condition.

 

Thursday July 31, 1930

Editorial Notes:

The next man who suggests having a contest in hot weather should be tapped on the head with a large mallet

Editorial Notes:

Some people seem to have all the luck. Here’s one chap getting his picture in all the the papers just because he is wanted by the police.

Oshawa Celebrates Canada Day

On July 1, 1867, The British North America Act came into effect on July 1, 1867, uniting the provinces of Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick as “One Dominion under the name of Canada. “

From the Oshawa Daily Reformer, 1927
From the Oshawa Daily Reformer, 1927

In Oshawa, the passing of the BNA Act was a relatively quiet affair, even though it had been designated as a celebration of Confederation for the country.  The day started with the firing of guns and ringing of bells, and many houses flew flags.   There was a parade along King Street and speeches were given in front of Gibb’s Store and Fowke’s. A picnic was held later in the day at Cedar Dale for those people of the community who did not go elsewhere such as the town of Whitby to celebrate.  It is estimated that 7,000 were present for the events in Whitby.

On June 20, 1868, a proclamation of Governor General Lord Monck called upon all Canadians to join in the celebration of the anniversary of the formation of Canada on July 1st.  The proclamation stated, “Now Know Ye, that I, Charles Stanley Viscount Monck, Governor General of Canada, do hereby proclaim and appoint WEDNESDAY, the FIRST day of JULY next, as the day on which the Anniversary of the formation of the Dominion a Canada be duly celebrated. And I do hereby enjoin and call upon all Her Majesty’s loving subjects throughout Canada to join in the due and proper celebration of the said Anniversary on the said FIRST day of JULY next.”

Oshawa residents observed this proclamation and celebrated the one year anniversary of Confederation.  The Oshawa Vindicator reported on July 8, 1868 that the 34th Battalion (later renamed the Ontario Regiment) assembled at 3 o’clock on Dominion Day on the Agricultural grounds in Whitby to receive a flag in the colours of the Queen.  The paper reported that “the attendance of spectators was immense, rendering it almost impossible to preserve sufficient space for moving the force.”

There was also a picnic held by the employees of the factories at Morris’s Grove on Dominion Day, and the Vindicator stated it was a success.  The picnic itself was slightly overshadowed by the presentation of the Colors, but nonetheless, attendance was still large.  There were games and a “friendly rivalry” between Foundry and Factory, and the Freeman family band played music throughout the day.  In the evening, the events continued in the drill shed where prizes were distributed, addresses were delivered and cheers given to the Queen, Messrs Miall, Glen, Whiting and Cowan, and to members of the committee.  Picnic attendees danced to the “late hour” to the music of the Freeman band.

Although not officially recognized as a holiday (it would be recognized as such in 1879), Oshawa residents celebrated Dominion Day in the years following confederation in similar manners.  Picnics were held, games were played, fireworks lit up the sky, and dancing continued into the night.  The 34th Battalion typically played a role in Dominion Day celebrations.

Canada’s Diamond Jubilee year was 1927, and both Canada and Oshawa celebrated this landmark.  The Oshawa Daily Reformer issued a special edition of their paper for June 30, commemorating 60 years since Confederation, particularly highlighting Oshawa’s achievements through the years.  In Lakeview Park, the Jubilee Pavilion was open for business on June 30th, 1927, with the official opening on Dominion Day.  The pavilion was named in honour of this landmark year.   Jubilee celebrations lasted for two days in Oshawa and included parades, sporting events, picnics, the playing of a speech from King George V, dancing, and fireworks.  The Ontario Regiment Band played, along with the Salvation Army Band, the Oshawa Kilties Band and the General Motors 75 member choir.  Dominion Day also included a commemorative ceremony for those who died during the Great War.  Memorial Park and Alexandra Park served as appropriate locales for Jubilee celebrations on Friday July 1, and on July 2, the party continued at Lakeview Park.

From the Oshawa Daily Reformer, 1927
From the Oshawa Daily Reformer, 1927

In 1967, the year of Canada’s Centennial, Oshawa appropriately celebrated this milestone.  The Oshawa Folk Festival had a Centennial Week celebration with events leading up to and including Dominion Day.  On July 1, there was a parade through to Alexandra Park and events through the afternoon, as well as events and fireworks at the Civic Auditorium.  Oshawa also took part in the “Wild Bells” program, with all church bells, factory whistles and sirens sounding when July 1 came in.  Hayward Murdoch, Oshawa’s Centennial Committee Chairman commented, “This seems like an excellent and appropriate way to usher in Canada’s 100th birthday.  We want to have as many bells, whistles and sirens sounding as possible.”

Celebrations for East Whitby Township took place in the Village of Columbus with the unveiling of a centennial plaque, a band concert, school choirs, barbeque and fireworks.

Oshawa also had a centennial house constructed at the corner of King Street and Melrose Street (just east of Harmony Road).  The project was coordinated by the Oshawa Builders Association, and profits of the sale of the home went to the Oshawa Retarded Children’s Association (now operating today as Oshawa/Clarington Association for Community Living).

In 1982, the name of the holiday was officially changed from “Dominion Day” to “Canada Day.”  Since 1984, Oshawa’s largest Canada Day celebrations have taken place in Lakeview Park.  In 1985, the opening of Guy House coincided with Canada Day festivities, and the opening of the new pier also took place on July 1, 1987.  In 1988, an elephant from the Bowmanville Zoo was part of the festivities, participating in a tug of war with city aldermen.  Canada’s 125th anniversary was in 1992, and the City organized a big party down at lakefront.  Every year, fireworks mark the end of the celebrations.

Canada Day at Henry House
Canada Day at Henry House

The City run Canada Day celebrations have been very successful over the years, drawing tens of thousands to Oshawa’s lakeshore.  They have also attracted a certain level of prestige, making Festivals and Events Ontario’s list of top 50 (later top 100) celebrations in 2004, 2005 and 2009.

Located in Lakeview Park, the Oshawa Community Museum takes part every year in Canada Day celebrations.  Over the years, the museum has had historical re-enactors, special displays, woodworking and blacksmithing demonstrations, and a Strawberry Social in the Henry House Gardens.  Currently, the Museum offers costumed tours of Henry House on Canada Day, and our Verna Conant Gallery is open in Guy House.

 

We will be open from 2-5 on July 1, 2013! Please visit!

 

References:

The Oshawa Vindicator, 1868-1870, various editions
Oshawa Daily Reformer, June 30, 1927
Oshawa Daily Times, July 4, 1927
Oshawa Community Archives (Subject 0012, Box 0001, Files 0003-0006, 0011, 0015)

Student’s Museum ‘Musings’ – Caitlan

HI, it’s me again, Caitlan, you all know me as the co-op student here at the museum. I have had a blast here. I love my mornings here and I know I originally I said I would be here till mid June. But it seems the museum and I are not ready to part ways yet. I am very excited to say that I will be here till the end of August. I will be continuing my co-op until my ‘last day’, June 18, and then I become part of the staff.

Catilan working hard in the Programming Office
Catilan working hard in the Programming Office

Over the next 2 months I will be working on the Robinson book. It seems the museum has loved all my photo manipulations and poster designs that the museum, that they want me to design the book. I want to keep a similar layout as The Story of Henry House, as the book will be quite similar; the Robinson book will also have about the family, the house & lot and the house as a museum, so I want it to have the similar feel. Also one thing that I never got to do since I have morning co-op was the tours, but since I will be here for the summer I will start doing tours. Although I am a bit nervous for giving tours I know I will have all the information down pat in no time. I encourage anyone to come down have a tour, take a walk on the path by the lake, I can say you will have a great day!       

One of Caitlan's photo manipulations.  The Robinsons of yesterday come back to their house today...
One of Caitlan’s photo manipulations. The Robinsons of yesterday come back to their house today…

Downtown Oshawa: Our Hidden Heritage

Oshawa’s downtown core is centred around King and Simcoe Streets, or, as many locals call it, the Four Corners.  This area was first settled by a man named John Kerr who purchased 200 acres at the northwest corner of King and Simcoe Streets in 1816.  For many years, the settlement was called Kerr’s Creek.

In the 1830s, local merchant, Edward Skae opened a popular general store at the corner of Simcoe and King Streets and the hamlet soon became known as Skae’s Corners.  In 1842, Edward Skae made application to the legislature for a post office.  He received a reply that a name other than “Corners” must be chosen for the post office as there were already too many place names containing ‘Corners.’  The name Oshawa was chosen and translates from the native dialect to mean ‘that point at the crossing of the stream where the canoe was exchanged for the trail.

Edward Skae's checkered store
Edward Skae’s checkered General Store

Oshawa’s downtown has seen several changes since it was settled almost 200 years ago.  Some of the heritage buildings are lost, some still stand, although they would be unrecognizable to early settlers, while a few buildings have remained steadfast through the years, as beloved as they were when they were first constructed.

On June 9, 2013, the Oshawa Museum is excited to host the return of the Downtown Walking Tour, highlighting the heritage than can be found around the Four Corners.  The tour will depart from the Oshawa Public Library, McLaughlin Branch (65 Bagot Street), at 12PM.

This walking tour is expected to take 1.5-2 hours in length.  The cost is $3 per person or FREE for members of the Oshawa Historical Society.

Please be sure to join us for a stroll through our Downtown Heritage!