The Month That Was – December 1864

During the month of December in 1864, Oshawa’s newspaper would display ads with the word Christmas incorporated as their main attraction. Companies such as Breminer & Urquhart and Murdoch brothers used Christmas as a way to sell their products and to raise their sales. Whether the products are foods or books, in December of 1864 the products became Christmas foods or gifts. Like today people would need to put their summer clothes away and start bundling up. While looking through the 1864 paper it was not hard to come across the companies who were selling cloths best suitable for the fall and winter seasons that would go for about 95 cents per yard. Some companies such as Wood & Bros would accept trades rather than a direct money charge. Not only was the Oshawa newspaper displaying ads on Christmas specials and seasonal cloths, it also displayed skates for sale so people could skate as a winter pass time. Skates were prided on being self adjusted and the companies would often increase the superiority of their skates by referring to them as exclusive. In the winter season the paper began publishing articles related to the season, such as the common cold. An article about the common cold was published in the paper December 7th, 1864. This article explained that colds were caused by one’s own carelessness and a way to explain how to prevent a cold was to stay away from a cool draft. The common cold was not yet identified in the 1860’s so for the people of the time there was still a lot of mystery surrounding this sickness. In conclusion December of 1864 would have been a time for advertising and sales, and a time of discovering the mysteries of effects that the changing of the season has on one’s self.

 

Here is a sampling of the headlines:

 

Oshawa December 20th 1864

Hurrah for Murdoch Brothers

A Merry Christmas and Happy New Year for all!

Murdoch brothers have received a splendid lot of layer, bunch, Valencia and Sultana Raisins.

Currants , Figs, preserved Ginger, preserved Peaches, Quinces, Candid Lemon, Orange, and Citron Peel, Soft Shell Almonds, Pickles, Sauces, Lobsters, Sardines, Chocolate, Cocoa, Choice Teas, Pure Coffee, And everything which can assist in making the Christmas Merry and the New Year Joyous.

Hurrah for Murdoch Brothers
Hurrah for Murdoch Brothers

 

Oshawa December 21st 1864

Books for Christmas

J.F WIllex, Bookseller,

Opposite the post office, Oshawa, has just received a new and assortment of Photograph Albums, Pew and Pocket Bibles. Also the Poetical works of Milton, Pope, Byron, Rurn Lougfellow, Cowper, Monigomery, Campbell, Coleridge and others in elegant gift bindings.

 

Oshawa December 21st 1864

Christmas- We hope all our friends will enjoy a merry Christmas. It comes on a Sabbath this year, but we understand that all business places will be closed on Monday, so that all hands may enjoy themselves as usual. Our advertisements columns contain a number of seasonable announcements.

 

1864 ad

The Month That Was – November 1929

Wednesday November  6,1929

Married Girl He Rescued

Married three months ago to Miss Edna Bauman whom he saved from drowning at King’s Dock, Ont., on the St. Lawrence River, on August 22. 1928, Elmer G. Costich, 24, of Rochester was notified Saturday that he had been awarded a bronze medal by the Carnegie Hero Fund commission for his heroic act.

When notified that he had been awarded the bronze medal Costich revealed that he had married the girl whom he saved from drowning three months ago. The drowning fatality in which Miss Marian B. Bauman, sister of Miss Bauman, and John L .Burns, 23, both of Rochester lost their lives in the St. Lawrence River will be recalled by many here.

 

Thursday November 7, 1929

Hunter Mistaken For Duck

Duck hunting has its perils, too, as Mr. A. J. Wood recently discovered. It may not be as dangerous as being mistaken for a deer or a moose but a hail of “B-B’s” doesn’t make one feel any too comfortable. Last week Mr. Wood was out in his canoe when a duck, flying low over water passed between him and a man in another canoe not far distant. The second man raised his gun and fired. The dick flew on but many of the lead pellets from the gun passed close to Mr. Wood and a few struck him. By that time they didn’t have force enough to do serious harm, but one passed through his right ear and another through his upper lip knocking out a tooth.

 

Friday November 15, 1929

Doctor Dies After Dental Operation

Collapsing after undergoing a dental operation, Dr. Raoul Chevrier, 42, well known surgeon, died at his home her yesterday. The operation was for the extraction of teeth. Dr Chevrier came through the anaesthetic successfully only to collapse five minutes later. He died despite the efforts of fellow doctors to revive him by administering oxygen.

 

Wednesday November 20, 1929

Editorial Notes

One might almost believe that summer is here again – judging by the weekend lists of automobile accidents.

 

Wednesday November 20, 1929

Monogrammed Bags

Monograms are smart as can be on new bags. The chic thing is to have tiny initials, simple as can be but squarish or oval in design, on the handle or strap or fastening, either in silver or gold. One black crepe de chine Chinese bag has yellow and green initials.

 

Wednesday November 20, 1929

Princes Receives Castle As Gift

The wedding gift of King Victor Emanuel to Prince Humbert and Princess Marie Jose of Belgium will be the Chateau of Racconigi, in Pledmont , the birth place of the Crown Prince, Popolo di Roma said today.

The chateau was built as a fortress in 1004. It has a big park and lake and has been used as a summer residence for Italian royalties.

 

Wednesday November 20, 1929

She Awakens During “Wake”

During a “wake” over the “corpse” of an aged woman at Mullahoran, Irish Free State, recently, she suddenly sat up in bed. Many mourners fled in terror. The women had been ill for a long time, and apparently died in the usual way. Neighbors and friends from all the mountainous district gathered for the “wake”. She had been in a cataleptic sleep and lived for two days after her awakening.

 

Thursday November 21, 1929

Editorial Notes

Oshawa’s Little Theatre is deserving of far more support than it is actually being given. It amazing how slow people are to support a worthwhile movement in their own community.

 

Monday November 25, 1929

Lost 400 Years, Painting Found

“The Lost Raphael” the original painting of the “Madonna of Saint Salvi” for which art experts have been searching, has been found here, according to several art connoisseurs. The painting, said to have been one of the master’s finest, has been missing four centuries.

 

Monday November 25, 1929

Boy Had Narrow Escape

While playing on the street in Warkworth, Harold Clayton, four-year-old son of Henry Clayton, of Belleville, narrowly escaped serious injury when he became confused and dashed directly in front of an auto driven by Ben Ewing of Oshawa, formally town clerk of Cobourg. The car knocked the boy down and passed completely over him but fortunately the wheels missed the lad’s body. A few bruises and soiled clothing were the extent of the injuries.

The Month That Was – October 1956

Monday October 1, 1956

Theatre Guide

Plaza – “Edge of Hell” 1:05, 3:42, 6:19, and 9:01

“Day of Fury” 2:20, 4:57, 7:34 and 10:16.

Last complete show 9pm

Regent – “Great Day in the Morning” in Superscope and colour 3:15, 6:30 and 9:55

“Flying Leathernecks” 1:30, 4:50 and 8:15.

Last complete show at 8:05

Biltmore – “The Trouble with Harry” in VistaVision and colour 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, and 10:20

“View from Pompey’s Head” in CinemaScope and Colour 2:10, 5:25, 8:45

Last complete show at 8:45

Marks – “Bread, Love, and Dreams” 1:15, 4:10, 7:00 and 9:55

“Out of this World” 2:45, 5:40, and 8:40

Last complete show at 8:40

Drive –In – “Phantom from 10,000 Leagues” 7:30 and 10:35

“Day the World Ended” 9:00

Last complete show at 9:00pm

 

Tuesday October 2, 1956

Baby Lion Gets Mother

A dog named Fuzzy joined the circus Monday with the job of nursing a baby lion.

Fuzzy was grieving over the loss of a puppy, and the cub was trying to escape being killed by its mother when Huntington police got the two together. They hit it off fine.

The cub’s mother belongs to a travelling animal show. She killed cubs she had once before, owner Eddie Kuhn said.

Lion cubs will not feed on a bottle, and their mothers rarely raise their young in a circus because of the nearby humans, Kuhn said. SO Fuzzy will travel with the troupe, nursing the cub about 30 days before returning to her owner here.

 

Tuesday October 2, 1956

10-Year-Old Girl Steals Boy Baby

Four month old Danny Shaw and his carriage disappeared Monday.

Police, aided by taxi drivers and motorists, found the boy an hour later.

The “kidnapper?”  a 10 year old girl. She told the police she was lonesome and wanted a little brother. Police turned her over to juvenile and family court authorities.

 

Thursday October 11, 1956

Blind Mother Cares For Babe

Before her baby was born, Mrs. Joseph Kezac had many telephone calls- come callers saying she shouldn’t be having the baby at all, and others offering to adopt it.

The callers knew that pretty, blonde Mrs. Kezac was blind, but they needn’t worried. She took lessons on baby care from a member of the Victorian Order of Nurses, using a doll as a model, and her husband read books on baby care to her. Now she is successfully looking after her seven-weeks-old daughter, besides doing the housework.

Mrs. Kezac, 26 became blind from a head injury five years ago, before she was married.

 

Thursday October 11, 1956

Australian Swimmer, 17-Year-Old Boy, Sets New 400-Metre Mark

Murray Rose 17-year-old Sydney swimmer, was clocked in four minutes 29.2 seconds Tuesday in an unpaced 400-metre training swim on the long course at Brisbane pool.

This is the first time 4 ½ minutes has been bettered for the 400 metres over the long course.

 

Monday October 15, 1956

Lucky Find

A 20-year-old girl who had been engaged just three days lost her diamond ring in a busy London shopping centre. She found it an hour later where it had fallen on the sidewalk, unnoticed by thousands of shoppers.

 

Monday October 15, 1956

Monster Lobster

An 11-pound, 10 ounce lobster was caught on a rod and line by a fisherman here. The Brighton aquarium asked if they could exhibit the lobster, measuring four feet, four inches, but it had already been cooked and eaten.

 

Thursday October 23, 1956

Editorial Notes

One of the easiest ways to deflate the ego of parents is to ask them to help with the children’s homework – or even try it.

 

Thursday October 23, 1956

British Church has Ghost For Organist

TORQUAY, England – The vicar says that when Henry plays the organ in vine – covered St. John’s Church the music is something, but you can’t help noticing you can see right through him.

The vicar, Rev. Anthony Rouse, reported the matter last night to the Church of England’s fellowship for Psychical Study.

The ghost is supposed to be Henry Ditton Newman, a former church organist who died as a young man in 1883.

“I myself have heard the organ play twice at night. I can’t tell you the music. It is sweet, but sort of heavy.”

A former vicar, Rev. Sir Patrick Ferguson-Davie, thinks Henry will always be around.

“Unusual ghost in a way,” Sir Patrick said. “He is very happy. He doesn’t want to go away.”

Month That Was – September 1948

Thursday September 2, 1948

Sun Skips Vancouver

Last month was the dullest August in Vancouver history, the Dominion Weather Bureau reported today. There were only 130 hours of sunshine compared with a 40 year average of 262. The previous “dull” was the August of 1944 when 180 sunlit hours were recorded.

 

Friday September 3, 1948

Knife Nicks Neck of Girl in Act

Alice Orton, target in a vaudeville knife-throwing act, narrowly escaped death Thursday night when her father missed his aim and nicked her neck.

The fourth of eight 13-inch knives which are supposed to outline Miss Orton’s sharply figure on a circular board, went a few inches wild and struck her neck, during a wild-west show at the open-air theatre.

Her father, “Tex” Orton, carried on with the act and threw the remaining four knives. She said it was the third close call she has had in the act’s 20 years.

 

Saturday September 4, 1948

Baby Brought Back To Life

A mother here now knows why May 13 spoke of her infant as a “miracle baby.”

Trudy was born to Mrs. Margaret Nystom with “RH” antibodies active in her blood. During postnatal surgery when the RH-laden blood was replaced by “replacement transfusions” the infant’s heart stopped for five minutes and her respiration for 30.

Trudy was delivered by caesarean operation her heart stopped and respiration ceased. To all appearances the child was dead.

Adrenalin brought the heart back into motion, the operation was completed and the child placed in an incubator. It was 30 minutes before respiration resumed.

 

Tuesday September 14, 1948

Known in 6,000 B.C.

Stockholm – (CP) – Hunters and fishermen roamed the forests of central Sweden 6,000 years before Christ, Sten Follorin, young Swedish scientist said in a paper published here recently. The first traces if peasant culture appeared about 3,000 B.C., he said.

 

Tuesday September 14, 1948

Scare for Fisherman

Folkestone, England – (CP) –  A naval mine disposal squad made harmless a 500-pound British sea mine caught in the nets of a Folkestone fishing boat in the English Channel.

 

Monday September 20, 1948

Find “Nudists”

Vancouver – (CP) – Police summoned by phone to a wharf here found two reported “nudists” fully dressed. The mother of the two girls, aged two and three, admitted they’d eluded her at bedtime earlier.

 

Monday September 20 1948

Drunk, Can’t Drive Again for 60 Years

Poole, Dorset, England – (CP) – It’ll be 60 years before Cyril Benham, 27 will be allowed to drive an automobile again.

That was the sentence he got for driving under the influence of liquor. It was alleged he collided with a wall twice, crashed into a closed railroad crossing and wound up against a porch.

 

Thursday September 23, 1948

Cheese Factory Burns

Brockville- Seot.23 – (CP) A Wednesday night fire virtually destroyed the 38-year-old cheese factory at the village of Philipsville, 29 miles northwest of here.  Volunteer firefighters from the village and the volunteer group from neighboring Delta, were able to do little to save the building because of lack of water. Origin of the blaze was unknown. Some equipment and all but the day’s make of cheese were removed.

 

Monday September 27, 1948

Giant Wasp’s Nest

An unusually large wasp’s nest was found by R.G. Saunders, 280 Celina Street, in a beech tree on Park Road North. The nest, mottled grey and brown in color, was pear shaped and measured 15 inches in diameter. It was turned over to Arthur Slyfield librarian of the O.C.V.I.

Month That Was – July 1930

Wednesday July 2, 1930

Pickpocket Suspect Caught At Races

Hamilton, July 2 – Arrested by Inspector Ward of the City of Toronto, and Constable Lyell, of the Hamilton race track, at the Hamilton Jockey Club, yesterday, William Blair, Detroit was remanded on a charge of vagrancy in police court this morning. The officers picked him up after a complaint by a racing man who felt a hand in his pocket and turned to see Blair walking away.

 

Thursday July 3, 1930

Editorial Notes

A New York man killed himself in a theatre. This is carrying dramatics too far. – Chatham News

 

Friday July 4, 1930

Editorial Notes

“Are there any modern day witches?” asks a writer. We haven’t noticed anybody flying about on vacuum-cleaners in our district. – Punch

 

Saturday July 5, 1930

Chimney is Trap to Catch Burglar Entering Store

Saint John, July 5 – Tightly wedged 30 feet down inside the chimney of the N.B. liquor store building on Main Street, William C. Stackhouse shouted two hours for aid yesterday, before police located the source of his smothered cries. Firemen and police extricated him by cutting a gap in the wall and removing chimney bricks.

Charged with breaking and entering the liquor store with intent to steal, Stackhouse pleaded guilty and was given two years in Dorchester penitentiary by Acting Magistrate Williams in police court.

Police said Stackhouse tried to enter the liquor store via the skylight. He had fallen into the chimney and had been unable to climb out.

 

Thursday July 10, 1930

Britain Has Banned Apples From U.S.

Toronto, July 9-A.M. Wiseman, British Trade Commissioner in Canada for Ontario, has received official information from the British Government of an order just issued prohibiting the importation of raw apples from the United States into the United Kingdom, between July 7 and Nov. 15, with the exception of certain fancy grades.

Mr. Wiseman has no information as to why the ban is placed, but it was learned from other sources that it may be due to a fruit fly, known in the United States as the “railroad borer”, which is not believed to be in England.

 

Thursday July 10, 1930

Cheese makers to Compete

Kingston – A very comprehensive competition for the cheese makers of Frontenac County has been organized and five trophies and over $200 in prize money has been obtained. The object of the competition is to stimulate more interest in the dairy industry.

 

Thursday July 10, 1930

Unusual Bible

Kinston – A most unusual book is that owned by Mrs. W. Ashton of 45 King Street West, this city. It is a history of the Bible, printed by H. & E. Phinney, Cooperstown, N.Y., in 1829 and the pages measure only one inch by one and a half inches.  The volume is bound in leather and is in remarkably good state of preservation. The print is very clear and the volume is illustrated by small wood cuts. It is believed to be the only book of its kind in existence and Mrs. Ashton has refused some very high offers for it.

 

Monday July 21, 1930

Young Tree-sitter Injured in Fall

Hamilton, July 21 – Inspired by reports of many and wonderful endurance contests Lionel Clause decided to make a name as a tree sitter for himself.

He started by climbing to the top of a tree in his back yard, but his name now appears in print not because he shattered existing records, but because he slipped. The lad sustained a compound fracture of the skull and is in general hospital in a serious condition.

 

Thursday July 31, 1930

Editorial Notes:

The next man who suggests having a contest in hot weather should be tapped on the head with a large mallet

Editorial Notes:

Some people seem to have all the luck. Here’s one chap getting his picture in all the the papers just because he is wanted by the police.

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