Month That Was … May 1929

Saturday May 4, 1929

Family is Saved as Child Coughs

Guelph, May 4 – Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Johnston, 14th concession of Peel, and their three children narrowly escaped being burned to death in a fire that destroyed their home and all its contents. Mrs. Johnston found the house on fire and aroused her husband. Wrapping the children in comforters, they climbed out a back window onto a kitchen roof and making their way to a woodshed below, dropped to the ground.

 

Human Chess

Ramsgate – Human chess was played here recently as a feature of the Kent Country Chess association meet.

The players sat on top of lawn tennis umpire seats.

Fifty boys, all masters of chess themselves, were used as “pieces” in three great games of chess in which mighty mean of this “moving” pastime took part. One of these players was the world-famous champion, Capablanca himself.

Capablanca on a stool calling out his moves to the living boy pawns and kings and bishops was a sight to which all chess-loving Ramsgate flocked.

The mayor gave a reception to the chess association members, by way of start-off for a week’s congress and living chess was the feature of the meeting.

 

Thursday May 9, 1929

Helped Boy on Way

Kingston, May 9 – Just out in this country six months and suffering from lonesomeness, Frederick George Edwards, aged 15, a bright looking chap, wandered into the office of Mayor W.H. Craig at the City Hall at noon today, and bursting into tears, stated that he wanted to go home to his mother in Liverpool. After making inquiries regarding the lad, Mayor Craig gave him a railway pass as far as Montreal, and upon arrival there the youngster will report at the immigration office and ask to be sent home.

 

Friday May 10, 1929

Chilly Rescue by Girl Swimmer

Ottawa, May 10 – Without so much as removing her gloves or overcoat, Miss Gladys Smirle dived into the chilly waters of the Rideau Canal to save 5-year-old Jack Macdonnell from drowning yesterday. Miss Smirle formerly was a star member of the Ottawa Collegiate Aquatic Team. It took her less than a minute to dive from the Bronson Bridge, clutch the child as he was sinking and safely bring him home to shore.

The boy fell into the water from a pier of the bridge on which he was playing.

 

Saturday May 11, 1929

Kitten shows its Liking for the Prince

London – A kitten Saturday selected, of all the gathering of the “Toch H” was veterans society in Church House, Westminster, the Prince of Wales with which to make friends. Delegates from all Britain present to see the Prince light the lamps of maintenance for new branches let their attention wander when the animal jumped on the arm of the chair of the Prince, and showed lively pleasure at his stroking its head.

Once the Kitten deserted the Prince for a caress from Field Marshal Lord Plumer, but soon returned to the heir to the throne, and slept in his chair for the remainder of the meeting.

 

Monday May 13, 1929

Editor’s Comments:

The Younger Generation

It is odd that of all the critics of youth who go on earning their weekly guineas by tapping out on their typewriters the old tale of cocktails late nights, immodest speech and scanty clothing not one, so far as I am aware, her pointed out the one fundamental failing of the whole of the younger generation – that is their almost complete lack of any qualitative standards. They spend half their lives learning which side of their bread is buttered when they cannot tell the difference between butter and margarine.

 

Monday May 13, 1929

Girl Meets Wolf

Apsley – Miss Amy Lean filled the role of a modern Red Riding Hood on Tuesday afternoon when walking through a fellow close to the house, she came face to face with a large wolf. Only a few yards separated them, but owing probably to the fact that the lady was accompanied by her dog, unlike the wolf of the fairy tale, it evinced no interest for a closer acquaintanceship, but retreated to the woods, much to her relief.

The Month That Was… March 1922

From the Oshawa Daily Reformer

Thursday March 2, 1922:

Daughter Had to help Mother

-Now can do all her housework alone because Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable compound helped her.

Jasper, Minn, – “I saw in the paper about Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable Compound and took it because I was having such pains in my stomach and through my back that I could not do my work. I had tried other medicines, but none did me the good that your Vegetable Compound did. Now I am able to do all my work alone while before I had my daughter staying at home to do it. I have told a number of friends what it has done for me and give you permission to use my letter as a testimonial.” – Mrs. Jesse Patterson

There is no better reason for your trying Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable Compound than this- it has helped other women. So if you suffer from displacements, irregularities, backache, nervousness or are passing through the Changes of Life remember this splendid medicine. What it did for Mrs. Patterson it may do for you.

Good time For Walking

Providence Journal: Spring and the late autumn are undoubtedly the most popular seasons for walking. But at this time of the year when the snow crunches with weird sounds under the heel and the winter wind has a vigor-stirring sting in it, the walker may experience joys that have a meaning all their own. The man who walks the trodden and untrodden paths these days for the love of it need not worry much about his health.

Women are Against Travelling Carnivals

The Local Council of Women in a letter to the town Council Tuesday evening at the special meeting, heartily endorsed the stand taken by Chief of Police Friend a few weeks ago regarding the banning from the town of travelling carnivals.

The ladies asked the Town Council to endorse the stand taken by the chief, pointing out that not only did these carnivals take away a lot of money from the town and leave very little behind, but they also had an evil influence. The letter was referred by the council to the License Committee.

Saturday March 4, 1922:

Train Derailed At Whitby Today

Passengers from Oshawa intending to take the 2.50 G.T.R train points east had a long wait this afternoon.

A freight train was derailed at Whitby early in the afternoon, and the cars blocked all east bound traffic. At 4.30 o’clock this afternoon local G.T.R officials ‘had no idea when the track would be cleared, or when the passenger train would arrive. The non-arrival of the train also caused inconvenience to The reformer and delayed publication of the paper, as cuts intended for today’s paper were expected in the Toronto mail.

 

Editorial Comment

Even in the age of the women citizen one of the surest approaches to the male heart is the “line” that begins : “Oh, Mr. Jones, I don’t know a thing about politics, so won’t you please tell me what you think?”

Tuesday March 7, 1922:

Coming events

-Irish Concert March 17, Regent Theatre

-Engel’s Bargain Basement, opens Thursday morning with sensational bargains

-The Adanac Orchestra are holding a dance next Friday night in the Engel’s Assembly Hall

-Scientific Palmist – has read the hands of hundreds of distinguished people. Here all this week. Central Hotel, Room 6, hours 10 to 9: terms $1.00

Tuesday March 14, 1922:

 Presented Bride With Casserole

Gathered together at the home of Mrs. William Questard, Whiting Ave., last Wednesday evening, and presented her with a beautiful casserole on the occasion of her marriage to Mr. Questard on March 4.

Wednesday evening was most enjoyable spent, whist being played part of the evening, for which prizes were given for the highest and lowest scores and the prize winners were Mrs. Chas. Holder, ladies first, and Mr. H. Carter, gentlemen’s first, and the ladies lowest prize was won by Mrs. Lottie Thompson and the gentlemen’s lowest went to Mr. Chas. Tuson. Afterwards a nice lunch was served by Mrs. Questard and the evening finished up with a few songs.