Month That Was – March 1926

Don’t forget! You can discover more about the Month That Was March 1926 by viewing the newspapers online at Canadian Community Digital Archives. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Government of Canada for this project.


The Ontario Daily Reformer
Bus Enters Ditch to Avoid Auto
Edition 04 March, 1926

Bus Owner Lays Charge Against C. H. Read for Recklessness

A Whitby-Oshawa bus ran into the ditch on the Kingston Road at Gibbons street shortly after seven o’clock this morning, when Harold Dalton, the driver, attempted to avoid striking a car driven by C. H. Read, 96 Gibbons street, when it turned on to the Kingston road off Gibbons street. The bus went on its side in the ditch. There were about 18 passengers in the bubs at the time, but none suffered injuries, outside of one man who sustained a scratched hand.

A charge of reckless driving has been laid against C. H. Read.

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The Ontario Daily Reformer
At Local Theatres
Edition 04 March, 1926

Meighen in “Irish Luck” Opens at Regent Tonight

The famous Blarney Stone – heralded for many years in song, poem and Irish tale – has been kissed by Thomas Meighen, the Paramount star who went to Erin to make “Irish Luck,” the Emerald Isle romance which opens a three-day engagement at the Regent this evening.

Such an event in of sufficient importance as to have the exact time of its accomplishment recorded. Hence be it noted that the kissing took place at five minutes after two o’clock on Tuesday, Aug. 18, 1925.

The Blarney Stone is located, as everyone should know, at Blarney Castle. T isn’t particularly difficult to kiss, but according to Irish Icre, its effect is very hard to get rid of. It is supposed to fill the kissee with a wonderful abundance of the stuff young girls are supposed to hear just as the love-sick age.

“Irish Luck,” a romantic-drama against a background of modern Erin, has a swift-moving plot, suspense, thrills and heart-interest – and more – it has Tom Meighan in a duel role. Tom Geraghty adapted the story from Norman Venner’s Saturday Evening Post serial, “An Imperfect Imposter.” Victor Heerman directed the production, which features Lois Wilson at the head of a strong supporting cast.

Arthur Stone in a rollicking comedy creation and “Call of the Game,” a short sports film will be added attractions as will Sam Collis and his Regent orchestra. 

 

The Ontario Daily Reformer
Second Annual High School Play
Edition 04 March, 1926

Those Taking Part Are Working Hard To Make It A Great Success

On Friday evening of this week the students of the Oshawa High School are presenting their second annual play and concert in the auditorium of the school. The first part of the entertainment will consist of selections by the Glee Club of the school. The club have been practicing faithfully and well since early fall and under the able tuition of Mr. Lyonde of the Hambourg Conservatory of Music have developed wonderfully. This part of the programme will be made up of solos, duets, quartets, and choruses and should be highly entertaining.

The second part of the evening’s entertainment will take the form of a play put on by students of the school. In the presenting of plays the local students have won themselves a place in the hearts of Oshawa people by their stellar work in the comedy “Mr. Bob,” which was put on last year. Probably no play given by amateur talent in Oshawa has attracted more favorable criticism and well-deserved applause than this play and on their reputation won last year the students should have a large audience on Friday night.

…The play is being directed by Ms. Adams who was in charge of last year’s production and o whom much of the credit for the excellent showing of the students last year was due. The details regarding costumes and setting are in the hands of Miss Tuttle, Miss Armstrong and Mr. Holme, all members of the High School staff who had charge of this work in the presenting of “Mr. Bob.”

The principal parts are being taken as follows: Mr. Pickwick, Maurice Hutchinson; Mrs. Bardell, Miss M. Hart; Mrs. Cluppins, Miss M. Anderson; Mrs. Sanders, Miss L. Mundy; Mr Winkle, Donald Crothers; Sergent Buzzfuzz, Manning Swartz; Sergeant Snubbins, Hartland Callaghan; the Judge, Irwin Deyman, and the Clerk, James Kinnear.

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The Ontario Daily Reformer
Grape Market Has Not Been Injured
Canadian Press
Edition 04 March, 1926

Despite Fears Following the Adoption of Prohibition

San Francisco, Mar. 4. – Six years of grape growing in California under national prohibition have proven unfounded fears of vineyard owners that abolition of the saloon would injure the market for their product.

Shipments of grapes from this state have increased from 21,605 cars in 1919 to 72,116 last year.

Statistics of the Agricultural Economics bureau of the department of agriculture do not distinguish between so-called “wine” and “table” grapes. Therefore, they do not show whether it is hunger or thirst that caused the more than 300 percent increase in the demand of other states for the product of California vineyards.

…As the California grapegrower takes stock of his last year’s business and looks to the coming season with inquisitive eye “Winehaven” before prohibition referred to as the world’s largest storage centre for wine, is being dismantled. It was built immediately after the San Franscisco fire of 1906 on a seven-acre tract on Point San Pablo at a cost of $3,5000,000 including cottages for 200 employees. The winery had vats and cellars with a total capacity of 9,500,000 gallons. When filled, its stock had a value of $10,000,000.

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The Oshawa Junior Reformer
Children Help Children
A.S.
Edition 06, March, 1926

We wish to call the attention of all our readers to the special article (on the front page of this issue by Mr. George Speedie of Toronto, Superintendent of the Missionary Department of the Upper Canada Tracts Society’s Mission to Soldiers, Sailors, and Lighthouse Keepers etc.

I am sure all of young Oshawa feel proud to have had the chance to bring happiness to so many people and to merit the hearty thanks of Mr. Speedie.

Everyone of us knows the pleasure to be gotten from the reading of books. Living, as we do, with well-stocked libraries at hand we cannot realize what it is like to be without books and magazines to read.

To my mind, the most pleasing feature of this donation of books by the girls and boys of Oshawa is that a great many of the books have been given by girls and boys to girls and boys.

This readiness to help others is what we admire. A.S.

 

The Oshawa Junior Reformer
St. Gregory’s School Rink
Edition 06, March, 1926

The boys of St. Gregory’s School made a fine little rink which was enjoyed by not only by our own school but also by others. There were many hockey games played on it. In some of the games, the players looked like professionals. But some of the smartest games were those played by the Primary Classes; in one game the latter won by a close score, after a hard fought game.

The girls also enjoyed the rink. They held a skating party on Feb. 8, and skated until they were tired. Then they went to the hall where they were served a lunch. At last, they returned home tired but happy after their outing.

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The Oshawa Junior Reformer
Games to Play and Tricks to Preform
Edition 06, March, 1926

A Magic Trick

This clever mathematical trick, by which you can tell the month and the year of a person’s birth, will startle many of your friends says “The American Boy Magazine” Tell your friend to put down the number of the month in which he was born, multiply it by two, then add five, multiply by fifty, add his age, subtract 365, and then add 115. The two figures on the right will tell you his age, the REMAINDER will be the number of the month of his birth. For example, if the total is 615, he is fifteen years old and was born in June.

Fiesta Week – The History Behind the Culture, Dancing, and Food!

It’s the week the City of Oshawa looks forward to all year…Fiesta Week!

Formerly known as Fanfare for Oshawa, the early beginnings of Fiesta Week can be traced back to a one night folk performance for Mother’s Day in 1961 organized by then president of the Oshawa Folk Arts Council Josephine Aldwinkle.  In 1972, the first week-long celebration of international cuisine and culture, the establishment of Fiesta Week, presented by the not-for-profit organization Oshawa Folks Arts Council. With each passing year, Fiesta Week organizers have stayed true to their mission of demonstrating Oshawa’s rich cultural mosaic.

Fiesta Week takes place annually during the third week of June and opens each year with a parade. Floats, marching bands, dancing groups and clowns follow the parade route through the city of Oshawa. Crowned the evening before at the Queen’s Court Ball, Miss Fiesta is a highlight of the parade. Awards are presented to those groups with the best ethnic group float, best community group float, and best overall float.  As the parade comes to a close at Memorial Park, a free Fiesta Week concert commences.

Oshawa and District Historical Society Fiesta Float, 1981
Oshawa and District Historical Society Fiesta Float, 1981

Through the remainder of the week, ethnic pavilions across the city open their doors to the public. Each pavilion requires a passport to enter, making each visitor feel like a true globe trotter.  Revelers can stop by the Caribbean Nights (Caribbean) pavilion for roti and patties, continue onto the Loreley (German) pavilion for schnitzel, sauerkraut, and sausage, and finished the evening with souvlaki and baklava at Acropolis (Greek). Other favourites include borscht and cabbage rolls at the Lviv and Dnipro/Odessa (Ukrainian) pavilion and lasagna and ravioli at the Roma (Italian) pavilion. The Budapest (Hungarian), Africa Pavilian, French-Canadian, and Krakow and Poznan (Polish) pavilions, among many others, also offer delectable treats.

Orchestrating a week-long festival is no small undertaking. The event organizers begin planning in January and February, providing 6 months to arrange the best possible Fiesta Week experience. Maintaining an event such as this on volunteer staff alone is a huge feat. With a lot of work to be done and only so many bodies to do the work, one major obstacle faced by coordinators of the event is limited event volunteers. Another hurdle is arranging for bands and entertainers that come from outside the Oshawa area. With increasing gas prices, it is more difficult for entertainers to travel to Oshawa from other areas of the GTA. Despite these challenges, Fiesta Week has occurred annually for over 30 years.

Be sure to visit fiestaweek.ca for more information on this much anticipated community event!

Downtown Oshawa: Our Hidden Heritage

Oshawa’s downtown core is centred around King and Simcoe Streets, or, as many locals call it, the Four Corners.  This area was first settled by a man named John Kerr who purchased 200 acres at the northwest corner of King and Simcoe Streets in 1816.  For many years, the settlement was called Kerr’s Creek.

In the 1830s, local merchant, Edward Skae opened a popular general store at the corner of Simcoe and King Streets and the hamlet soon became known as Skae’s Corners.  In 1842, Edward Skae made application to the legislature for a post office.  He received a reply that a name other than “Corners” must be chosen for the post office as there were already too many place names containing ‘Corners.’  The name Oshawa was chosen and translates from the native dialect to mean ‘that point at the crossing of the stream where the canoe was exchanged for the trail.

Edward Skae's checkered store
Edward Skae’s checkered General Store

Oshawa’s downtown has seen several changes since it was settled almost 200 years ago.  Some of the heritage buildings are lost, some still stand, although they would be unrecognizable to early settlers, while a few buildings have remained steadfast through the years, as beloved as they were when they were first constructed.

On June 9, 2013, the Oshawa Museum is excited to host the return of the Downtown Walking Tour, highlighting the heritage than can be found around the Four Corners.  The tour will depart from the Oshawa Public Library, McLaughlin Branch (65 Bagot Street), at 12PM.

This walking tour is expected to take 1.5-2 hours in length.  The cost is $3 per person or FREE for members of the Oshawa Historical Society.

Please be sure to join us for a stroll through our Downtown Heritage!