Month That Was – July 1930

Wednesday July 2, 1930

Pickpocket Suspect Caught At Races

Hamilton, July 2 – Arrested by Inspector Ward of the City of Toronto, and Constable Lyell, of the Hamilton race track, at the Hamilton Jockey Club, yesterday, William Blair, Detroit was remanded on a charge of vagrancy in police court this morning. The officers picked him up after a complaint by a racing man who felt a hand in his pocket and turned to see Blair walking away.

 

Thursday July 3, 1930

Editorial Notes

A New York man killed himself in a theatre. This is carrying dramatics too far. – Chatham News

 

Friday July 4, 1930

Editorial Notes

“Are there any modern day witches?” asks a writer. We haven’t noticed anybody flying about on vacuum-cleaners in our district. – Punch

 

Saturday July 5, 1930

Chimney is Trap to Catch Burglar Entering Store

Saint John, July 5 – Tightly wedged 30 feet down inside the chimney of the N.B. liquor store building on Main Street, William C. Stackhouse shouted two hours for aid yesterday, before police located the source of his smothered cries. Firemen and police extricated him by cutting a gap in the wall and removing chimney bricks.

Charged with breaking and entering the liquor store with intent to steal, Stackhouse pleaded guilty and was given two years in Dorchester penitentiary by Acting Magistrate Williams in police court.

Police said Stackhouse tried to enter the liquor store via the skylight. He had fallen into the chimney and had been unable to climb out.

 

Thursday July 10, 1930

Britain Has Banned Apples From U.S.

Toronto, July 9-A.M. Wiseman, British Trade Commissioner in Canada for Ontario, has received official information from the British Government of an order just issued prohibiting the importation of raw apples from the United States into the United Kingdom, between July 7 and Nov. 15, with the exception of certain fancy grades.

Mr. Wiseman has no information as to why the ban is placed, but it was learned from other sources that it may be due to a fruit fly, known in the United States as the “railroad borer”, which is not believed to be in England.

 

Thursday July 10, 1930

Cheese makers to Compete

Kingston – A very comprehensive competition for the cheese makers of Frontenac County has been organized and five trophies and over $200 in prize money has been obtained. The object of the competition is to stimulate more interest in the dairy industry.

 

Thursday July 10, 1930

Unusual Bible

Kinston – A most unusual book is that owned by Mrs. W. Ashton of 45 King Street West, this city. It is a history of the Bible, printed by H. & E. Phinney, Cooperstown, N.Y., in 1829 and the pages measure only one inch by one and a half inches.  The volume is bound in leather and is in remarkably good state of preservation. The print is very clear and the volume is illustrated by small wood cuts. It is believed to be the only book of its kind in existence and Mrs. Ashton has refused some very high offers for it.

 

Monday July 21, 1930

Young Tree-sitter Injured in Fall

Hamilton, July 21 – Inspired by reports of many and wonderful endurance contests Lionel Clause decided to make a name as a tree sitter for himself.

He started by climbing to the top of a tree in his back yard, but his name now appears in print not because he shattered existing records, but because he slipped. The lad sustained a compound fracture of the skull and is in general hospital in a serious condition.

 

Thursday July 31, 1930

Editorial Notes:

The next man who suggests having a contest in hot weather should be tapped on the head with a large mallet

Editorial Notes:

Some people seem to have all the luck. Here’s one chap getting his picture in all the the papers just because he is wanted by the police.

Month That Was … May 1929

Saturday May 4, 1929

Family is Saved as Child Coughs

Guelph, May 4 – Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Johnston, 14th concession of Peel, and their three children narrowly escaped being burned to death in a fire that destroyed their home and all its contents. Mrs. Johnston found the house on fire and aroused her husband. Wrapping the children in comforters, they climbed out a back window onto a kitchen roof and making their way to a woodshed below, dropped to the ground.

 

Human Chess

Ramsgate – Human chess was played here recently as a feature of the Kent Country Chess association meet.

The players sat on top of lawn tennis umpire seats.

Fifty boys, all masters of chess themselves, were used as “pieces” in three great games of chess in which mighty mean of this “moving” pastime took part. One of these players was the world-famous champion, Capablanca himself.

Capablanca on a stool calling out his moves to the living boy pawns and kings and bishops was a sight to which all chess-loving Ramsgate flocked.

The mayor gave a reception to the chess association members, by way of start-off for a week’s congress and living chess was the feature of the meeting.

 

Thursday May 9, 1929

Helped Boy on Way

Kingston, May 9 – Just out in this country six months and suffering from lonesomeness, Frederick George Edwards, aged 15, a bright looking chap, wandered into the office of Mayor W.H. Craig at the City Hall at noon today, and bursting into tears, stated that he wanted to go home to his mother in Liverpool. After making inquiries regarding the lad, Mayor Craig gave him a railway pass as far as Montreal, and upon arrival there the youngster will report at the immigration office and ask to be sent home.

 

Friday May 10, 1929

Chilly Rescue by Girl Swimmer

Ottawa, May 10 – Without so much as removing her gloves or overcoat, Miss Gladys Smirle dived into the chilly waters of the Rideau Canal to save 5-year-old Jack Macdonnell from drowning yesterday. Miss Smirle formerly was a star member of the Ottawa Collegiate Aquatic Team. It took her less than a minute to dive from the Bronson Bridge, clutch the child as he was sinking and safely bring him home to shore.

The boy fell into the water from a pier of the bridge on which he was playing.

 

Saturday May 11, 1929

Kitten shows its Liking for the Prince

London – A kitten Saturday selected, of all the gathering of the “Toch H” was veterans society in Church House, Westminster, the Prince of Wales with which to make friends. Delegates from all Britain present to see the Prince light the lamps of maintenance for new branches let their attention wander when the animal jumped on the arm of the chair of the Prince, and showed lively pleasure at his stroking its head.

Once the Kitten deserted the Prince for a caress from Field Marshal Lord Plumer, but soon returned to the heir to the throne, and slept in his chair for the remainder of the meeting.

 

Monday May 13, 1929

Editor’s Comments:

The Younger Generation

It is odd that of all the critics of youth who go on earning their weekly guineas by tapping out on their typewriters the old tale of cocktails late nights, immodest speech and scanty clothing not one, so far as I am aware, her pointed out the one fundamental failing of the whole of the younger generation – that is their almost complete lack of any qualitative standards. They spend half their lives learning which side of their bread is buttered when they cannot tell the difference between butter and margarine.

 

Monday May 13, 1929

Girl Meets Wolf

Apsley – Miss Amy Lean filled the role of a modern Red Riding Hood on Tuesday afternoon when walking through a fellow close to the house, she came face to face with a large wolf. Only a few yards separated them, but owing probably to the fact that the lady was accompanied by her dog, unlike the wolf of the fairy tale, it evinced no interest for a closer acquaintanceship, but retreated to the woods, much to her relief.

The Month That Was: April 1954

Thursday April 1, 1954

For Success in Business

What makes one less successful than he feels he should be?

Surveys at the Illinois Institute of Technology show that laziness is often the cause; if you’re well educated have a good vocabulary and are not applying yourself.

Sailors Friends of Orphans

OTTAWA (CP)-Canadian sailors on destroyers in the Far East have been spending some of their shore leave looking after orphans.

The Crusader recently entertained 70 youngsters from an orphanage on the island of Yang Pyong-Do, the navy said Wednesday and the Huron, on her last patrol before returning to Canada, left $110 and baskets of food and candy for the 30-odd children of Eden orphanage on Paengnyong-Do

The Haida, a navy release said, has taken up where the Huron left off. A recent patrol took her to Paengnyong-Do, and the destroyer’s chief and petty officers visited the one-room hut housing more than 30 children. They donated $20 and quantities of food, candy, nuts, soap, and toothpaste for the homeless young South Koreans.

Star-Gazer 14 years old

MONTREAL (CP)-Morton Fels, 14-years-old amateur astronomer has built a telescope with which he and his father can see the satellites around Jupiter and the craters on the moon.

Morton, a student at Westmount junior high, started 10 months ago to grind the mirror for his telescope. The work had to be done by hand and he estimates he spent 150 hours on the job.

He first learned from the Royal Astronomical Society that it was possible to build the telescope. Now is he is a member of that body.

Morton is no novice at making things. On his basement wall he has a contraption that feeds his guinea pigs automatically.

 

Monday April 5, 1954

Household Hint

To remove food from boiling water without burning the fingers, use a pair of tongs. Tongs are handy utensils to keep in your kitchen, not only fro removing articles from hot water, but getting olives out of bottles, and similar chores.

 

Saturday April 10, 1954

50 Year Promise Kept

CHICAGO (CP)-Fifty years ago, Alfred Arndt, 18, shook his head over the high price of a suit-15. Said the clothier, Max Hyman: “You buy that suit today, and 50 years from now I’ll give you one for nothing.” Friday Arndt, 68, appeared in Hyman’s store. Hyman, now in his 80s remembered the bargain. He invited Arndt to pick his free suit, and Arndt selected a $70 number.

 

Tuesday April 20, 1954

U.S to Probe Comic Books

NEW YORK (AP) – An investigation into “sadistic comic books and their impact upon adolescents” will be launched today by a U.S. Senate judiciary sub-committee on a juvenile delinquency.

Sunday Robert C. Hendrickson (Rep. N.J.) said Monday “we are conducting these hearings in New York, the heart of the comic book industry, because of the thousands of letters we have received in which the writers expressed deepest concern over comic books and other mass media of communication.”

Hendrickson said the sub-committee is “vitally interested n evaluating the impact of horror and crime comics … which glorify graft and corruption and ridicule honesty or produce fantastic pictures of violence, brutality and torture.”

 

Wednesday April 21, 1954

(Advertisement) Boys and Girls in Ontario This Pony could be yours

Now today … Enter the Little Joe Colouring Book Contest Open to all Ontario Children Under 12!

One pony for Ontario Girl – Grand Prize winner

One pony for Ontario Boy – Grand Prize winner

… Also as Ontario Regional Runner-up prizes, there are 12 brand new C.C.M. Bicycles

Entry form tells you all about it. If YOU are under 13, get your FREE entry form and Little Joe Colouring Book from your Langmuir Paints dealer … TODAY! Nothing to buy!

It’s easy! It’s fun! All you have to do is colour the LITTLE JOE COLOURING BOOK!

Every eligible child has a good chance to win!

And judges will consider ability according to age

There are six regions in Ontario … each with its own contest, for two brand new C.C.M. Bikes … and a chance to win Ontario Grand Prize of a pony.  Contest closes June 11th 1954. Winners announced June 26th 1954. Think how wonderful it would be to have your own PONY … or a brand new C.C.M. Bicycle!

And just think how much fun you could have this summer with a real little Shetland Pony all your very own … or a brand new Bicycle to go on picnics or a fishing trip with the gang.

The Month That Was… March 1922

From the Oshawa Daily Reformer

Thursday March 2, 1922:

Daughter Had to help Mother

-Now can do all her housework alone because Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable compound helped her.

Jasper, Minn, – “I saw in the paper about Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable Compound and took it because I was having such pains in my stomach and through my back that I could not do my work. I had tried other medicines, but none did me the good that your Vegetable Compound did. Now I am able to do all my work alone while before I had my daughter staying at home to do it. I have told a number of friends what it has done for me and give you permission to use my letter as a testimonial.” – Mrs. Jesse Patterson

There is no better reason for your trying Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable Compound than this- it has helped other women. So if you suffer from displacements, irregularities, backache, nervousness or are passing through the Changes of Life remember this splendid medicine. What it did for Mrs. Patterson it may do for you.

Good time For Walking

Providence Journal: Spring and the late autumn are undoubtedly the most popular seasons for walking. But at this time of the year when the snow crunches with weird sounds under the heel and the winter wind has a vigor-stirring sting in it, the walker may experience joys that have a meaning all their own. The man who walks the trodden and untrodden paths these days for the love of it need not worry much about his health.

Women are Against Travelling Carnivals

The Local Council of Women in a letter to the town Council Tuesday evening at the special meeting, heartily endorsed the stand taken by Chief of Police Friend a few weeks ago regarding the banning from the town of travelling carnivals.

The ladies asked the Town Council to endorse the stand taken by the chief, pointing out that not only did these carnivals take away a lot of money from the town and leave very little behind, but they also had an evil influence. The letter was referred by the council to the License Committee.

Saturday March 4, 1922:

Train Derailed At Whitby Today

Passengers from Oshawa intending to take the 2.50 G.T.R train points east had a long wait this afternoon.

A freight train was derailed at Whitby early in the afternoon, and the cars blocked all east bound traffic. At 4.30 o’clock this afternoon local G.T.R officials ‘had no idea when the track would be cleared, or when the passenger train would arrive. The non-arrival of the train also caused inconvenience to The reformer and delayed publication of the paper, as cuts intended for today’s paper were expected in the Toronto mail.

 

Editorial Comment

Even in the age of the women citizen one of the surest approaches to the male heart is the “line” that begins : “Oh, Mr. Jones, I don’t know a thing about politics, so won’t you please tell me what you think?”

Tuesday March 7, 1922:

Coming events

-Irish Concert March 17, Regent Theatre

-Engel’s Bargain Basement, opens Thursday morning with sensational bargains

-The Adanac Orchestra are holding a dance next Friday night in the Engel’s Assembly Hall

-Scientific Palmist – has read the hands of hundreds of distinguished people. Here all this week. Central Hotel, Room 6, hours 10 to 9: terms $1.00

Tuesday March 14, 1922:

 Presented Bride With Casserole

Gathered together at the home of Mrs. William Questard, Whiting Ave., last Wednesday evening, and presented her with a beautiful casserole on the occasion of her marriage to Mr. Questard on March 4.

Wednesday evening was most enjoyable spent, whist being played part of the evening, for which prizes were given for the highest and lowest scores and the prize winners were Mrs. Chas. Holder, ladies first, and Mr. H. Carter, gentlemen’s first, and the ladies lowest prize was won by Mrs. Lottie Thompson and the gentlemen’s lowest went to Mr. Chas. Tuson. Afterwards a nice lunch was served by Mrs. Questard and the evening finished up with a few songs.