The Month That Was – April 1871

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Vindicator

5 April 1871, page 2

The House of Commons have virtually passed the bill admitting British Columbia into the Confederation. She is to enter with three members in the Senate and six in the commons. The financial arrangement, however, are the important part of the agreement. By these terms it is proposed to allow British Columbia an annual allowance of $35,000; And eighty cents per head of the population until it reaches the maximum of 400,000; an ask the debt of the provinces small, interest will be allowed upon the difference between its actual debt and the proportional indebtedness of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick…. The dominion binds herself to secure the construction of a railway to the Pacific within 10 years; And the province hands over to the dominion about 16 million acres of land, for which she, in turn, will receive $100,000 a year in half yearly installments to be paid in advance. Then it is proposed to guarantee the interest for ten years, at 5% per annum, dating from the completion of the works on a sum not to exceed 100,000 pounds sterling for the construction of a first class graving dock at Esquimault. The railway is not to be constructed by the government, but by companies, who will receive land grants and a cash bonus amounting to about 10 millions. the government have guaranteed that its construction shall not increase the taxation of the country, and are to add a rider to the bill expressive of the manner in which the road is to be built. Without the road the mere Confederation would be a farce. If the construction of the intercolonial is justifiable, the construction of the Pacific is 10 times more so, for it opens up not only a country, but almost a continent to settlement.

5 April 1871, p1

12 April 1871, page 2

The roads this spring have not been as bad at least, but they have been in many places almost impossible. The reach road between Oshawa and Prince Albert, has been very bad in a few places and requires a considerable outlay. We are glad to know that the council of East Whitby intend an outlay of something like $1500 including the county grant upon it. This will make the portion within the limits of the Township very fair. A rich Township like this ought to have every concession line gravelled. The outly would be amply repaid in a year or two by the saving of time, waggons and horseflesh. The council of the Township has paid great attention to this subject, and we hope that as before the ratepayers will approve and support their enlightened policy, even should they be more liberal than of old.

The constable has issued his edict against cattle running at large, and the boys are ready to carry it into effect by impounding all stray livestock.

Stealing horses from the hotel sheds seems to have become an institution here. On Monday evening about half-past six, Mr. W. May drove his horse and wagon into Hines’ shed. At half-past eight he entered the shed and found his property gone. It has probably been taken northward. A full description will be found in our advertising columns.

$25 Reward
The above reward will be paid for the recovery or information leading to the recovery of my mare, light waggon, buffalo robe, and harness, stolen from the shed of Hines’ Hotel, Oshawa, last evening; and the apprehension of the thief. The mare is a light bay, nearly cream color, with dark mane and tail. She is five years old, and interferes in her hind legs. The waggon is a spring democrat, with name of maker (Lavis) on tail board.
WM May
Oshawa, April 11, 1871

newspaper advertisement for good for sale
12 April 1871 page 3

19 April 1871, page 2

Sometime last week the barns of Mr. Petrie, on the base line, and Mr. Phillips, Cedar Dale, were entered. From the former, 10 or 12 bushels of oats and some poultry, and from the latter, a bag of clover seed, were stolen. The farmers of East Whitby will yet have to form a vigilance club to bring to justice these burn robbers. Probably all the thieving is done by one or two residents, and a proper watch on any suspicious characters would put an end to their depredations.

That portion of Moore’s Hill, in the road between Oshawa and Whitby, belonging to West Whitby is in very bad condition. One or two places require to be cross trained an additional gravel placed upon it. We hope the townships will keep up the good work begun buy them on this hill. A road with so much travel ought to be made one of the best, instead of one of the worst roads in the country. If the four municipalities interested would enter into some concerted plan this could be done at no great expense. Great improvements have been made during the last two or three years, but there is much that remains to be done. Let the councils try the union plan. A committee from each council could meet in Whitby or Oshawa and unite upon a scheme to be adopted by their respective councils. The same committee might have power to revive the Union Burial Ground question and suggest a plan for carrying out the two long neglected idea of making a cemetery worthy of the municipalities’ interested.

The horse and waggon belonging to Mr. Wm. May stolen from Hines’ shed on Monday evening last was returned on Wednesday. The horse was found next morning in the shed of Taylor’s tavern, Raglan. The advertisement inserted in the vindicator by Mr. May, identified the property on Wednesday, and the property was at once returned to the owner. Whether it was actually stolen and the thief became afraid, or whether some reckless scoundrel took it to obtain a ride to Raglan is not known. It has been taken from the shed as the altered condition of the harness testified. We regret there is no clue to the thief.

Newspaper advertisement for tailoring
19 April 1871 page 2

26 April 1871, page 2

The street in front of Hines’ hotel, was the scene of a most disgraceful breach of the peace on Saturday evening. It appears that a feud has existed between a number of disorderly characters in Oshawa, known as the Herring Gang, and a number of similar characters residing to the east of the town. The consequences is, that if one of them falls under after dark among his opponents, he receives a sound beating. On Saturday night, both sides mustered in force to fight it out. Constable Gurley having received notice appeared on the scene and with some aid of peaceable citizens broke up the intended fight, for which however, the belligerence appeared to have no great stomach. The Oshawa rowdies afterward marched up and down street shouting until midnight. On Monday, warrants were issued for Thos. Law, Jas. Dovey, Michael Caulfield, W. O’Driscoll, Richard Richens, Geo. Wilson, farmer, Willard Vanderhodd and J. Bladwin, who were charged with being present and aiding and abetting in the row. O’Driscoll, Wilson and Baldwin, put in an appearance before the magistrate, WH Gibbs, Esq., yesterday. The case against Wilson broke down, and he was discharged. O’Driscoll denied a longing to the Herring Gang, but was fined $2 for not leaving the crowd when ordered to by Constable Gurley, and afterwards parading the streets with the gang. Baldwin was charged with inciting the parties to fight. He was fined $5 for his share in the riot. Baldwin appears not to be a member of the gang. Of those who did not appear, Richens was fined $2 and the others $5 each. The Herring Gang are so called from wearing a fish shaped badge on their breast. They are regularly organized and some of them carry firearms and loaded bludgeons. The village authorities are determined to break them up, and anyone arrested with a weapon will at once be committed for trial. It is absolutely necessary for the peace and safety of the town that this organization shall be destroyed. Already a counter organization is said to be forming and a nice lot of faction brawls will follow.

newspaper advertisement for furniture and undertaking business
26 April 1871 page 4

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