The Month That Was – January 1873

All articles originally appeared in the Ontario Reformer

January 3, 1873, page 1

Wool Prices – The great advance in the price of wool has led considers to expect a corresponding rise in Winter Goods. They will be agreeably disappointed when they visit this well known house. To find that the low prices of last year are still current in many of the leading lines. Piles of heavy Winceys at old prices. Stocks of Woolen Shawls at old prices. Thousands of yards of Flannels at old prices. Heaps of Dress Goods at old prices. Lots of Blankets at old prices, &c.,&c

Slates to be Abolished – A general war is being waged against the use of slates in the schools of Germany. There is scarcely any sound more offensive to the human ear than the grating of the pencil on the slate, and when this is multiplied by the numbers in the school, the effect is said to be extremely injurious to the nerves of many children, and leave evil influences for life. In addition to this, the use of slates is attended with many other disadvantages. Children acquire a heavy hand by their use, and accustom themselves to a vicious holding of the pen. Physicians say that the sight is injured by it. The slate is heavy and is easily broken, and is a noisy implement in the school-room, besides being quite inconvenient to carry with books. In short, the slate ought to be abolished entirely, is the verdict.

January 3, 1873, Page Two

Page 2

Importing Labourers – We notice that the Ontario Government is now taking steps to properly organize a system by which those of our farmers who are in want of laborers can obtain them through emigration agencies stations at various points in Great Britain. By depositioning $21 with the Commissioner of Agriculture of Ontario for each adult required, they can obtain labour at a cheap rate, the money to be repaid back to the employer out of the wages of the labourer, except $6 per head which is given back to the employer as a bonus for bringing out each emigrant, or to the emigrant himself if he pays for his own passage out.

January 10, 1873, Page 1

The Coolest Robbery on Record – Policeman Badger of the Tenth Station had a bit of experience the other night which he is not fond of talking about. It was past midnight as he was leisurely pushing his way through Jessup Street, and when he came opposite to Drayton & Gogg’s jewelry store he observed gleams of light through the chinks of the shutters and rapped at the door:

“Is that you, policeman?” asked a voice within,

“Yes,” answered Badger. 

“Well, it’s only me. It’s all right– Kind o’ chilly out, isn’t it?”

“Yea.”

“Thought so. I was just fixing the fire. Good night.”

Badger said “good night,” and pursued on his way.

An hour afterwards Badger passed through Jessup street again and saw the light in the jewelry store. It didn’t look right, and he banged the door loudly…

Policeman Badger partook. Having wiped his lips and giving his fingers a new warming, he left the store and resumed his best, satisfied that all was right at Drayton and Fogg’s.

 But morning brought a new revealment.

Drayton & Fogg’s store had been robbed during the night of six thousand dollars’ worth of watches and jewelry; and though policeman Badger carries in his mind an exact daguerreotype of the robber, the adroit rascal has not yet been found.

January 10, 1873, Page2

What Causes Hard Times – We are fast becoming a nation of schemers to live without genuine work. Our boys are not learning trades; our farmer’s sons are crowded into cities, looking for clerkships in the Post Office; hardly one Canadian girl in each hundred will do housework for wages, however urgent her need; so we are sending to Europe for workmen and buying of her artisans’ worth of products that we ought to make for ourselves.

Page 2

Death of the Ex-Emperor Napoleon – The French ex-Emperor, Napoleon, died at Chishelhurst yesterday at 10:45. He had been suffering for a long time from a severe internal disease, and had undergone two or three operations. He was 65 years of age.

January 24, 1873, page 1

Touching Instance – ONE of the most touching instances of gratitude is alleged to have occurred at Lock Haven the other day. A little boy, the child of a welthy mother, tumbled into the river. He was rescued by a workingman and reatored to his parents. The woman gave the man a three cent postage stamp and said she would be glad to have him come up to her house and sit out in the entry and hear her play the piano. He wents-way with tears in his eyes. Such unnaccustomed kindness quite unnamed him.

Page 2

Lot Auction – STEELE BROS, sold their lots on the corner of King and Simcoe streets, by auction, yesterday, for the sum of $5,000. The corner lot has a frontage of 26 feet 6 inches on King street, and 64 feet 3 inches on Simcoe street; and was bought by W. H. Gibbs, Esq., for the sum of $3,000. The back lot has a frontage of 27 feet on Simcoe street, and 52 feet 7 inches deep, and was purchased by Mr . S. Trewin, for the sum of $2,000. 

Page 4

Temperley’s Line – The Steamers of this Line are intended to sail from Quebec and Montreal every Tuesday during the seasons of navigation of 1872, and from London every Wednesday, calling at Plymouth on the way out. Though tickets from all points west at reduced rates. Certificates issued to parties desirous of bringing out their friends. For full particulars apply to the Company’s Agent at Oshawa.
C. W. SMITH 

January 24, 1873, Page Four

2 thoughts on “The Month That Was – January 1873”

  1. Abolish the slate.
    They are “extremely injurious to the nerves of many children, and leave evil influences for life”. I grew up in public school in the 1950’s a remember a few fingernails scraping across the slate. Screeeeeech.

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