The Month That Was – April 1862

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Vindicator

April 2, 1862, page 2

County exhibition grounds.
At the last annual meeting of the South Ontario Agricultural Society, it will be recollected, a committee was appointed to make inquiry and report upon the subject of a permanent site for the holding of the County exhibitions. We observed that the council of the town of Whitby, agreeably to the resolution passed at a public meeting of the ratepayers is taking steps to supply the want. add a special meeting held on the 24th inst., by the council comma it was resolved that tenders for a plot of from 3 to 10 acres of ground be of advertised for, that the most suitable be purchased and fenced, and that it be leased for a term of years to the County Agricultural Society. By this step, the town will secure a good site for a part, as well as exhibition grounds, if a suitable piece of land is offered.

Phrenology – Rev. Mr. Smith’s third lecture in demolition of the science of Phrenology, is to be given in the Mechanic’s Institute, in Whitby, on Monday Evening, April 15th, commencing at 8 o’clock. Admission free.

April 9, 1862, page 2

The Nonquon Road purchase
The draft of a Bye-law (sic) for the purchase of the Nonquon Road, by the Township, in conjunction with the Village, has been rejected by the people of the Township. At the conclusion of the voting, at Columbus, on Saturday evening last, the result was

Against the Bye-law, 69
In favor of it, 55
Majority against the By-law 14

The storm of Saturday and the wretched conditions of the road, account for the lightness of the vote. As a consequence of the defeat of the proposed Bye-law for the Township, that the village will not be pressed to a vote.

We shall have something farther to say in reference to the whole subject next week.

Stoves, &c. – We need hardly call attention to Mr. H. Pedlar’s announcement in today’s issue. It speaks for itself. All persons in want of Stoves, Tinware, Lamps, Oil, &c., will do well to give the Nonquon Block a call.

April 16, 1862, page 2

Emancipation
Slavery in the United States is swiftly and surely drawing to a close. The people have got the monster by the throat, and despite the remonstrances of its interested defenders, now powerless, are determined not to release their hold until they have atoned for past reticence by doing all which they can constitutionally do to wipe out the odium which has always accompanied the mention of the name of America, on account of African Slavery.

On Friday last—we recorded with no ordinary degree of pleasure – the bill for the emancipation of slaves in the District of Columbia, including, of course the city of Washington, passed the United States House of Representatives by the gratifying and decisive vote of 93 against 39. It passed precisely as it came from the Senate, and will immediately become law. The bill provides for the appointment of the commissioners to appraise the “property” held to service, and allows the payment of no more than an average of $300 to the owners of coloured property, for each chattel emancipated. It also permits coloured persons to be witnesses in the process, as well as white people.

Spring Goods
Our readers throughout the County will see from our advertising columns this week, that the merchants of Oshawa are prepared to submit to their inspection an unusually choice, abundant and attractive assortment of new spring goods, this season, and at prices which, we venture to say, cannot be approached for cheapness, in many cases, in any other town or village between Toronto and Port Hope. We possess very good facilities for knowing how goods sell in other places, east, west and north, as well as in our own village, and we are confident that parties living in the back country will find it pay them well to come to Oshawa to make their purchases of Spring and Summer Goods, Hardware, Crockery and Groceries, to say nothing of Ready-made Clothing, Boots and Shoes, and Threshing Machines, Plows, Scythes, Hoes, Forks, Wagons, Harrows, Brushes, Furniture, Saddlery, &c., &c., all of which are manufactured here, and if brought elsewhere are very often procured at second or third hand, instead of from the manufacturer himself. Oshawa is the best place within thirty miles at least, at which to trade; because, saying nothing of the price of goods even, the greater portion of the articles to be procured here are manufactured on the spot by first class working men, from the best material of native or foreign produce, or else are imported direct from the manufacturers abroad, in Europe and the United States.

April 23, 1862, p2

At Bath, last week, a pedestrian ran six miles in 43 minutes

New Store Opened – Mr JW Fowke has removed his store from Harmony to his new building at the west end of Gibbs Block, King street, Oshawa, where his customers will hereafter find him, better prepared than ever to attend to their wants.

Petitions for Prohibition
The friends of Temperance in Oshawa in East Whitby have [       ] themselves in a praiseworthy manner in the circulation of petitions for  a prohibitory liquor law, which were prepared at the last session of the Grand Division of Sons of Temperance. Two of the rolls from the Township have been sent in bearing 1070 names, and the one sent from Oshawa is signed by 650 persons. When the other list is completed, the number of petitioners from East Whitby and Oshawa will be over two thousand. Each name is signed three times – one petition being for presentation to the Assembly, another to the Legislative Council, and the third to the Governor General. We have not yet learned what steps have been taken in other parts of the County in the matter of petitioning. A large number of petitions for prohibition, from various parts of Canada, have already been presented to the legislature.

Petty Larceny – Quite a daring theft was committed in Oshawa on Wednesday last. Mr. George Gurley, Merchant Tailor, having received some splendid vest patterns, &c., for the ensuing season, had a number of rolls or bolts of the same displayed in his shop window for the inspection of passersby. While at dinner in a room to the rear of the shop, some person or persons would seem to have fallen in love with a bolt of beautiful silk velvet, and entered at the front door and abstracted from the shop window the whole bolt, valued at $20. Immediately on his return to the shop, Mr. Gurley missed the velvet, and forthwith instituted a constabulary search of the same, but thus without avail. The audacious thief eluded their detection, and is probably ere this far from the scene of his evil deed and the enjoyment of his illgotten (sic) velvet, or the money he may have realized therefor. This instance will serve as a warning to all shopkeepers and others to lock their doors while at dinner, even though, as in this instance, the dining room may be but a few feet from the shop and its contents with only a glass door between them.

The Grammar School – The Oshawa Grammar School has been reopened, and will be held for the present, in the Town Hall.  The scales of fees will be very moderate.

April 30, 1862, page 2

Almost a Fatal Accident
Yesterday forenoon, as Mr. James Connolly, of Oshawa, was driving a load of hay up to the window of a barn at Mrs. Woon’s, the horses’ heads into the doorway, the team refused to stop at the proper place, the result of which was that Mr. Connolly was most severely crushed against the top of the doorway – his breast and spine receiving the greatest injury. He lies in critical condition, though it is thought that he will recover.

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