The Month That Was – April 1872

All articles originally appeared in the Ontario Reformer

April 5, 1872

Barnum wants him – the man with the big cheek, who wants the Joseph Hall Works moved from Oshawa – the man who wrote to Mr. Glen offering him a “free water privilege, a liberal bonus, and freedom from taxation if he would remove to Hall Words to that town” – the town where the man lived. Oh no; the Halls Works is a big part of Oshawa, and it would spoil the looks of the town to have it removed.  It is very nicely situated, and pays well.

 

Lacrosse

A meeting of the Oshawa Lacrosse club will be held at Black’s hotel on Tuesday evening next, at 8 o’clock. All persons interested in out door sports, are invited to attend.  The Lacrosse boys have never been beaten, and intend to “go in strong” this year.  It is of the utmost importance that every member of the club should attend, and they are requested to bring along as many friends as possible.

April 5 72 p1

Earthquake

California last week experienced a most terrible earthquake.  The volcanic district in which it occurred is about four hundred miles southeast from San Francisco.  Only a slight shock was felt at the time in Northern and Central California.  The town of Low Pine, however, appears to be immediate over the centre of disturbance.  The first shock resembled the roar of artillery, fired immediately under the town. Nearly the whole population were buried beneath the ruins of the houses, and the air was filled with the cries and shrieks of the maimed and wounded, who were unable to extricate themselves, and who were calling for help.  The first shock was followed in rapid succession by three others of equal severity.  Over three hundred distinct shocks were felt between half-past two o’clock in the morning and sunrise. The fact is, the earth was in almost constant tremble and vibration for over three hours…  Over thirty persons have been killed, and more than one hundred were wounded.  Smoke and lava have issued from several of the mountain peaks in the same region of the country.

 

April 12, 1872

Clean Up

Now is the time for every householder to see that his premises are thoroughly cleaned, and disinfectants properly applied.  Tuesday afternoon last being quite warm, the stench arising from several yards we had occasion to pass, was fairly sickening; and if no remedy is applied the result can easily be foreseen.  Filth and disease go together; and if we are to escape the latter, we must set scavengers at work, and be in nowise chary in our use of disinfectants.  The work should be done now before the weather becomes warmer; and we how that our Health Inspector will at once proceed on his rounds, and make sure that the law in regard to filthy premises is fulfilled to the very letter.

April 12 72 p3_1_stitch.jpg

For Sale

The property on Selina St., consisting of a story and a half Frame dwelling, with stone foundation.  There is a stable and driving shed attached, and a good garden with a number of choice Fruit Trees on it: also, a never-failing well of excellent water.  For terms and other particulars apply on the premises, to Walter Fogg.

 

April 19

On Monday evening last, the members of the Oshawa fire brigade, with a few of their friends, assembled at the Town Hall to present Mr. Scott and Mr. Crockhart – who were about leaving this town for Scotland – the following address, as a token of esteem for these two gentlemen:

To David J Scott lieut. and James Crockhart ,sec’y Oshawa “Dreadnaught Hook and Ladder Company”

Dear comrades, -As you are soon to leave us on a visit to your native Scotland, we, the members of the Oshawa fire brigade, do you know that we cannot allow you to depart without an expression of the regret we feel at a temporary sundering of the connection between us.

We address you conjointly because we believe it will be agreeable to you both, who have been marked for your strong friendly attachment to each other, and because the sentiments we shall utter are equally applicable to you both.

For over two years either as private or officers, you have been members of the brigade. As private you were obedient to those in authority, and prompt and untiring in the performance of every duty and as officers you proved yourself skillful, kind and considerate.

In your private life your characters have been irreproachable, and you have ever manifested a readiness to assist in every good work.

In the illness, which is the cause of his leaving us, we deeply sympathize with Mr. James Crockhart, and pray that the breezes of his native land may restore him to vigorous health.

We also pray that Divine Providence me overrule the winds and waves that you may have a safe and pleasant Atlantic voyage, a speedy reunion with relatives and friends, and in their lovely company realize all anticipated joy.

Hoping that you may be spared to return to Oshawa to rejoin our ranks and participate in the honors and dangers of our association whose aim and ambition it is to save, we bid you an affectionate farewell.

Signed on behalf of the brigade, PH Thornton, Chief Engineer, H Barkell, Secretary

 

April 26, 1872

A big clock – the large clock at the English Parliament House is the largest in the world. The four dials of this clock are 22 feet in diameter. Every half minute the point of the minute hand moves nearly 7 inches. The clock will go eight and a half days, but it only strikes for seven and a half, thus indicating any neglect and winding it up. The mere winding up of the striking mechanism takes two hours. The pendulum is 15 feet long; the wheels are of cast iron; the hour bell is 8 feet high, and 9 feet in diameter, weighing nearly 15 tons, and the hammer alone weighs more than 400 pounds. This clock strikes the quarter hours, and by its strokes the short hand reporters in the parliament chambers regulate their labors. At every stroke a new reporter takes the place of the old one, whilst the first retires to write out the notes that he has taken during the previous 15 minutes.

April 26 72 p3

Two weeks have passed since the assembling of parliament at Ottawa, and very little has been done yet, beyond the answering of several questions by members of the government. Ministerial measures foreshadowed in the address, few as they were, are not yet ready for presentation to the house; and as a consequence the daily sittings generally last about an hour or two. The cabinet sessions are doubtless more occupied with plotting how to retain office then and maturing measures for the public weal.

 

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