The Month That Was – March 1967

All articles originally appeared in the Oshawa Times

March 1, 1967
Starr’s Early Campaign to be in low key
By Ken Clark

It’s the low-key approach for Michael Starr in his slow starting bid for the Conservative leadership to be decided at a Sept 6-9 convention in Toronto

“There’s plenty of time to get into high key,” the former labor minister told a reporter in his office Tuesday. “that will be done in the last two months before the convention”

Mr. Starr, Conservative floor leader in the Commons, eased into the race where others dramatically jumped. He finally committed himself last weekend in Oshawa, core city of Ontario riding which he has represented in the Commons since 1952. …

Mr. Starr says he’s moving slowly on his campaign but has stepped up his public appearances in the last two weeks.  He has just completed an Ontario swing.

Asked how he would appeal to youth, a big voting bloc at the convention, the 56 year old MP said

“I’ve never had any problems appealing to youth. I think young. I’m interested in today, tomorrow, and the future. What has gone on in the past is history.”

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March 2, 1967
War of 1812 Was Brewing Long Before it Broke Out
By Bob Bowman

The War of 1812 was brewing for a long time before it actually broke out.  There was more reason for war in 1807 than there was in 1812.  The Americans who wanted to fight Britain, with Canada the most important objective, were known as the “war hawks.”  They finally got their way when it was learned that a Capt. John Henry had been spying for Britain in the New England states.

Henry had been engaged by Sir James Craig who was Governor of Canada from 1807-1811.  He was given “most secret” instructions to learn if the Federalists in New England would side with Britain in case of war and break away from  the USA.

Henry was told that he might insinuate, though with the greatest caution, that if any of the Federalist leaders wished to enter into communication with the British government through Sir James Craig, that he (Henry) was authorized to receive any communications and deliver them.

His first report to Governor Craig was on March 2, 1808 and he claimed that New England was ripe for secession and would form an alliance with Britain in the event of war.

After making a number of similar reports, Henry tried to get a permanent job with the British government but was rejected.  He was so angry that he sold copies of his correspondence with Governor Craig to the US State Department for $50,000.

They were read to Congress and declared to be “an act of still greater malignity than any other outrage against the United States.”  War soon followed and although the New England States did not secede they did as little as possible.  In fact part of the State of Maine was captured by the British and its citizens took the oath of allegiance.  Money earned from a customs office there was used later to found Dalhousie University in Halifax.

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Arrested in Conspiracy: Clay Shaw (center) is led away from the New Orleans district attorney’s office after he was arrested and accused of taking part “in a conspiracy to assassinate President John F. Kennedy.” Shaw was taken from the office in handcuffs by district attorney assistants.

Murder Conspiracy Charge Laid Against Clay L. Shaw

New Orleans (AP) – Clay L. Shaw, wealthy retired director of the International Trade Mart, has been booked on a charge of “conspiracy to commit murder” in the District Attorney Jim Garrison’s first arrest in the Kennedy assassination investigation.

“There will be more arrests, a considerable number of them,” said Garrison, who has been conducting an investigation of the assassination of the President John F. Kennedy for the last five months.

Shaw, 54, a decorated army major in the Second World War, was released on $10,000 bond after his arrest Wednesday night.  His luxurious French quarter home was searched for nearly three hours by Garrison’s agents…

mar 3 67e.jpg
March 3, 1967 – City Centennial Project One-Third Completed: George Price, right, Sunnyside Park Neighborhood Association treasurer, looks out on the construction of the Civic Auditorium addition.  Explaining some of the features of the city’s centennial project is Robert E. Wilson, a director of the auditorium. Mr. Price made a donation to the building fund on behalf of Sunnyside Park, located at Stacey and McKim Streets for the new recreation complex.  The addition is one-third finished according to Harry Gay, building committee chairman.  “We are progressing well,” said Mr. Gay, “and we expect to complete the building before Sept. 1.”

March 6, 1967
Vanier Always Had Plenty of Time For All Oshawa School Children

Governor General Georges Philias Vanier, who died peacefully at Rideau Hall, Ottawa, Sunday, was cheered by thousands of Oshawa people during his 1965 visit here.  His great warmth, dignity and vice-regal elegance impressed those who saw and met him.

He was a special way of quickly integrating himself with those with whom he came in contact, regardless of their position in life.

He gave a good demonstration of this Sept. 24, 1965 when he addressed thousands of city school children in Memorial Park who had been given a special holiday for the occasion. They were cheering and applauding him with courteous concern from the outset. He didn’t diminish his stock with them when he announced that they would have a special holiday on the following Friday.

During their 20 mile auto tour of the city, the governor-general and Mrs. Vanier stopped several times to chat with school children grouped alongside the route.  Their excellencies also made an unscheduled stop at Hillsdale Manor to shake hands with some senior citizens seated in front of the building.

Lyman Gifford, then mayor, presented the distinguished guests with four replicas of Oshawa-made autos, at a civic luncheon.

The governor-general constantly made references to “the happy, well-nourished children he saw here and added “They are a guarantee of what our future will be:

The governor-general also paid tribute to RS McLaughlin on that visit.  He pointed out that Col. McLaughlin’s imagination and genius made his name famous throughout the country, but that “Mr. Sam’s” love for the Motor City had never diminished…

Before their departure, the governor-general said he was much impressed with the “beauty and friendliness of the Motor City.”

 

March 7, 1967
200 Students May Attend New College

“Community colleges are going to help make Canada more competitive in world markets and, at the same time, provide new paths in enjoyment of a rewarding life,” Dr. Gordon F. Willey, president of the new Ontario Durham College of Applied Arts and Technology, said at the Rotary Club of Oshawa Monday

Dr. Willey said the college will offer technological courses similar to those offered by the Ryerson Institute of Technology: technical and trade courses as well as business courses and applied arts subjects.

It will take care of those who cannot afford to go to a university as well as those who fail at these institutions of higher learning, he said.

It is planned to start classes this fall with an enrollment of about 200 students in the technology and business centres.  The college at first will occupy temporary or converted buildings, but that it is hoped by the end of the third year to have permanent facilities.

“We are planning a market survey to ascertain what the community wants and to visit industries to find out what skills are needed in the area,” Dr. Willey said.

He explained that the community colleges are institutions of continued learning past the secondary school level where courses in skills and occupational work will be geared to the needs of the community and meet the needs of the students.  Some students, after completing their course, may go on to university…

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