The Land Where We Stand

On Wednesdays, the OM is excited to offer a new feature series called The Land Where We Stand, a partnership with Durham College.


By Teresa Goff, Journalism Faculty, School of Media, Art & Design – ‎Durham College

The land where we stand is the traditional territory of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

Uncovering the hidden stories about the land our community is built on is what The Chronicle’s new feature series, The Land Where We Stand, is about.

We have talked to Oshawa Mayor John Henry, Oshawa Museum archivist Jennifer Weymark, former City Councillor Lousie Parkes, chair for Heritage Oshawa, Laura Thursby.

The Chronicle launched this project with Julie Pigeon, an advisor at Durham College’s Aboriginal Student Centre.

We sat down with Pigeon to participate in a smudging ceremony, to expand our knowledge or the history of the land and to learn how to make tobacco ties to give to elders when asking for information and stories about the land where we stand.

This series uncovers Durham Region’s lost stories and explores the impact history has had on shaping where we live.

You’ll read about famous buildings like the Hotel Genosha and Regent Theatre and discover places such as Harriet House, Oshawa’s first post office and the Oshawa skate park.

The Land Where We Stand series explores themes such as the impacts of World War II in Durham Region, businesses’ role in shaping our communities, the development of farm lands and maintenance of historic buildings.

Tune into Riot Radio (https://www.ustream.tv/channel/sariotradio) on Thursdays from 3 to 4pm for segments with guests like mayor John Henry.

We have a story map for you to check out online at www.chronicle.durhamcollege.ca<http://www.chronicle.durhamcollege.ca/>.

Follow us on Twitter @DCUOITChronicle and use #thelandwherewestand to join the conversation, ask questions or send us more information.

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One thought on “The Land Where We Stand

  1. Pingback: The North Oshawa Skatepark Isn’t Just About Skateboarding | Oshawa Museum Blog

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