Month That Was: April 1947

All news articles have come from the The Daily Times-Gazette

Tuesday April 1, 1947
Ayrshire Breeder In District Make First Shipment to China
First U.N.R.R.A. shipment of its kind from Canada, 12 head of topflight Ayrshire cattle, are rolling west by rail from here today on the first lap of the long haul to China.

Hermitage Farms, Pickering, owned by E. L. Ruddy and Son, was the key assembly point yesterday afternoon as the thoroughbred livestock where herded up the ramps into trucks in preparation for two-month trip. Three thousand miles away, a China-bound ship is waiting in Vancouver harbour for the Ontario shipment.

Arranged by the Dominion Department of Agriculture, this transfer of livestock to U.N.R.R.A. for relief of China’s decimated herds will be followed by further deliverers from other Ontario centres.

In addition to seven bulls and two heifers bred at Hermitage Farms, yesterday’s included one bull from Albert Cooper’s Netherhall Farms, Brooklin, one bull from F. G. Carswell’s farm, Brooklin, and one heifer from Cluaran Farms, owned by Charles Robson, of Oshawa.

“It’s the first sale of cattle to U.N.R.R.A. from Canada,” said Robert Ruddy, waiting for the trucks to arrive. “I think the last shipment to China like this was 14 years ago,” he added.

U.N.R.R.A. specifications were “very high”, Mr. Ruddy explained. Bulls had to be between 12 and 14 months of age and cows had to have a butter production record of 500 pounds per year running as far back as the granddam.

Mr. Ruddy said the livestock would be used for breeding purposes in China, where every phase of the economy has been riddled by ravages of invasion and civil war.

Nearly 300 applications had flooded in to U.N.R.R.A. headquarters when the agency called for men to accompany the Ontario shipment all the way to China. No one from the district had been chosen as far as Mr. Ruddy knew.

0012

The first shipment of its kind from this area, a shipment of 12 thoroughbred Ayrshire cattle from Hermitage Farms, Pickering; Netherhall Farms, Brooklin; F. G. Carswell’s Glen Carswell farm at Columbus and Cluaran Farms, Oshawa, is rolling toward the west coast today on the first lap of its journey to China. The shipment which was arranged for U.N.R.R.A. by the Dominion Department of Agriculture, was assembled at Hermitage Farms and loaded yesterday. The nine bulls in the shipment, left to right are: Glen Carswell Peter Pan, from the Glen Carswell Farm; Hermitage Double Burton, Hermitage Lustre General, Wallabrae Buster Earl, Hermitage Royal Charlie, all from Hermitage Farms; Brooklin Danny Boy, from Netherhall Farms; Hermitage Coronation Master, Hermitage Lord Douglas 3rd and Hermitage Lucky Noble Art, from Hermitage farms. -Photo by Campbell’s Studio

 

April. 8, 1947
AUTHORIZE CEDARDALE PLAYGROUND
Cedardale is to have its long awaited playground.

On motion of the city council last night, authorization was given to the east portion of the former Coulter property being used as a playground so long as it is not required by the city for any other purpose. Authorization was also given for the Board of Works to do the necessary grading.

The property, now owned by the city, is the site of the former Coulter Manufacturing plant and runs from Simcoe Street to Ritson Road south of the Skinner Co. plant. The portion for the proposed playground is that nearest Ritson Road.

Pointing to the need for a playground in this area, Recreation Director R.L. Coleman said it was hoped it could be put into use this summer. The site, he said, is large enough to be useful of all types of activities including sports and outings for the large industries in the area.

Mr. Coleman said the property would accommodate a hard ball diamond, there being no other diamond of this kind south of King Street. He outlined the south-east corner as the part of the new park most suitable for the children’s play area.

Tried to Pick Fight with Police
George R. Kirtley, East Whitby, was fined $5 and costs or five days, on a charge of disorderly conduct, to which he pleaded guilty in Magistrate’s Court this morning. It was pointed out that the accused had no previous record.

Constable Harvey testified he and constable Harry King were trying to stop an argument between several fellows in front of the Woolworth Building on King Street West, about 1:25 a.m. Sunday when the accused came out of the New Service Lunch and intervened.

“The accused tried to pick a fight with us when we were busy breaking up the other argument,” the officer said.

Kirtley in his own defence started that he had been drinking, but not to excess that night. He was only striking up for his friends and not trying to pick a fight with anybody.

CANCER CASES ON INCREASE V.O.N SAYS
Statistics produced by the supervisor of the Victorian Order of Nurses, Miss Edith Hill, at a regular monthly meeting on the V.O.N. executive here yesterday afternoon, show there is a vast increase in the number of cases if cancer and pneumonia in this city. Cancer in the city has risen to five cases as compared to one last year at this time.

During February, the nurse’s report said, a total of 70 admissions were made; visitations were 432; and fees received were $153.50. During March this year there were 75 admissions; visitors 468 and fees amounting to $176.50.

Miss Downey, a graduate of the public health nursing course at the University of Toronto, is taking her practical training with Miss Hill at the present time.

At yesterday’s meeting Alderman Clifford Harmon was appointed council representative on the Victorian Order of Nurses executive board here.

It was also resolved that W.E.N. Sinclair, K.C., M.P., be asked to represent the local V.O.N. branch at the 49th annual meeting of the Board of Govenors of the V.O.N. of Canada to be held in Ottawa, April 29 and 30.

 

April. 15, 1947
Quick Action Saves Child From Water
The quick action of Mrs. Harry King, Ritson Road North, saved three-year-old Marie Taylor from possible drowning this morning when the child fell into a cellar for a new house which contained two or three feet of water.

Mrs. King, who resided on the east side of Ritson Road North, two houses Rosedale Avenue, noticed an object in the water in the cellar which is just north of her house. Going out she found a little girl in the water and without delay went into the water and rescued her.

Marie, who lives in Toronto and was visiting her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. O’Donnell, 334 Ritson Road North, is now none the worse for her experience.

Neighbors said this was not the first time children had fallen into the water in the cellar.

Good Nickel Chocolate Bar Needed
By The Canadian Press
What Canadians want is a good five-cent chocolate bar, a Canadian Press survey showed today.

Most citizens questioned agreed with C.C.F. leader M.J. Coldwell who pleaded in the House of Commons yesterday for a return to the five-cent bar. He raised the question in commenting on the recent price increase which hiked the wartime six-cent bar to eight-cents.

The survey showed that while the average Canadian kid will go for his chocolate bar regardless of price, his more money conscious dad is beginning to smit loud squawks of protest. In some localities the price boost led to increased supplies while others noted no change in a candyless situation.

One curious feature was a wide divergence in reports of sales, Toronto reporting a 50 per cent drop in sales volume and other cities, notably Winnipeg, reporting sales of all supplies available. Some points said it was too early to note any difference in the week since the increase went into effect.

Montreal reported there was a slight dropping off in sales but most adults were buying all in sight. Dealers anticipated a further decline in sales as supplies increased. Ottawa confectioners looked to an easing in the supply situation while they reported customers were getting more “choosy” at the higher price and inclined to take only what they considered the better bars.

Toronto dealers took an optimistic view and said that when customers got used to the idea of the eight-cent bar they’d start buying again.

In the West, while complaints were frequent and there was some decrease in sales, dealers generally reported selling all they had on hand.

April. 22, 1947:
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April. 29, 1947
City Buys Snowloader
Purchase of a snowloader for the city was authorized last night by the City Council while tenders for a caterpillar tractor to be used in connection with the proposed sanitary land fill system of garbage disposal was referred to the city engineer for his recommendation.

The snowloader, complete with overhead loader and bulldozer blade, will be purchased from the General Supply Co. of Canada for $4,663.

Tenders from four firms were received for the tractor and after the city clerk had read the lengthy technical descriptions embodied in these it was moved the City Engineer W. Dempsey study them and bring a recommendation as to the most satisfactory. The price ranged from $6,020 to $7,270.

 

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